Navigation Links
Fewer guessing games for lung cancer patients
Date:12/6/2010

Reston, Va. A study published in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine identified positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans as a potentially useful tool for predicting local recurrence in lung cancer patients treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). RFA, which uses localized thermal energy to kill cancer cells, is increasingly used as an alternative treatment for patients unable to undergo surgery or other therapies to treat lung cancer.

"This study reinforces the utility of 18F-FDG-PET imaging in cancer detection and follow-up while also providing new insight into factors that can be used for earlier prediction of recurrence after radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors," said Amit Singnurkar, M.D., FRCPC, assistant professor of radiology and medicine at McMaster University and lead author of the study "18F-FDG PET/CT for the Prediction and Detection of Local Recurrence After Radiofrequency Ablation of Malignant Lung Lesions." Dr. Singnurkar was previously a nuclear oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, where the majority of the study was conducted.

The five-year study followed 68 patients with 94 pulmonary lesions, including metastases and primary lung cancers. By reviewing 18F-FDG PET/CT scans performed before and after RFA, researchers were able to determine several indicators that could help predict local recurrence.

Among pre-RFA scans, lesion size and type of tumor (primary or metastases) were factors in determining potential for local recurrence. Standardized uptake value (glucose metabolic activity) was also a factor in pre-RFA scans, although not independent of lesion size. PET/CT scans conducted after RFA indicated that 18F-FDG uptake patterns, size of ablation margins and standardized uptake value were parameters that could predict the likelihood of recurrence.

Information gleaned from the pre- and post-PET/CT scans can increase the accuracy of recurrence detection and allow earlier diagnosis. This ultimately can facilitate better management, leading to improved patient outcomes.

"Used correctly, molecular imaging can provide more accurate and earlier results than anatomic imaging alone," noted Singnurkar. "Molecular imaging has the potential to detect and characterize disease earlier, at a point where it can be more amenable to therapy."

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 200,000 patients will be diagnosed with lung cancer and nearly 160,000 will die from the disease this year. The lungs are also a frequent site for metastases from breast, colorectal, prostate, head and neck, and renal cancers.


'/>"/>

Contact: Susan Martonik
smartonik@snm.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. More Protein, Fewer Refined Carbs May Keep Weight Off
2. Higher Statin Doses Linked to Fewer Heart Attacks, Stroke
3. Fewer U.S. Docs Accepting Perks From Industry: Survey
4. New lymphoma therapy may be more effective with fewer side effects
5. Eating Whole Grains, Fewer Refined Grains, May Help Heart
6. Fewer Bone Screens May Be OK for Some Older Women
7. Heart Surgery Patients Do Fine With Fewer Blood Transfusions: Study
8. When Doctors Admit Mistakes, Fewer Malpractice Suits Result, Study Says
9. Stomach Ulcers Sending Fewer Americans to the Hospital
10. Fewer Excess Pounds May Mean Fewer Hot Flashes
11. Fewer than half of breast cancer patients adhere to hormonal therapy regimen, study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... TherapySites, the leading ... with Tennessee Counseling Association. This new relationship allows TherapySites to continue ... Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional offers. , "TCA is extremely excited about ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... ... On June 10-11, 2016, A Forever Recovery, a holistic treatment center for ... Table in Battle Creek, MI, where the rehabilitation facility is located. This annual celebration ... world’s leading providers of cereal and other breakfast foods. Its residents often refer to ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Experts from the American ... Annual Research Meeting June 26-28, 2016, at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. ... including advance care planning, healthcare costs and patient and family engagement. , AIR ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Beach, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... UCLA with Magna Cum Laude and his M.D from the David Geffen School of ... Diego and returned to Los Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have experienced traumatic ... many turn to unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping ... released tools for healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... CLEMENTE, Calif. , June 24, 2016  American Respiratory Labs ... company, is now able to perform sophisticated lung assessments in patients, ... Technologies , Inc. Patients are no longer limited ... ndd,s EasyOne PRO ® , ARL patients like Jeanne R. of ... done in the comfort of her own home. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 2016 According to a new ... Pen Needles, Safety Pen Needles), Needle Length (4mm, 5mm, ... Mode of Purchase (Retail, Non-Retail) - Trends & Global ... the market for the forecast period of 2016 to ... Billion by 2021 from USD 1.65 Billion in 2016, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 VolitionRx ... of Dr. Edward Futcher to the ... effective June 23, 2016.Dr. Futcher was also appointed ... Governance Committees.  As a non-executive member of the ... and strategic counsel to VolitionRx in connection with ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: