Navigation Links
Fatty liver disease prevented in mice
Date:6/3/2014

Studying mice, researchers have found a way to prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Blocking a path that delivers dietary fructose to the liver prevented mice from developing the condition, according to investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

The study appears in a recent issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

In people, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease often accompanies obesity, elevated blood sugar, high blood pressure and other markers of metabolic syndrome. Some estimate as many as 1 billion people worldwide have fatty liver disease, though some may not realize it.

"Fatty liver disease is a major topic of research right now," said first author Brian J. DeBosch, MD, PhD, clinical fellow in pediatric gastroenterology. "There are competing hypotheses about the origins of metabolic syndrome. One of these hypotheses is that insulin resistance begins to develop in the liver first. The thought is if we can prevent the liver from becoming unhealthy to begin with, maybe we can block the entire process from moving forward."

The research team, led by Kelle H. Moley, MD, the James P. Crane Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, showed that a molecule called GLUT8 carries large amounts of fructose into liver cells. Fructose is a type of sugar found in many foods. It is present naturally in fruit and is added to soft drinks and myriad other products in the form of high-fructose corn syrup.

Scientists have known that fructose is processed in the liver and stored there as fat in the form of triglycerides. In this study, researchers showed that blocking or eliminating GLUT8 in mice reduced the amount of fructose entering the organ and appeared to prevent the development of fatty livers. Mice with GLUT8 deficiency also appeared to burn liver fat at a faster rate than control mice.

"We showed that GLUT8 is required for fructose to get into the liver," DeBosch said. "If you take away or block this transporter in mice, they no longer get diet-induced fatty liver disease."

The researchers also saw differences between male and female mice in the degree to which they were protected from fatty livers and in whole-body metabolism. Male mice fed a high-fructose diet while deficient in GLUT8 still had evidence of fatty liver disease, but whole-body metabolism was healthy. They showed no evidence of metabolic syndrome in the rest of the body. Females fed fructose while lacking GLUT8, in contrast, had healthy looking livers but exhibited more evidence of whole-body metabolic syndrome.

"If the fructose doesn't go into the liver, it may go to peripheral tissues," DeBosch said. "Female mice with a GLUT8 deficiency had increased body fat. They also had increased circulating triglycerides and cholesterol.

"So the liver is healthier in female rodents, but you could argue that the whole body has worse overall metabolic syndrome," he said. "This supports the idea of the liver acting as a sort of sink for processing fructose. The liver protects the whole body, but it may do so at its own expense."

While DeBosch said future therapeutics might be able to target GLUT8 to block fructose from entering the liver, more work must be done to understand how this would impact the rest of the body.

"In a perfect world, it would be good if we could figure out a way to direct fructose to tissues in which you're more likely to burn it than store it, such as in skeletal muscle," he said.

In the meantime, DeBosch advises his pediatric patients, many of whom are overweight or obese, to avoid fructose, especially sugar-sweetened drinks, and to find ways to increase physical activity.


'/>"/>

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. What what role does MSG play in obesity and fatty liver disease?
2. Snacking contributes to fatty liver and abdominal obesity
3. Lean patients with fatty liver disease have higher mortality rate
4. Obesity-induced fatty liver disease reversed in mice
5. More benefits emerging for one type of omega-3 fatty acid: DHA
6. BUSM researchers make a case for free fatty acids
7. Treatment for Liver Damage
8. “Fatty Liver Solution” Reveals to People a List of Foods to Restore Their Liver Function Quickly – Health Review Center
9. Fatty Liver Treatment
10. How “Fatty Liver Bible And Ezra Protocol” Helps People Eradicate Their Fatty Liver Disease Quickly – V kool
11. Omega-3 fatty acids may help heal a broken heart
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Fatty liver disease prevented in mice
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... , ... The event is being held on April 7, 2016 from 5:30 ... Over Parkinson’s will fund nearly $100,000 for research for the care and cure of ... and is the architect of this informative event to raise awareness and funds for ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... ... After years as an active staff surgeon and having served as the ... Carman transitioned to chief of the Division of Plastic Surgery at what is now ... and began a second three-year term in January of 2016. , The original selection ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Regular gym users know the routine: each ... longer to access the treadmills. It’s a predictable trend. After the excesses of November ... get in shape by joining gyms, starting new walking or running routines, or signing ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Dr. Justin Scott ... their 2nd Annual No Cost Dental Day to individuals in need. The event is ... of this No Cost Dental Day is to provide dental care to community members ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Health and wellness is a ... individuals in the event they are experiencing an illness. Migraines are a severe form ... are afflicted with migraines would not wish the pain on their worst enemy, the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... Feb. 4, 2016 Global Immunology Market ... to drive long-term market growth Summary ... of chronic disorders that affect 5–7% of western ... of their symptoms and key patient demographics, they ... immune pathways and an inappropriate immune response. Generally, ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... -- Mettler-Toledo International Inc. (NYSE: MTD ) today ... the highlights: , Sales in local currency ... year.  Reported sales decreased 3% as currency reduced sales ... earnings per diluted share as reported (EPS) were $4.44, ... EPS was $4.65, an increase of 10% over the ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... 4, 2016  AMRI (NASDAQ:  AMRI) today announced that ... and President of Pfizer Global Supply, has been elected to ... 2016. In addition, the Company announced that Mr. Gabe ... since 2010, has retired from the AMRI Board of Directors ... other business ventures.  William S. Marth , ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: