Navigation Links
Facial asymmetry persists despite surgery to correct congenital deformity

PROVIDENCE, R.I. Adults and teens that underwent surgery as infants to correct a congenital condition that causes the forehead and face to appear uneven still have a degree of facial asymmetry years later, according to new research led by a Hasbro Childrens Hospital surgeon.

The study, published in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, focused on unilateral coronal synostosis, a type of craniosynostosis, in which the bones of the skull on one side of the head fuse prematurely. Craniosynostosis, or early fusion of the cranial sutures, affects 1 in 2000 live births. During corrective surgery, known as fronto-orbital advancement, surgeons remove and reshape the bones of the forehead and upper eye sockets, replacing them in a more normal anatomic position. This is typically performed during infancy.

Although there appears to be some lingering asymmetry years after many of these patients underwent corrective surgery, most patients and their families dont notice these differences, which do not appear to pose any significant health risks, said lead author Albert Oh, M.D., director of the craniofacial surgery program at Hasbro Childrens Hospital. Nevertheless, its important that we understand more about this asymmetry, which could lead to improvements of the operation and further our knowledge regarding the cause of craniosynostosis.

Oh, whos also an assistant professor in the department of surgery at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, led this research while at Childrens Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School.

In the study, Oh and colleagues used three-dimensional photo technology known as photogrammetry to digitally measure the faces of adult and adolescent patients with unilateral coronal synostosis who had undergone corrective surgery during infancy. They focused on different measurements comparing one side of the face to the other.

The researchers observed that average measurements on the side of the face affected by unilateral coronal synostosis were invariably shorter in comparison to the opposite side. They also found consistent rotation of the nose and facial midline away from the side of the fusion. Interestingly, the severity of long-term postoperative facial symmetry did not depend on either age at surgery or age at follow-up.

While this study conclusively documented persistent postoperative facial asymmetry, our study group of 15 patients was relatively small. What is really needed is a long-term prospective study comparing preoperative and postoperative facial measurements, said Oh.


Contact: Jessica Collins Grimes

Related medicine news :

1. Breakthrough Acai Berry Anti-Aging Facial Applies Benefits of Natures Super-Food to the Skin
2. New Technology and Improved Techniques Arm Dermatologists With Tools to Minimize Facial Scars From Skin Cancer Surgery
3. Facial Deformity Danger?
4. Facial expressions have greater impact on kids with bipolar disorder
5. In-the-Field Facial Surgery Helps Injured Troops in Iraq
6. HIV persists in the gut despite long-term HIV therapy
7. Chronic infection persists by targeting stromal cell network in lymphoid organs
8. Despite Oncologists Willingness to Prescribe Avastin for Treatment of Breast Cancer, the FDA is Likely to Rule Against the Product on February 23
9. Despite polarized opinions, Democrats and Republicans perform same amount of green actions
10. Physicians Still Hopeful About Desmoteplase for the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke Despite Negative Results
11. Herons persist in Chicago wetlands despite exposure to banned chemicals
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Dr. Thomas Dunlap and ... and Dr. Tucker Bierbaum with Emergency Medicine at St., Joseph Health System’s Santa ... and Sepsis conditions present in similar ways and require time-critical intervention to avoid large ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ON (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... of a real-time eReferral system for diagnostic imaging in the Waterloo region. Using ... BMD and Nuclear Medicine tests directly from their electronic medical record (EMR) without ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... Mass. (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... thorough second medical opinion process, participated in the 61st annual Employee Benefits Conference. ... Plans and took place Sunday, November 8th through Wednesday, November 11th, 2015. The ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 25, 2015 , ... As part of a global movement ... volunteers together who want to combine talents and resources to help create sustainable ... process. The non-profit launched its first major fundraiser on November 6, 2015 at ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Dr. John Pierce, Medical Director at the ... loss treatment with the Capillus272™ Pro laser therapy cap. FDA cleared for safety and ... hair, without the need for surgery, prescription pills, or topical foams. , “Capillus272™ ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015  The American ... and Gynecologists (ACOG), and the March of Dimes ... Protecting Our Infants Act of 2015 ... number of newborns born exposed to drugs, such ... the bill,s introduction, all three organizations have worked ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... On Tuesday, November 24, 2015, the ... Wright Medical Technology, Inc. for product liability and ... implant device, awarded $11 million in favor of ... and three days of deliberations, the jury found ... designed and unreasonably dangerous, and that Wright Medical ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... AVIV, Israel , November 25, 2015 ... (NASDAQ: KTOV ) (TASE: KTOV), a biopharmaceutical company ... simultaneous treatment of various clinical conditions, today announced the ... 3,158,900 American Depository Shares ( ADSs ), each representing ... purchase up to 3,158,900 ADSs. The ADSs and warrants ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: