Navigation Links
Fewer Medicare Patients Hospitalized for Heart Trouble
Date:5/11/2011

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Over the last decade, the number of Medicare patients hospitalized for cardiac issues dropped, accounting for a smaller slice of the 10-year hospitalization rate than non-heart related issues, new research indicates.

The finding stems from the largest effort launched in the past decade (1998 to 2008) to gauge Medicare hospitalization patterns. In the latest year, Medicare hospitalizations totaled about 13 million patients, the study authors said.

The research is scheduled to be presented Thursday at the American Heart Association's Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke meeting, in Washington D.C.

"We're seeing that common cardiac diseases are accounting for a smaller proportion of hospitalizations within the United States," study lead author Amit H. Sachdev, a fourth-year medical student at New York University School of Medicine, said in a heart association news release. "We believe this may reflect an improvement in medical care and preventive efforts and in delivering health care in the United States over the last decade."

Sachdev and his colleagues found that while six of the eight major causes for hospital admission have been on a downward trajectory over the past decade, heart disease hospitalization rates have fallen more quickly than those attributed to other causes.

Among heart health issues, they found that coronary artery disease hospitalizations among Medicare patients dropped the most (32 percent), followed by those prompted by heart attacks (down about 22 percent). Heart failure hospitalizations also fell by nearly 17 percent, the report found.

Conversely, hospitalizations because of an irregular heartbeat (cardiac arrhythmia) bucked the trend, going up by more than 10 percent.

The researchers also found that a number of non-heart related issues fell as causes for Medicare hospitalizations, including pneumonia, fluid and electrolyte disorders, and hip fractures.

The researchers speculated that a focused government effort to tackle heart disease may account for the observed drop in related hospitalizations.

"Heart disease is the leading cause of hospitalization in the United States, so you see a lot of government money focused at cardiac conditions," Sachdev said.

Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

To learn more about heart disease visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

-- Alan Mozes

SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, May 11, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Recession May Mean Fewer Nips & Tucks
2. Fewer platelets could be used for some cancer and bone-marrow transplantation patients
3. Fewer Deaths in Larger, Busier Hospitals
4. Pitt/Magee research finds women with preeclampsia have fewer blood vessel precursor cells
5. Better patient safety linked to fewer medical malpractice claims in California
6. Safer Patients Mean Fewer Malpractice Suits
7. Study finds post-transplant patients off steroids have fewer cardiovascular events
8. Prevention Gets Credit for Fewer Heart Deaths
9. Fewer Sugary Drinks, Less High Blood Pressure
10. Fewer Boys Born Following 9/11 Attacks
11. Simple change results in fewer unnecessary imaging exams for patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... ... is famous for gift giving with flowers, chocolates and other tokens of affection meant to ... more than 5.6 million Americans suffering with Alzheimer’s, those store bought gifts - no ... lives they’ve led and the people they’ve touched. , That’s why Give ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Steve Helwig & Associates Insurance & Financial, serving the families ... teamed up with Citizens Opposed to Domestic Abuse in support of its efforts to ... those victimized by the fear of violence in their own homes, donations may now ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... Remember the old saying “rub some ... to Perry A~, author of “Calcium Bentonite Clay” the health benefits of integrating clay ... and detoxifying the body. , A former motivational speaker, Perry A~ has since dedicated ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... this important news! AHCC and the Home Health and Hospice ICD-10 Transition Workgroup ... for official ICD coding guidance and clarifications, to address concerns over the use ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... According to research by the ... dental technicians to be certified or obtain continuing education. To increase patient awareness ... In Your Mouth?” campaign to inform dentists and patients about the possible lack ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... 8, 2016   GS1 US will hold ... them through GS1 Standards implementation to address the requirements ... Device Identification (UDI) rule. Scott Brown ... Gibson , senior director industry development, medical devices, GS1 ... GS1 US --> Scott Brown ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Pa. , Feb. 8, 2016   ... November Research Group (NRG),s pharmacovigilance technology services ... system-related consulting services and an Oracle Argus Specialized ... services to Life Sciences companies. ... and expands HighPoint,s life sciences capabilities and provides ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , Switzerland and PALO ALTO, Calif. ... in biological and chemical manufacturing, and Kodiak Sciences Inc., ... the treatment of retinal disease, announced today agreements for ... agreement, Lonza will manufacture material at multiple sites, including ... --> --> Retinal diseases, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: