Navigation Links
Fever control using external cooling reduces early mortality in septic shock patients
Date:2/16/2012

Fever control using external cooling in sedated patients with septic shock is safe and decreases vasopressor requirements and early mortality, according to a new study from researchers in France.

"The benefits and risks of fever control in patients with severe sepsis remains a matter of controversy," said lead author Frdrique Schortgen, MD, PhD, of the Henri Mondor Hospital in Crteil, France. "In our study, external cooling to achieve normothermia in patients with septic shock was safe, accelerated hemodynamic stabilization, decreased vasopressor requirements, increased the rate of shock reversal, and decreased early mortality."

The findings were published online ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

In the multicenter trial, 200 febrile adults with septic shock from seven participating ICUs, all of whom were receiving vasopressor treatment, mechanical ventilation and sedation, were randomized to external cooling (n = 101) or no external cooling (n = 99). Patients underwent cooling for 48 hours to maintain a core body temperature between 36.5C and 37C. Vasopressors were tapered to maintain a mean arterial pressure target of 65 mmHg or more in both groups.

After two hours of treatment, body temperature was significantly lower in the cooling group. The percentage of patients with a 50 percent vasopressor dose decrease vs. baseline was significantly higher in the cooling group from 12 hours of treatment; this difference was not significant at 48 hours. Shock reversal during the ICU stay was significantly more common in the cooling group, as was day-14 mortality. All comparisons remained significant after adjustment for baseline vasopressor dose and sepsis severity scores.

The study had several limitations. Patients in the cooling group had a lower baseline dose of vasopressors, perhaps indicating lower illness severity, although all other variables associated with outcomes in sepsis were well balanced between the two treatment groups. In addition, the study was not blinded, and life-supporting treatments given before inclusion during the early stage of sepsis were not recorded.

"Although cooling prevented early deaths in our patients, mortality reduction was not significant at ICU or hospital discharge, and we cannot make definitive conclusions on the effects of cooling on mortality from our data" said Dr. Schortgen. "Larger studies are needed to confirm the positive effects of cooling on mortality we observed and to examine whether fever control provides any additional benefits in patients with severe sepsis."


'/>"/>
Contact: Nathaniel Dunford
ndunford@thoracic.org
212-315-8620
American Thoracic Society
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Flightless mosquitoes developed to help control dengue fever
2. Abington Memorial Hospital's Travelers Clinic Can Protect Travelers From The Now Active Yellow Fever
3. The Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative Introduces www.DengueWatch.org - a News hub for Tracking Dengue Fever Epidemics Worldwide
4. Study finds respiratory symptoms more reliable indicator of H1N1, not fever alone
5. Too Soon to Tell Whether Dengue Fever Will Spread in U.S.
6. Pet allergies worsen hay fever symptoms, Queens study finds
7. Kids Fevers May Not Always Need Treatment
8. Shar-Pei Dogs Shed Light on Human Fever Syndromes
9. Firstborn Kids Seem to Have More Food Allergies, Hay Fever
10. Childhood eczema and hay fever leads to adult allergic asthma
11. Kids Eczema, Hay Fever Linked to Allergic Asthma Later
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “When the Stars Lead Home”: a poignant story of loss, ... Laura Weigel Douglas, an avid reader who lives in the Pacific Northwest with her ... Green Hills Adventure Camp. She couldn’t be more grateful. , Twelve-year old Tizzy could ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... , ... “Just What Happened in the Garden of Eden”: retells the stories of three Bible ... creation of published author, Penelope Colt, mother, trader, horse farmer, artist and a former GM ... was three. At six, they moved to Dayton, Ohio, where Penny graduated high school. ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Last month, representatives from Rendina Healthcare Real ... officials to celebrate the grand opening of the 87,000 square foot medical office/ICU ... its ongoing relationship with RWJBarnabas Health, New Jersey’s largest health system. Two years ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... ... Altec Products, Inc., a leader in enterprise document management and ... in San Diego, CA. , At nVerge 2017, Altec will be highlighting ... their Sage ERP solutions by providing improved visibility and control to the entire document ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... Dr. Manju R. Kejriwal, ... ClearCorrect orthodontics, with or without a referral. Dr. Kejriwal understands the emotional and ... convenient, clear braces in Cincinnati, OH. Patients no longer need to feel the esthetic ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/22/2017)... Fla. , May 22, 2017  As ... as a whole continue to make the revolutionary ... becomes increasingly important for ensuring positive patient outcomes ... industry stakeholders are shifting focus away from clinical ... and effects of long-term specialty drug therapy utilization ...
(Date:5/15/2017)... ATLANTA , May 15, 2017  Amy Baxter ... the industry leader in noninvasive pain relief, was awarded ... MM&M magazine. Baxter was recognized at the MM&M ... New York City on May 10, ... helping the biopharma industry go "beyond the pill."  ...
(Date:5/11/2017)... , May 11, 2017  Thornhill Research Inc. ... been awarded an $8,049,024 USD five-year, firm-fixed-priced, indefinite-quantity/indefinite-delivery ... the Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) ( Ottawa, ... Systems to administer general anesthesia to patients requiring ... "The US Marine Corps have been a ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: