Navigation Links
For Males, Video Game Rewards Are All in the Mind
Date:2/8/2008

Study sees greater activation of key brain region than found in females

FRIDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- If you're a video game "widow," science might now be able to tell you why.

New research from Stanford scientists shows that the part of the brain associated with reward and addiction was more activated in males than in females when both genders played a game whose object was to acquire more territory.

In other words, the game was more rewarding for males, who were therefore more motivated to succeed.

The findings could have implications beyond the video screen and console, offering insights into what motivates human behavior.

"It's my sense that the results really do open a fascinating realm of future investigations," said Dr. Kathryn J. Kotrla, chairwoman of psychiatry and behavioral science at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine in Round Rock. "These investigations allow one to visualize literally the reward that different individuals experience."

"It would be fascinating either to determine what motivates women more than men or, within a specific gender, to look at the range of motivations and rewards for different variables," she added. "The study itself is looking at gaining territory but one could imagine studies that dealt with attachment or caring for others, so it really opens the door to a wide range of extremely interesting questions about human motivation."

According to background information in the study, which was recently published online in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, more than 230 million video and computer games were sold in 2005.

"Forty percent of Americans play video games, and men are two to three times more likely to feel addicted," said study author Dr. Fumiko Hoeft, senior research scientist at Stanford University School of Medicine. "It seems like an international phenomenon, but no one has looked at how the brain responds."

For the study, 22 Stanford undergraduates (half of them men and half women) were recruited to play a video game designed by the study authors. The game purposely dealt with territoriality, as men are known to be more territorial than women, Hoeft said.

Half the space on the screen "belonged" to the player; the other half showed balls coming toward the player's space. Clicking on the balls before they hit the dividing wall resulted in a space gain. But if the balls hit the wall, the player lost space.

Participants were not told that the object of the game was to gain more space but all quickly caught on.

Although both genders clicked on the same number of balls, men quickly acquired more space than women, apparently because men were better at identifying which balls (those closest to the wall) would give them the most space if clicked.

While playing the game, the participants were hooked up to functional MRI, which shows which parts of the brain are activated at different times. All participants showed activation in the mesocorticolimbic center of the brain, which is typically associated with reward and addiction. But the male brains showed much more activation in this area.

"Women and men showed activity in the reward circuitry, which overlaps with addiction circuitry," Hoeft explained. "Men activated those regions more than women, and the brain regions moved together more than women."

When participants played a video game that had no territorial aspect, there was no difference in men's and women's brain activation. "It's linked to the reward of more space," Hoeft said.

According to the study authors, most computer games that males like to play involve territory and aggression, explaining why men seem more likely to get hooked.

More information

The National Institute on Media and the Family has more on "taming the video game tiger."



SOURCES: Fumiko Hoeft, M.D., Ph.D., senior research scientist, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.; Kathryn J. Kotrla, M.D., chairwoman, psychiatry and behavioral science, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Round Rock; Journal of Psychiatric Research


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Can a Video Game Make Your Kids More Fit?
2. Video games activate reward regions of brain in men more than women, Stanford study finds
3. Verathon Inc., maker of GlideScope(R) Video Laryngoscopes, Introduces Free Grant Writing Kit for EMS Professionals
4. VIDEO from Medialink and Siemens: Doctors Trade in their Stethoscopes for Microphones
5. Video: New Survey Shows Young Women Turn to Traditional Values in Life, Relationships and Health
6. MultiVu Video Feed: WELCHOL (R) (COLESEVELAM HCL) RECEIVES FDA APPROVAL FOR GLUCOSE CONTROL IN ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELITUS
7. VIDEO from Medialink and The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: Saving Lives One Mile at a Time
8. VIDEO from Medialink and Stryker: New Alternative to Hip Replacement Surgery
9. InfoLogix Featured in FOX Business News Interview on Reducing Healthcare Medication Errors - Video Available Online
10. VIDEO from Medialink and Revolution Health: RevolutionHealth.com Launches Resolutions 2.0
11. VIDEO from Medialink and GlaxoSmithKline: Really Think You Can Lose 30 Pounds in 30 Days?
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
For Males, Video Game Rewards Are All in the Mind
(Date:6/27/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2016 , ... TopConsumerReviews.com recently ... of Eyeglasses . , Millions of individuals in the United States and Canada ... become a way to both correct vision and make a fashion statement. Even celebrities ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... ... Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop a weight loss ... plans to fix the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, ... , They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their exercise program ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Viejo, California (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... to fit their specific project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... fully customizable and all within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom ... of success. In terms of the latter, setting the bar too high can result ... more than just slow progress toward their goal. , Research from PsychTests.com ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Pulmonary Hypertension ... that it will receive two significant new grants to support its work to ... its 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists for their work ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... INDIANAPOLIS , June 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... Diabetes Tomorrow,s Leaders Scholarship is any indication, the future ... today online at www.diabetesscholars.org by the Diabetes ... stand in the way of academic and community service ... scholarship program since 2012, and continues to advocate for ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Revolutionary technology includes multi-speaker ... , industry leaders in advanced audiology and hearing aid ... Opn ™, the world,s first internet connected hearing aid ... devices.      (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160622/382240 ) ... of ,world firsts,: , TwinLink™ - the ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... The vast majority of dialysis patients currently ... are usually 3 times a week, with treatment times ... time, equipment preparation and wait time.  This regimen can ... patients who are elderly and frail.  Many elderly dialysis ... centers for some duration of time. Residents ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: