Navigation Links
Few Young Women Getting Cervical Cancer Vaccine

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Few teenage girls and young women are getting the human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV), and many of those who start the regimen fail to take all three doses, new research reveals.

Although studies have shown that the HPV vaccine is safe and effective against several strains of the sexually transmitted virus, just one-third of teens and young women who start the three-dose series actually finish, and almost three-quarters don't start it at all, according to research being presented this week at the American Association of Cancer Research annual meeting in Philadelphia.

"Women who are eligible for this vaccine and could potentially benefit aren't getting it at rates to maximally prevent cervical cancer," said study author J. Kathleen Tracy, an assistant professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.

"This highlights the need for public health promotions and practice patterns to encourage vaccine uptake or at least discussion of the pros and cons," Tracy said.

Tracy has initiated a study to see if text messages will prompt women aged 18 to 26 to keep their follow-up appointments for subsequent doses of the vaccine.

According to background information in the abstract, about 30 percent of sexually active 14- to 19-year-olds are infected with HPV at any one time. Over time, persistent infection can lead to cervical cancer.

Two HPV vaccines are marketed in the United States. Gardasil, approved in 2006 for girls aged 9 and up, protects against four types of HPV, two of which cause about 70 percent of cervical cancers worldwide.

Cervarix, which covers the two strains of the virus responsible for most cases of cervical cancer, was approved in 2009.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that 11- and 12-year-old girls be targeted for the vaccine as most in this age group are not yet having sex and would therefore not have been exposed to HPV yet.

A 2008 survey, conducted before Cervarix was approved, found that only about half of American mothers intended to have daughters younger than 13 vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), despite government guidelines suggesting the opposite.

These authors looked at medical records on 9,658 girls and women aged 9 through 26 who were seen at the University of Maryland Medical Center between August 2006 and August 2010.

Only 27.3 percent of them opted to start the vaccine.

And of these, 39.1 percent completed just one dose, 30.1 percent got two doses and 30.7 percent finished the series.

Blacks were less likely than white women to get all three doses, and women aged 18 through 26 were less likely than younger girls to complete the series.

Dr. Mark Wakabayashi, chief of gynecologic oncology at City of Hope Cancer Center in Duarte, Calif., thinks suspicions about vaccines in general, including a lingering concern that childhood vaccinations can cause autism, may cause some reluctance. Those fears about autism are generally considered to be unfounded.

The stigma surrounding sexually transmitted diseases may also be a deterrent. "There are these connotations with sexually transmitted diseases, so I think a lot of parents feel that, when you're talking about minors, everybody else should have the vaccine except their own child," said Wakabayashi, who recommends the vaccine to his patients.

Tracy speculated that women aged 18 to 26 may be caught up in life's transitions at that point, like leaving home and going to college. For many young women, this is the first time they are making their own medical decisions.

As for the younger age group, parents also get busy or may be less enthusiastic about a second dose if there was a side effect, such as pain at the injection site or fainting, after the first shot, she speculated.

Recent research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, which was published in the journal Health Affairs, also found that ongoing news reports regarding mandatory vaccination of middle-school students diminished support for the policy.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on HPV and on HPV vaccines.

SOURCES: J. Kathleen Tracy, Ph.D., assistant professor, epidemiology and public health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore; Mark Wakabayashi, M.D., chief, gynecologic oncology, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, Calif.; Nov. 9, 2010, news release, American Association for Cancer Research, Nov. 2, 2010, news release, University of Minnesota

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Few eligible young women choose to take HPV vaccine to prevent cervical cancer, study shows
2. Cancer experience worse for young adults in spite of better survival odds
3. Concussion Rate in Young Hockey Players Higher Than Thought
4. Younger Men Not Going to the Doctor Enough, Survey Shows
5. Violent Media Can Desensitize the Minds of Young Males
6. Young Kids Easily Trust What Theyre Told: Study
7. Hospitalizations Way Up for Young Adults With Diabetes
8. New report: How will the affordable care act affect 15 million uninsured young adults?
9. 1 in 4 U.S. Teens and Young Adults Binge Drink: CDC
10. Children as young as 12 months can reach a countertop
11. $12 million grant to study young adult smoking behaviors
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Few Young Women Getting Cervical Cancer Vaccine
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... are pleased to announce their strategic partnership at the Radiological Society of ... Service, Inc., and Winscribe, global providers of cutting-edge dictation and speech-enabled documentation ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Several significant coding-related changes are anticipated to ... include new codes for spine and hip X-rays, paravertebral facet blocks and in ... changes in musculoskeletal, radiology and nervous system sections on an Orthopedic practice. These ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... and services which empower organizations through communication analytics, announced today that their Proteus® ... and manage their service quality. , Proteus® VoIP QMS (Quality Management System) ...
(Date:11/29/2015)... Michigan (PRWEB) , ... November 29, 2015 , ... "I ... games. Things that as a Mother and Wife would love to do, I missed. ... that I just happened to call Dr. Zaidan first. They have changed my life ...
(Date:11/29/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Khanna Vision Institute based in Los Angeles, announced that Dr. ... 2015. Peer Certification by the Board is done so the public knows that the ... obtained after the completion of three years of training or Residency in Ophthalmology. This ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... 30, 2015 Varian Medical Systems (NYSE: VAR ) ... partnership with Apollo Hospitals Group, the largest hospital chain in ... train radiation technologists in the country. The MoU was signed by ... and Ashok Kakkar , Varian,s India ... India , Varian intends to deploy its Access to ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... , Nov. 30, 2015   VolitionRx Limited (NYSE ... diagnostic tests for a broad range of cancer types and ... LD Micro Conference, which will be held December 1 - 3 ... from VolitionRx will be David Kratochvil , Chief Financial ... of Investor Relations. ® blood-based tests for ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... 2015 Mexico Healthcare and Life Sciences Report ... 2015 . --> Pharmaboardroom releases its new 98-page ... Latin America , a country of over 122 million people. ... over 122 million people. --> It offers companies, investors, ... sciences insights into the second largest pharma and healthcare market in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: