Navigation Links
For Some, Diabetes Care Worse Than Illness Itself
Date:9/27/2007

Complicated daily regimens lower their quality of life, survey finds

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For some people with diabetes, the burden of adhering to their daily care regimen nearly equals that of their diabetes-related health complications, a U.S. study finds.

University of Chicago researchers conducted interviews with more than 700 adults with type 2 diabetes.

As reported in the October issue of Diabetes Care, some patients said the inconvenience and discomfort of having to take numerous medications each day, carefully monitoring their diet, and getting the required amounts of exercise had a major impact on their quality of life.

Each day, a typical diabetes patient takes many medications, including two or three different pills to control blood sugar levels, one or two pills to lower cholesterol, two or more pills to reduce blood pressure, and an aspirin to prevent blood clots. As the disease progresses, the number of drugs increases and often includes insulin shots, according to background information in the study.

From 12 percent to 50 percent of patients interviewed said they were willing to give up 8 of 10 years of life in perfect health to avoid a life with diabetes complications, but between 10 percent and 18 percent of patients said they were willing to give up 8 of 10 years of healthy life to avoid life with treatments.

"The people who care for patients with a chronic disease like diabetes think about that disease and about preventing long-term complications," lead author Dr. Elbert Huang, assistant professor of medicine, said in a prepared statement. "The people who have a chronic disease think about their immediate lives, which include the day-to-day costs and inconvenience of a multi-drug regimen. The consequences are often poor compliance, which means long-term complications, which will then require more medications."

The study findings show "that we need to find better, more convenient ways to treat chronic illness," Huang said. "It is hard to convince some patients to invest their time and effort now in rigorous adherence to a complex regimen with no immediate reward, just the promise of better health years from now."

The patient interview results "certainly ring true with me," said diabetes specialist Dr. Louis Philipson, professor of medicine at the University of Chicago. He was not involved in the study.

"Some patients, if you judge by their behavior, would rather be well on the road to future blindness, kidney failure or amputations than work hard now at their diabetes," Philipson said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about diabetes control.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: University of Chicago Medical Center, news release, Sept. 27, 2007


'/>"/>
Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Music to Some, Torture to Others
2. Cutting Back on Salt Is a Necessity for Some, Not All
3. Anemia Drug Overused and Could Hasten Death in Some, Say Experts
4. Is Diabetes the Leading Cause of Kidney Failure in India
5. Diabetes and Depression often go hand-in-hand
6. Vitamin E, the latest warrior against diabetes
7. Thirty minutes of work up per day reduces the risk of Diabetes
8. New Drug for Diabetes
9. Diabetes, obesity rates shooting up
10. Promising Treatment for Diabetes
11. Caffeine Found To Worsen Diabetes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... , ... For more than fifty years, we've suffered whiplash as each new scientific study seemed ... the latest nutritional advice – advice that was supposed to keep us healthy and slim. ... American adults are considered to be overweight and more than 1 in 3 adults are ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... "FCPX LUT Intense allows users ... footage," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , With the ... easily add stylish color grades to their footage. A LUT is a Lookup Table ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... Researchers from SUNY State College of Optometry ... work on visual evoked potential and human attention. The article, VEP and Human ... Diopsys® NOVA™ ERG and VEP Vision Testing System (Diopsys, Inc., Pine Brook, NJ) ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... First Choice Emergency Room , the largest network ... as the Medical Director of its new DeSoto facility. , “We are pleased ... location,” said Dr. James M. Muzzarelli, Executive Medical Director of First Choice Emergency Room. ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... , ... May 25, 2016 , ... Stern Environmental ... will be selling the device branded as Stern’s Real Time Monitoring (RTM) ... bedbugs to the hotel and motel industry, colleges for use in dormitories, shelters, and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... May 24, 2016 Een app ... zodat zij collectief patiënten kunnen behandelen, hun kennis kunnen ... idee achter de nieuwe en revolutionaire MDLinking App, ontwikkeld ... Nederlandse vaatchirurg dr. Hans Flu en oncologisch chirurg dr. ... inmiddels beschikbaar is, wordt op dinsdag 24 mei officieel ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... May 23, 2016 Global Paclitaxel ... pages, profiles 12 companies and the Paclitaxel analysis in ... on the industry and its players. This ... in nature, details the current state of the industry ... definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Paclitaxel ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... , May 23, 2016 Transparency ... " Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency Market - Global Industry Analysis, ... ." According to the report, the exocrine pancreatic insufficiency ... 8.3% from 2015 to 2023 to reach US$2.85 Bn ... a condition characterized by the deficiency of the exocrine ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: