Navigation Links
Everyday clairvoyance: How your brain makes near-future predictions
Date:8/17/2011

Every day we make thousands of tiny predictions when the bus will arrive, who is knocking on the door, whether the dropped glass will break. Now, in one of the first studies of its kind, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis are beginning to unravel the process by which the brain makes these everyday prognostications.

While this might sound like a boon to day traders, coaches and gypsy fortune tellers, people with early stages of neurological diseases such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases could someday benefit from this research. In these maladies, sufferers have difficulty segmenting events in their environment from the normal stream of consciousness that constantly surrounds them.

The researchers focused on the mid-brain dopamine system (MDS), an evolutionarily ancient system that provides signals to the rest of the brain when unexpected events occur. Using functional MRI (fMRI), they found that this system encodes prediction error when viewers are forced to choose what will happen next in a video of an everyday event.

Predicting the near future is vital in guiding behavior and is a key component of theories of perception, language processing and learning, says Jeffrey M. Zacks, PhD, WUSTL associate professor of psychology in Arts & Sciences and lead author of a paper on the study in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.

"It's valuable to be able to run away when the lion lunges at you, but it's super-valuable to be able to hop out of the way before the lion jumps," Zacks says. "It's a big adaptive advantage to look just a little bit over the horizon."

Zacks and his colleagues are building a theory of how predictive perception works. At the core of the theory is the belief that a good part of predicting the future is the maintenance of a mental model of what is happening now. Now and then, this model needs updating, especially when the environment changes unpredictably.

"When we watch everyday activity unfold around us, we make predictions about what will happen a few seconds out," Zacks says. "Most of the time, our predictions are right.

"Successfull predictions are associated with the subjective experience of a smooth stream of consciousness. But a few times a minute, our predictions come out wrong and then we perceive a break in the stream of consciousness, accompanied by an uptick in activity of primitive parts of the brain involved with the MDS that regulate attention and adaptation to unpredicted changes."

Zacks tested healthy young volunteers who were shown movies of everyday events such as washing a car, building a LEGO model or washing clothes. The movie would be watched for a while, and then it was stopped.

Participants then were asked to predict what would happen five seconds later when the movie was re-started by selecting a picture that showed what would happen, and avoiding similar pictures that did not correspond to what would happen.

Half of the time, the movie was stopped just before an event boundary, when a new event was just about to start. The other half of the time, the movie was stopped in the middle of an event. The researchers found that participants were more than 90 percent correct in predicting activity within the event, but less than 80 percent correct in predicting across the event boundary. They were also less confident in their predictions.

"This is the point where they are trying hardest to predict the future," Zacks says. "It's harder across the event boundary, and they know that they are having trouble. When the film is stopped, the participants are heading into the time when prediction error is starting to surge. That is, they are noting that a possible error is starting to happen. And that shakes their confidence. They're thinking, 'Do I really know what's going to happen next?' "

Zacks and his group were keenly interested in what the participants' brains were doing as they tried to predict into a new event.

In the functional MRI experiment, Zacks and his colleagues saw significant activity in several midbrain regions, among them the substantia nigra "ground zero for the dopamine signaling system" and in a set of nuclei called the striatum.

The substantia nigra, Zacks says, is the part of the brain hit hardest by Parkinson's disease, and is important for controlling movement and making adaptive decisions.

Brain activity in this experiment was revealed by fMRI at two critical points: when subjects tried to make their choice, and immediately after feedback on the correctness or incorrectness of their answers.

Mid-brain responses "really light up at hard times, like crossing the event boundary and when the subjects were told that they had made the wrong choice," Zacks says.

Zacks says the experiments provide a "crisp test" of his laboratory's prediction theory. They also offer hope of targeting these prediction-based updating mechanisms to better diagnose early stage neurological diseases and provide tools to help patients.


'/>"/>

Contact: Gerry Everding
gerry_everding@wustl.edu
314-935-6375
Washington University in St. Louis
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Most Holiday Injuries to Kids Spurred by Everyday Mishaps
2. When Earth Day Is Everyday At The Office, Used Office Furniture Recycling
3. Its the little things: Everyday gratitude as a booster shot for romantic relationships
4. The Rubit Dog Tag Clips Making Big Pet Store Sales, Everyday Dog Ownership Easier, Preventing Broken Fingernails.
5. Everyday Exercise Can Help Kids With Cystic Fibrosis: Study
6. Satisfaction with the components of everyday life appears protective against heart disease
7. Gadgets not related to teenagers brain pain
8. Dementia Rates Escalate as Brain Capacity Diminishes with Age
9. Researchers discover new way to kill pediatric brain tumors
10. Scientists Pinpoint Area of Brain That Fears Losing Money
11. Physical Changes in Brain Linked to Altered Spirituality
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Everyday clairvoyance: How your brain makes near-future predictions 
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... Ogden Clinic, the largest ... centric payment system, to expand its focus on patient care by providing an ... , “At Ogden Clinic, we are working to become a different type ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... , ... March 23, 2017 , ... “The Trainer”: ... of published author, Scotty, a fiction writer with an active imagination and an enthusiasm ... new book follows the tale of Wild Bill Hart, who sat looking at the ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... Vortex Biosciences, provider ... protein expression in circulating tumor cells using microfluidic western blotting” in Nature Communications ... Vortex technology to capture CTCs and a microfluidic single-CTC resolution Western ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 22, 2017 , ... ... publication of the first issue of its companion print magazine. The new magazine, ... cosmetic surgery thanks to information provided by board-certified doctors from across the country. ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 22, 2017 , ... Sam & Associates Insurance ... planning, and related services to residents of the region, is embarking on a ... species and wild lands. , Endangered Species International is committed to ending the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... , March 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ - INVICTUS MD ... IVITF; FRA: 8IS) Invictus MD announces that AB Laboratories ... in its licensed production facility under the Access to ... Hamilton, Ontario . The ... in October 2016, is currently operating at half capacity, ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017 Piramal Pharma ... anuncia el nombramiento de Stuart E. Needleman ... de servicios integrados completa para su base de ... clave en el crecimiento y ejecución de las ... de impulsar todas las actividades de desarrollo empresarial ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... TEL AVIV, Israel, March 23, 2017  Galmed ... or the "Company"), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused ... for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, or NASH, ... for the three and twelve months ended December 31, ... recently completed pre-clinical studies demonstrating Aramchol™,s potential direct ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: