Navigation Links
FDA BPA decision is a step forward, but more needs to happen, says MU expert
Date:1/19/2010

COLUMBIA, Mo. Today, the FDA shifted its stance on bisphenol A (BPA) and said that exposure to the chemical is of "some concern" for infants and children. Previously, the agency's stance was the chemical posed no risk to humans; this stance was consistent with the chemical industry's stance. Today, FDA officials declared that more research was needed and suggested reasonable steps to reduce exposure to BPA. Frederick vom Saal, a University of Missouri scientist, says that this stance is a step forward but more steps need to be taken. Since 1997, research from vom Saal and other MU colleagues have shown adverse health effects of BPA at exposure levels below those currently considered safe by the FDA. Vom Saal has received more than $1 million of the $30 million that government agencies, including the NIH, have committed in the next 18 to 25 months to study the health risks of BPA exposure.

"The FDA formally acknowledging concern about BPA and working with NIH to incorporate research from outside of the chemical industry is a huge step forward," said vom Saal, who is a Curator's professor of biological sciences in MU's College of Arts and Science. "The FDA position presented today is consistent with the position that the National Toxicology Program made two years ago. Since then, considerable published research reaffirmed the health dangers of BPA. The FDA says they want to respond more quickly. Now, we will see if they are really able to respond to the huge amount of new science showing dangers not recognized two years ago. They should move quickly to restrict the use of by BPA in products used by adults as well as infants."

BPA is a one of the world's highest production-volume chemicals and has been used for 40 years to make hard plastic items, such as, drinking glasses, baby bottles, food-storage containers, the lining of food and beverage containers, and dental sealants. Previous studies have shown adverse health effects of BPA on the brain and reproductive system, as well as metabolic diseases in laboratory animals.

"The Japanese industry voluntarily removed BPA from can linings 10 years ago and thus, were able to reduce exposure to BPA by 50 percent," vom Saal said. "Last year, Congress asked companies in the United States to take similar actions; however, companies have made no move toward compliance. A huge problem facing the FDA is that it does not have the regulatory authority to even determine what products contain BPA, and Congress will have to pass new laws giving the FDA the authority it needs to regulate chemicals such as BPA."


'/>"/>

Contact: Kelsey Jackson
JacksonKN@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. K-State psychologists show that future-minded people make better decisions for their health
2. Skyscape Offers Medical Professionals Real Time Clinical Decision Application on Google Android
3. 5,000 deaths: A catastrophic, regrettable decision in Belgium
4. Labor Board Decision Puts Kaiser Workers Pay, Healthcare, Pensions in Jeopardy
5. Employers Plan to Increase Use of Self-Service Decision-Making Technology For Open Enrollment, Watson Wyatt Survey Finds
6. Elsevier Launches New Online ARRA Resource Center and Clinical Decision Support Blog
7. Computerized order entry/decision support systems: Effective solution to managing imaging utilization
8. Health Care Robots: Next Generation Decision-Making Software, Eliminates Manual Systems Labor
9. Halifax Regional Medical Center Selects Micromedex Solutions from Thomson Reuters for Clinical Decision Support
10. Mayo Clinic clinicians develop new decision aid tool to help type 2 diabetes patients
11. Mayo Clinic Clinicians Develop New Decision Aid Tool to Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... The ... today, as organizations, advocates, and individuals join together to increase recognition about the ... ultimately save lives. , “Today we mark a nationwide movement to raise awareness ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... A product of digesting a ... derive a heart-protective benefit from eating soy foods, while others do not, a University ... are able to produce equol—a substance made by some types of “good” gut bacteria ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... February 22, 2017 , ... Pet obesity ... and 54% of dogs, according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP). During ... key pet food issues such as the benefits of corn and grains, value of ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... 22, 2017 , ... In a recent article ... context (age, illness and life choices) should be dissociated from medical errors and ... In addition, all too often, studies regarding health system performance in other countries, ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... , ... February 21, 2017 , ... ... Nation Regional Medical Clinic in Durant, Oklahoma, on Feb. 21. , The celebration ... tours for community members, clinic employees, the construction team and tribal leadership. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/22/2017)... , Feb 22, 2017 Research and ... Market Analysis & Trends - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to ... The Global ... around 5.2% over the next decade to reach approximately $2.1 billion by ... and forecasts for all the given segments on global as well as ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... Calif. , Feb. 22, 2017  Applied Silver, the ... Barnes to the company,s advisory board. Ms. Barnes is ... joining business, advertising, engineering, legal, and healthcare experts Scott ... John Goodrich , J. Tress Ritter , and ... BSN, CIC, FAPIC brings more than three decades of nationally ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... 2017 Oncternal Therapeutics, Inc., a clinical-stage ... and common malignancies, today announced the closing of ... intends to use the proceeds to further clinical ... advance preclinical development of a new ROR1-targeted antibody-drug ... first-in-class anti-ROR1 monoclonal antibody being developed to treat ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: