Navigation Links
Following a protein's travel inside cells is key to improving patient monitoring, drug development

In science, "simple and accessible detection methods that can rapidly screen a large cell population with the resolution of a single cell inside that population has been seriously lacking," said Virginia Tech chemical engineer Chang Lu.

In the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science, Lu has announced that he and his coworkers have developed a novel technique that detects the subcellular location of a protein (Chem. Sci., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00578C,!divAbstract). The significance of this method is that the technique will allow the scientific and technological communities a simple and improved method for studying effectiveness of therapies for disease, including cancer.

If a protein is not located in the right subcellular compartment of a cell, "the result can be diseases ranging from metabolic disorders to cancers," Lu explained. "Modulation of protein transport inside a cell is practiced as an important therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. The subcellular location of a target protein can also serve as a useful read-out for high-content screening of cancer drugs."

In the human body, proteins move between distinct compartments inside cells, including the plasma membrane, the nucleus, and other membrane-enclosed areas. This movement can be a prerequisite for proteins to carry out their intended functions. These functions might include gene transcription and other molecular regulations.

In the publication, Lu and his colleagues, Zhenning Cao, a graduate student of the School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Shuo Geng, a postdoctoral researcher, and Liwu Li, professor of biological sciences, all of Virginia Tech, described the shortcomings of current evaluations of protein movement.

One such technique is fluorescence microscopy. According to Lu, it can only analyze a limited number of cells. Data collected by a second existing assay called subcellular fractionation only reflects the average properties of the cell populations "without revealing the heterogeneity that is often present among seemingly identical cells," they stated.

Lu' team had made some progress in screening cell populations in the past using an electroporation-based technique, but it did not allow the examination of native proteins and primary cells isolated from animals and from patients.

Their new work uses a method that "incorporates selective chemical release of cytosolic proteins with a standard procedure for fluorescent labeling of the protein to detect the subcellular location of a native protein," Lu said. This simple and unique tweak to the conventional cell staining process allowed them to accurately define the subcellular location of the protein by measuring the amount of the residual protein after release. Using a flow cytometer, the speed of such measurement could reach 10,000 to 100,000 cells per second.

A key ingredient to their process is the use of saponin, a class of amphipathic glycosides. It dissolves cholesterol and permeates the plasma membrane to allow protein release. "Gentle treatment by saponin shows minimal effects on the state of the cell," Lu added.

Contact: Lynn Nystrom
Virginia Tech

Related medicine news :

1. Scientists discover a new way to enhance nerve growth following injury
2. Medication does not help prevent ED following radiation therapy for prostate cancer
3. Patients with metabolic disorder may face higher complication risk following total joint replacement
4. Major League Baseball players win more games following Tommy John surgery
5. Is therapeutic hypothermia beneficial in all patients following cardiac arrest?
6. High potency statins linked to better outcome following a heart attack
7. Allsup Explains Why Social Security Disability Claims Can Be Denied Following Recent Report
8. Insight into likelihood of retinal detachment following open globe injury
9. RI researchers validate tool for pain assessment in patients following cardiac surgery
10. Kids II® Congratulates Singer Gwen Stefani Following Announcement of her Third Pregnancy, Offers Baby Gift Ideas
11. Parkinsons disease patients following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: fully understanding of social maladjustment
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Following a protein's travel inside cells is key to improving patient monitoring, drug development
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin residents seeking Mohs surgery services, can ... Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical and surgical dermatology. , Dr. Dorsey ... cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. Dorsey was under ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a ... Magna Cum Laude and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at ... returned to Los Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent article published June ... with. The article goes on to state that individuals are now more comfortable seeking ... common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles area medical group, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Pulmonary Hypertension Association (PHA) ... will receive two significant new grants to support its work to advance research ... anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists for their work in fighting ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Topical BioMedics, Inc, makers of Topricin and MyPainAway Pain Relief Products, join The ... raise to $12 an hour by 2020 and then adjusting it yearly to increase at ... the minimum wage, assure the wage floor does not erode again, and make future increases ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced ... Applications, Technologies, Forecasts" report to their offering. ... Smart Skin, Structural Health Monitoring, Composite Smart Structures, ... involves electronic and/or electrical components and circuits that ... such as vehicle bodies or conformally placed upon ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... and SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. , June ... -based mobile pulmonary function testing company, is now able to ... devices developed by ndd Medical Technologies , Inc. ... done in hospital-based labs.  Thanks to ndd,s EasyOne PRO ® , ... , can get any needed testing done in the comfort of ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 2016   Pulmatrix, Inc ., (NASDAQ: ... drugs, announced today that it was added to the ... its comprehensive set of U.S. and global equity indexes ... important milestone for Pulmatrix," said Chief Executive Officer ... our progress in developing drugs for crucial unmet medical ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: