Navigation Links
Fetal alcohol exposure affects brain structure in children
Date:11/24/2012

CHICAGO Children exposed to alcohol during fetal development exhibit changes in brain structure and metabolism that are visible using various imaging techniques, according to a new study being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Alcohol use by expectant mothers can lead to problems with the mental and physical development of their childrena condition known as fetal alcohol syndrome. Research suggests an incidence of 0.2 to 1.5 per 1,000 live births, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Costs for care of individuals affected by fetal alcohol syndrome in the U.S. have been estimated at $4 billion annually.

Advancements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are affording unprecedented insights into the effects of alcohol on the central nervous systems of children whose mothers drank alcohol during their pregnancy. Recently, researchers in Poland used three different MRI techniques to better define these effects.

The study group included 200 children who were exposed to alcohol during their fetal stage and 30 children whose mothers did not drink while pregnant or during lactation. Researchers used MRI to evaluate the size and shape of the corpus callosum, the bundle of nerve fibers that forms the major communication link between the right and left halves of the brain, in the two groups. Prenatal alcohol exposure is the major cause of impaired development or complete absence of the corpus callosum.

The MRI results showed statistically significant thinning of the corpus callosum in the children exposed to alcohol compared with the other group.

"These changes are strongly associated with psychological problems in children," said Andrzej Urbanik, M.D., chair of the Department of Radiology at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland.

Dr. Urbanik and colleagues also used diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) to study six areas of the central nervous system in the children. DWI maps the diffusion process of water and can be a more sensitive means than traditional MRI for detecting tissue abnormalities.

Children in the alcohol group exhibited statistically significant increases in diffusion on DWI compared with the other children.

"The increase of diffusion indicates neurological disorders or damage to the brain tissue," Dr. Urbanik said.

To noninvasively study metabolism in the brains of the children, the researchers used proton (hydrogen) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HMRS), a common adjunct to structural MRI studies. HMRS results showed a complex collection of metabolic changes.

"In individual cases, we found a high degree of metabolic changes that were specific for particular locations within the brain," Dr. Urbanik said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Dangerous experiment in fetal engineering
2. Pregnant Mothers Gut Changes May Support Fetal Growth
3. New Stanford method enables sequencing of fetal genomes using only maternal blood sample
4. 3 types of fetal cells can migrate into maternal organs during pregnancy
5. Presence of fetal cells in women lowers risk of breast cancer but raises risk of colon cancer
6. Frequency of alcohol consumption and cardiovascular risk factors
7. Alcohol provides protective effect, reduces mortality substantial
8. Alcoholic Drinks Add 100 Calories a Day to Average Adults Diet: Study
9. Effects of alcohol on lymphoma, leukemia, and other types of hematological cancers
10. Genetic link between pancreatitis and alcohol consumption, says Pitt team
11. Alcoholism Linked to Poor Sense of Empathy, Irony in Men
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... January 24, 2017 , ... ... to Thrive , Well-meaning studies such as the Fordham Institute’s High Stakes ... serve top students, such as including gifted or high-achieving students as a subgroup ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 24, 2017 , ... ... Pollack, Ph.D., http://www.faculty.washington.edu/ghp , Sharon Kleyne, the nation’s foremost water advocate ... Global Climate Change and Your Health on Voice America, once again welcomed one ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... ... A yellow fever outbreak in Brazil has infected over 100 people and claimed ... contact with infected mosquitos. The outbreak has sparked increased concern about the virus and ... multiple health organizations, the best way to prevent yellow fever is through vaccination. For ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... January 24, 2017 , ... ... topics like finances, friendship, marriage, leadership, gossip, prostitution, adultery, anger, and common sense. ... authors, Dr. Judith Coats and Dr. David Coats. In September of 1983, they ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... , ... “Mysteries Revealed On Speaking In Tongues”: an engaging and dynamic ... Christians. “Mysteries Revealed On Speaking In Tongues” is the creation of published author, Tina ... located in Michigan. , “We need to partner with Jesus and be the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/24/2017)... India , Jan. 24, 2017 Market Research Future has ... Market for Wound Closure Device is growing rapidly and expected to continue ... ... at a CAGR of 5% from 2013 to 2019 and reaching a ... of the forecasted period, 2016-2022 Global Wound Closure Device Market ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... Nev. , Jan. 24, 2017  The ... that specializes in high-value orthopaedic implants, announced the ... today. The OIC Tibial Nail ... tibia. Strategically placed proximal and distal screw holes ... hole that allows dynamization.  The nail is available ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... 2017 Trifecta Clinical , a leading ... Rick Ward to Vice President of Commercial ... also announcing the promotion of Ericka Atkinson ... Rick joins Trifecta from Greenphire where he was ... business development positions within the healthcare industry throughout his ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: