Navigation Links
Family History of Alcoholism May Raise Obesity Risk
Date:1/3/2011

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) People at higher risk for alcoholism might also face higher odds of becoming obese, new study findings show.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis analyzed data from two large U.S. alcoholism surveys conducted in 1991-1992 and 2001-2002. According to the results of the more recent survey, women with a family history of alcoholism were 49 percent more likely to be obese than other women.

Men with a family history of alcoholism were also more likely to be obese, but this association was not as strong in men as in women, said first author Richard A. Grucza, an assistant professor of psychiatry.

One explanation for the increased risk of obesity among people with a family history of alcoholism could be that some people substitute one addiction for another. For example, after a person sees a close relative with a drinking problem, they may avoid alcohol but consume high-calorie foods that stimulate the same reward centers in the brain that react to alcohol, Grucza suggested.

In their analysis of the data from both surveys, the researchers found that the link between family history of alcoholism and obesity has grown stronger over time. This may be due to the increasing availability of foods that interact with the same brain areas as alcohol.

"Much of what we eat nowadays contains more calories than the food we ate in the 1970s and 1980s, but it also contains the sorts of calories -- particularly a combination of sugar, salt and fat -- that appeal to what are commonly called the reward centers in the brain," Grucza, explained in a university news release. "Alcohol and drugs affect those same parts of the brain, and our thinking was that because the same brain structures are being stimulated, overconsumption of those foods might be greater in people with a predisposition to addiction."

The study is published in the December issue of the journal Archives of General Psychiatry.

"In addiction research, we often look at what we call cross-heritability, which addresses the question of whether the predisposition to one condition also might contribute to other conditions," Grucza said. "For example, alcoholism and drug abuse are cross-heritable. This new study demonstrates a cross-heritability between alcoholism and obesity, but it also says -- and this is very important -- that some of the risks must be a function of the environment. The environment is what changed between the 1990s and the 2000s. It wasn't people's genes."

But, Grucza added, "Ironically, people with alcoholism tend not to be obese. They tend to be malnourished, or at least under-nourished because many replace their food intake with alcohol. One might think that the excess calories associated with alcohol consumption could, in theory, contribute to obesity, but that's not what we saw in these individuals."

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has more about family history.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, news release, Dec. 29, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Holidays With Clan Ideal for Investigating Family Health History
2. Study finds family acceptance of LGBT youth protects against depression, substance abuse, suicide
3. Richard Call Family Endowed Chair honors Dr. Yves DeClerck at the Saban Research Institute Symposium
4. Hospitals introduce family-activated rapid response programs
5. Family Members Caring for Veterans Sacrifice Their Own Health, Jobs
6. Studies validate use of family health history as gold standard in disease risk assessment
7. Autism Consortium 2010 Symposium: New therapeutics focus, family resource guide announced
8. Dads Family History of Breast, Ovarian Cancer Matters, Too
9. Even women with a family history can control breast cancer risk
10. University of Miami receives grant to increase the number of family nurse practitioners
11. Anorexic Teens May Gain From Whole-Family Treatment
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Family History of Alcoholism May Raise Obesity Risk
(Date:6/27/2016)... Lafayette, California (PRWEB) , ... ... ... a pioneer in the patient payment industry today announced its strategic partnership ... and health system workflows. , The two companies’ proven, proprietary technology combine ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... Quality metrics are proliferating in cancer ... they remain in the eye of the beholder, according to experts who offered insights ... American Journal of Managed Care. For the full issue, click here . , ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... North Carolina (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... release of a new product that was developed to enhance the health of felines. ... for centuries. , The two main herbs in the PawPaws Cat Kidney Support ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... and applications at AcademyHealth’s Annual Research Meeting June 26-28, 2016, at the Hynes ... important health care topics including advance care planning, healthcare costs and patient and ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With 30 hand-drawn hand gesture animations, ... Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProHand Cartoon’s package transforms ... Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand generator and drag it above ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016  MedSource announced today ... its e-clinical software solution of choice.  This latest ... possible value to their clients by offering a ... preferred relationship establishes nowEDC as the EDC platform ... MedSource,s full-service clients.  "nowEDC has long been a ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Any dentist who has made an implant supported ... Many of them do not even offer this as a ... laboratory costs involved. And those who ARE able to offer ... high cost that the majority of today,s patients would not ... Zadeh , founder of Dental Evolutions Inc. and inventor of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... startling report released today, National Safety Council research shows ... plan to eliminate prescription opioid overdoses. Prescription Nation ... the worst drug crisis in recorded U.S. history, assigned a "Making ... , New Mexico , Tennessee ... states, three – Michigan , Missouri ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: