Navigation Links
Fatherhood Tied to Higher Prostate Cancer Risk
Date:1/7/2008

Findings from large study show a trend, but reasons aren't clear

MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Men who father children may be at higher risk of prostate cancer compared to those who forego the life experience, a Danish study suggests.

The large-scale study looked at all men born in Denmark between 1935 and 1988. It found that childless men had a 17 percent lower incidence of prostate cancer than fathers did.

The reasons why remain unclear.

"It is not possible from the current data to point out what factors associated with childlessness, whether biologic, environmental, social or behavioral, were responsible for the observed reduction in prostate cancer risk," wrote researchers at the Statens Serum Institut, in Copenhagen.

The study is published in the Jan. 7 online edition of Cancer, and will appear in the journal's Feb. 15 print edition.

The findings echo those of a prior Scandinavian study, published in 2005, which looked at more than 48,800 cases of prostate cancer. That report also found a 17 percent lower incidence of prostate cancer among childless men.

In neither of the two studies did the gender of the children fathered affect the man's risk of prostate cancer. However, one large-scale study conducted several years ago in Israel found that the malignancy was 40 percent more common among men with no sons.

Dr. Susan Harlap, now a professor of epidemiology at New York University, led that Israeli study. She said the differing results reflect the complex factors, genetic and otherwise, that underlie prostate cancer risk throughout the world.

"The incidence of prostate cancer is different in Israeli Jews than in northwestern Europeans," Harlap said. "It may be a different disease, and there may be a different set of causes. We do know there are genetic causes of prostate cancer, and there could be different sets of genes in Israeli Jews than in northwestern Europeans."

A relationship between prostate cancer risk and having no sons would point to a mutation in the Y chromosome, which determines the male sex of a child. But there are complexities to such a relationship, Harlap noted.

"If the effect is due to Y chromosomes, they are quite specific to ethnic groups," she said. "Israeli Jews are different from Danes and Swedes."

The complexity of the issue is also illustrated by the different findings of the two Scandinavian studies about fatherhood and risk. The new Danish report finds that "among fathers, a significant trend was observed of gradually reduced prostate cancer with increasing number of children" -- in other words, fatherhood was linked to an increased risk for prostate cancer, but fathering more children begins to bring that risk down again. In contrast, the earlier study found "no further change in risk associated with fathering of more than two children."

Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, was less than impressed by the Copenhagen findings, however. Despite the large numbers, the result was "just barely statistically significant," Brawley said, and could be the result of pure chance.

In a study of this kind, he said, "you occasionally get something that is statistically significant but is not really significant biologically."

In any case, men shouldn't make decisions on fatherhood based on the study results, Brawley stressed. "I would never suggest to men that their wives not get pregnant so they don't get prostate cancer," he said. "Lack of fatherhood is not a strong preventive of prostate cancer."

Any relationship that does exist is probably very weak, Brawley said. "If there is a real correlation, I would like to know what the true cause is," he said. "I suspect we will never know."

More information

There's more on prostate cancer at the American Cancer Society.



SOURCES: Susan Harlap, M.D., professor, epidemiology, New York University, New York City; Otis Brawley, M.D., chief medical officer, American Cancer Society, Atlanta; Jan. 7, 2007, Cancer online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Farming, Fatherhood Hallmarks of Men Who Live to 100
2. Fatherhood linked to prostate cancer risk
3. Patients with Medicaid and those lacking insurance have higher risk of advanced laryngeal cancer
4. New Study Reports High Injury Rates for Hotel Workers, Even Higher Rates for Women and Nonwhites
5. Hushed Genes Might Mean Higher Lung Cancer Risk
6. Higher death rates in kidney patients with newly recognized disease
7. Vulnerable groups are not at higher risk of physician-assisted death
8. Study Determines Breast-Specific Gamma Imaging Has Higher Specificity Than MRI in Patients With Equivocal Mammograms
9. In birds, expecting to mate leads to higher fertilization rates
10. COPD rates, higher than expected in China, will continue to grow
11. Caesarean births pose higher risks for mother and baby
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Fatherhood Tied to Higher Prostate Cancer Risk
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... The Radiology Business Management Association (RBMA) ... annual awards, now in their 12th year, are among the most prestigious in radiology ... 2016, the awards were retooled to recognize achievements in both large budget (over $5,000) ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... Arizona (PRWEB) , ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... Healing Center, Sedona, Arizona’s Premier Center for Shamanic Healing and Spiritual Awakening, ... Luis Delgado, June 9--24, 2017. This sacred and spiritual journey during the ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... ... The law firm of Enea, Scanlan & Sirignano, LLP, with ... C. Enea has joined the firm as an associate attorney. Ms. Enea, who previously ... law, Medicaid planning and applications, and Wills, Trusts and Estates. Samantha A. Lyons, ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... “Finding Christ Through Social ... devotional journal chronicling the writer’s path toward true communion with God. “Finding Christ ... #TruthwithGrace” is the creation of published author Lea Michelle Johnson, a follower of ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... In 2016 the World Health Organization ... could be four million Zika-related cases in the Americas within the next year. Lyme ... cases reported per year skyrocketing to an estimated 329,000. Yet, Zika, Lyme and other ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... YORK , March 24, 2017 ... ... a leading publisher of cannabis market research, the legal cannabis ... percent CAGR through 2021, despite conflicting signals from the current ... points out that the two biggest drivers of growth in ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... report to their offering. ... The Deep Learning: Drug Discovery and Diagnostics Market, 2017-2035 ... market of deep learning solutions within the healthcare domain. Primarily driven ... a novel solution to generate relevant insights from medical data. ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... -- Today Stock-Callers.com have issued research reports on ... (NASDAQ: NVCN), Hologic Inc. (NASDAQ: HOLX), Edwards Lifesciences Corp. (NYSE: ... These companies are part of the Healthcare sector, which gave ... rd , 2017, with the NYSE Health Care Index declining ... in the S&P 500 were down about 0.4% as a ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: