Navigation Links
Frequent doctor visits benefits patients with diabetes
Date:9/27/2011

BOSTON, MAThe risk for diabetes complications, such as heart attack and stroke, increases with high blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Reducing risk means reducing these values to ideal levels. According to researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), achieving ideal levels may be as simple as seeing your doctor. They found that frequent doctor-patient encounters are associated with faster achievement of blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol treatment goals. The research will be published in the September 26, 2011, issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

Apart from monitoring a patient's hemoglobin A1C (a type of blood glucose measurement) levels every three months, there are no current recommendations in diabetes care guidelines indicating how often doctors should see their patients. These research findings may provide an answer, suggesting that encounters every two weeks may be appropriate for those whose diabetes are severely uncontrolled.

Researchers looked at the electronic medical records (EMRs) of 26,496 patients with type 2 diabetes who had at least one instance of high hemoglobin A1C, blood pressure or LDL cholesterol ("bad" cholesterol) values. A doctor-patient encounter was defined as any note made in the EMR, which included face-to-face encounters, as well as remote encounters such as via telephone. All patients in the study were seen by primary care doctors for at least two years from January 2000 to January 2009.

Researchers evaluated the length of time it took for high levels of hemoglobin A1C, blood pressure and LDL cholesterol to decrease to reach treatment goals. They also determined the mean doctor-patient encounter intervals within this time span.

Patients who saw their doctor every 1𔃀 weeks achieved treatment goals sooner than those who saw their doctor every 3𔃄 months. Patients who saw their doctors every 1𔃀 weeks had a median time of 4.4 months (non-insulin patients) and 10.1 months (insulin patients) to reach their hemoglobin A1C treatment goals compared to 24.9 months (non-insulin patients) and 52.8 months (insulin patients) for those who saw their doctor every 3𔃄 months. Blood pressure level goals were reached at 1.3 months in the 1𔃀 week group vs. 13.9 months in the 3𔃄 month group. LDL cholesterol level goals were also reached sooner at 5.1 months vs. 32.8 months, respectively. For all values combined, the median time to reach treatment goals was 1.5 months vs. 36.9 months, respectively.

Alexander Turchin, MD, MS, BWH endocrinologist and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and the study's senior and corresponding author, attributes several interactions during these encounters for reaching target goals.

"Physicians may be prescribing new medications or increasing the dose of existing ones," said Turchin. "Another process occurring is lifestyle counseling. Physicians are telling patients how they can improve their diet. They are telling their patients to exercise more and lose weight, which is going to help their diabetes control."

Further analysis showed that doubling the amount of time between doctor-patient encounters increased the time it took to reach treatment goals. Time to reach hemoglobin A1C goals increased by 35 percent (non-insulin patients) and 17 percent (insulin patients). Time to reach blood pressure and LDL cholesterol treatment goals increased by 87 percent and 27 percent, respectively.


'/>"/>

Contact: Holly Brown-Ayers
hbrown-ayers@partners.org
617-534-1603
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. More Frequent Doctor Visits May Benefit Diabetes Patients
2. Frequent Tests Help Track Progression of Glaucoma, Study Finds
3. ERs Frequented by Kids With Behavioral Problems: Report
4. Frequent moderate drinking of alcohol is associated with a lower risk of fatty liver disease
5. Large study finds CT scans are frequently unnecessary after head injury in children
6. Frequent Business Travel Tough on the Heart, Study Finds
7. Frequently hospitalized patients may benefit from new medical specialty focused on their needs
8. Intellectual disability is frequently caused by non-hereditary genetic problems
9. Study: Infrequent Sex Can Raise Risk of Heart Attack, Death
10. Medically underserved girls receive less frequent evaluation for short stature
11. Frequent Pitching Could Harm Kids Shoulders, Elbows
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... Anyone who uses scales know they have limits; a ... using that same scale to dispense medication. The first example is an issue of ... why it is important to have the right balance for the process. METTLER TOLEDO’s ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... Calif. (PRWEB) , ... July 24, 2017 , ... A ... from food addiction to sexual abuse, and how she has overcome them. “Forbidden Memories: ... instances in her life and how she has risen above. , In “Memories,” readers ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... ... July 24, 2017 , ... Right now, behind ... The agency is hammering out a game plan to implement changes and compromises ... to affect FDA-regulated firms. The new law:, ,     Seeks ways ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... ... , ... “A Short Walk to the Mailbox”: a remarkable memoir of an ... author, Ed Clark. Ed Clark is a church music director and choral conductor. ... of music and worship leader for over fifty years. He has a master’s ...
(Date:7/23/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... July 23, 2017 , ... A ... in St. Louis, and led by the Minneapolis Veterans Administration Health Care System overwhelmingly ... of the disease offers very few benefits. , In the cases involved with ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/14/2017)... 2017 It should come as no surprise to ... in the midst of a crippling opioid epidemic. According to ... number of overdose deaths from opiate-based medications has quadrupled, Says, ... million dead from 2001 to 2015". During this time, the ... similarly quadrupled, drawing a compelling link between prescription and eventual ...
(Date:7/12/2017)... is a revolutionary new product that relieves painful carpal tunnel syndrome ... affects more than 8 million people a year. Women suffer from ... methods of treating CTS are painful surgery, the use of NSAIDs ... ... a clear patch worn on the palm of the hand. It ...
(Date:7/11/2017)... Md. , July 11, 2017  The global ... estimated revenues of approximately $394.1 million in 2016.  Although ... trend of solid growth, in particular as a result ... clinical practice, and the recent introduction of a significant ... need for less-invasive testing of tumor biomarkers to guide ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: