Navigation Links
Females May Be Naturally More Prone to Stress: Animal Study
Date:6/15/2010

A male-only protein found in rats helps control stress signals in the brain, research shows

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to stress, women are twice as likely as men to develop stress-induced disease, such as depression and/or post-traumatic stress, and now a new study in rats could help researchers understand why.

The team has uncovered evidence in animals that suggests that males benefit from having a protein that regulates and diminishes the brain's stress signals -- a protein that females lack.

What's more, the team uncovered what appears to be a molecular double-whammy, noting that in animals a second protein that helps process such stress signals more effectively -- rendering them more potent -- is much more effective in females than in males.

The differing dynamics, reported online June 15 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, have so far only been observed in male and female rats.

However, Debra Bangasser of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and colleagues suggest that if this psychopathology is ultimately reflected in humans it could lead to the development of new drug treatments that target gender-driven differences in the molecular processing of stress.

In a news release from the journal's publisher, the study authors explained that the identified protein differences relate to the alternate ways male and female rats respond to the brain's secretion of a molecule called corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF).

CRF, they pointed out, controls the body's response to stress. When the researchers injected rats with CRF it took less of the molecule to excite the female rats than the male rats. The authors attributed this to a protein -- present in both genders -- that works to bind with CRF more effectively in female rats, thus elevating their stress sensitivity.

Male rats, on the other hand, were also better able to handle stress because of a second protein they possess that is absent in female rats. This protein allows male rats to "internalize" stress exposure by cutting back on the number of cell membrane receptors they make available for CRF binding, thereby reducing the molecule's impact.

More information

For more on managing stress, visit the American Academy of Family Physicians.



-- Alan Mozes



SOURCE: Molecular Psychiatry, news release, June 15, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Fat in Males, Females Differs Genetically, Mouse Study Shows
2. College Age Females Can Kiss Chlamydia Goodbye for Valentines Day
3. 'Get Pregnant' Aims To Help Couples Conceive Naturally, Faster
4. Oram Plus Set to Take the Pain out of Gum Disease and Cavities, Naturally
5. Study Shows Pine Bark Naturally Relieves Symptoms of Acute Hemorrhoids
6. Sleep Study Shows Pillo1 Re-Educates Body to Naturally Move Into Optimal Sleep Position and Increases REM Sleep by 21.3%
7. Daughters caring for a parent recovering from stroke more prone to depression than sons
8. Study Finds Military Prone to Infection With H1N1 Flu
9. Siblings of Kids With Autism May Be Prone to Hyperactivity
10. Chicago Plastic Surgeon Agrees That Women Are More Prone To Facial Wrinkles Than Men
11. Tired Teens Prone to Car Crashes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Females May Be Naturally More Prone to Stress: Animal Study
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Doctor C LLC, a company based out of Arizona that ... continue the marketing and distribution of its product, The Right C. , The Right ... absorption than traditional vitamin C supplements. At the trade show, Doctor C had the ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... Michael and Betsy Brauser celebrated 5 ... For Betsy, the clinical trial has been life-saving as she has been on ... , Betsy Brauser was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2009. She underwent standard chemotherapy ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... Chocolate Biscuit”: a biographical account following a man who went on to support his country ... Ivey, born in Lynn Haven, Florida and at the age of 5, his family moved ... he joined the Navy and got married right out of boot camp. , He ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... “Knowledge is God’s Lighthouse”: a ... “Knowledge is God’s Lighthouse” is the creation of published author, Gene Gaapf, a retired ... collections. , “I have been writing since high school and have many different ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... Next week after January 20th, ... by Congressional political games that circumvent health needs of over 30 million. Many interviews ... human anxieties and needs government public servants were suppose to prioritize. Interviews provided below. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/20/2017)... , Jan. 20, 2017  Ethicon Endo-Surgery, ... Megadyne Medical Products, Inc., a privately held ... markets electrosurgical tools used in operating rooms ... of Ethicon,s* advanced energy devices with Megadyne,s ... major step forward in Ethicon,s goal to ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... 20, 2017  Palladian Health, a leading provider ... launch of an opioid management program which assists ... and helps stem the growing tide of dependence ... treat chronic non-cancer pain (back pain, neck pain, ... lack of evidence regarding long-term effectiveness. ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... , January 20, 2017 Avillion LLP, ... appointment of Mark Weinberg , MD MBA as Chief Medical ... , USA . ... Dr Weinberg has spent more than 17 years ... 20" pharma companies to micro-cap biotech. Over the course of his ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: