Navigation Links
Even a Little Exercise Helps the Heart, Study Finds
Date:8/1/2011

By Jenifer Goodwin
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Go for a walk after dinner. Play tag with your kids at the park.

New research shows that even small amounts of exercise -- about 150 minutes, or 2.5 hours, of moderate activity a week -- can reduce the risk of heart disease by about 14 percent.

Those who did more -- about 300 minutes a week, or five hours -- reduced their risk of heart disease, including heart attacks, angina and bypass surgeries, by 20 percent compared to people who did no exercise, the study found.

"Some physical activity is better than none, and more is better," said lead study author Jacob Sattelmair, who was a doctoral candidate at Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston, when he conducted the research.

The benefits of even more exercise continue to add up. People who reported exercising for 750 minutes a week, or 12.5 hours -- had a 25 percent reduced risk of heart disease. But that's many more hours of working out for only a small additional risk reduction, Sattelmair noted.

"The biggest bang for your buck is at the lower ends of physical activity," said Sattelmair, now director of research and strategy at Dossia, an organization in Cambridge, Mass., whose goal is to improve employee health and health care, while reducing health care costs. "If you went from none to 2.5 hours a week, the relative benefit is more than if you went from, say, 5 to 7.5 hours a week."

In the study, published online Aug. 1 in Circulation, Sattelmair and colleagues analyzed the results of 33 studies that assessed the health benefits of exercise.

For reasons researchers aren't sure of, women saw even more protective benefits from exercise than men, although this could have been a quirk of the statistics, they said.

While 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise a week is the minimum goal based on current U.S. guidelines, they found even people who did less than that (75 minutes weekly) had a decreased risk of heart disease compared to total coach potatoes.

"If you are doing nothing, do something. And if you are doing something, say, walking 10 or 15 minutes, two to three times a week, do more," said Barry Franklin, director of the preventive cardiology program at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., and an American Heart Association spokesman.

Moderate physical activity includes walking briskly, gardening, playing doubles tennis or dancing. Vigorous activity includes jogging, swimming laps, hiking uphill or jumping rope, although researchers did not analyze whether or not exercising vigorously was any better than moderate exercise for improving heart health.

Prior research has pointed to myriad benefits of physical activity, Franklin said. Getting up and moving strengthens the heart and the lungs.

Physically fit people also tend to have lower blood pressure and resting heart rate, which puts less demand on the heart. Exercise can increase insulin sensitivity, which is important in the prevention of diabetes, and can modestly boost HDL ("good") cholesterol.

Other studies suggest that exercise reduces inflammatory markers that may play a role in triggering heart attacks; may reduce the likelihood of clots that lead to heart attacks and stroke; and decreases the risk of life-threatening arrhythmias (irregular heart beat).

Yet physical activity, of course, isn't the sole key to preventing heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. Eating a healthy diet, maintaining a normal body weight, avoiding high levels of stress, and keeping blood pressure and cholesterol levels in a healthy range all play a role, he added.

Just as important as an exercise program is getting physical activity while going about your day, Franklin said. Recent research has suggested that it's not only structured exercise classes or sessions, but the incidental exercise you get when you walk around the mall, go up and down the stairs, clean the house, or mow the lawn that matters for health.

"In addition to your structured exercise program, where you drive to the gym and walk on the treadmill, disguised exercise can also have a profound impact on your cardiovascular risk," Franklin said. "The take-home message is: Move more. Sit less."

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has tips for starting an exercise program.

SOURCES: Jacob Sattelmair, Sc.D., director of research and strategy, Dossia, Cambridge, Mass.; Barry Franklin, Ph.D., director, preventive cardiology program, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Mich.; Aug. 1, 2011, Circulation, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. For Valentine's Day, Lifestyle Correspondent and Her Two Sets of Twins Show a Little Love Where Its Needed the Most
2. Reno Children With Disabilities Profit From a Little Known but Internationally Recognized Non-Profit Organization as it Quietly Crosses the $200,000.00 Mark in Service Investment Into the Reno Area
3. Secretary Clintons Approach to Development: Good Rhetoric, Little Action?
4. Experts Say Its Not So Bad to Go a Little Mad
5. Little City Foundation Battles for Rights of Individuals with Disabilities in Springfield and Meets with Legislators Day Before Governors Budget Address
6. Newer Genetic Info Adds Little to Predicting Breast Cancer
7. Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
8. A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
9. Anti-aging hormones: Little or no benefit and the risks are high
10. Registration Now Open for Little Red Door's Unite 2 Fight Race Against Prostate Cancer Saturday, July 10, 2010
11. Clifford Power Systems, Inc. Celebrates 25th Anniversary with 7th location in Little Rock, Arkansas
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Even a Little Exercise Helps the Heart, Study Finds
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... 11, 2016 , ... Husted Kicking has completed its Third Annual ... 6th & 7th, 2016 according to kicking coach Michael Husted. , “This event serves ... NFL’s combine in Indianapolis,” says Husted. “The NFL uses a third party organization to ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... the ability of Medicare Advantage organizations to deliver medical services via telehealth, estimated ... “ATA has been advocating for such language for many years. Although there ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, ... ... Associates, Inc. , a full-service health care communications company offering education, research ... news resource for practitioners and specialists working in infectious diseases. , As ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... NASHVILLE, Tenn. (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 ... ... by the American Academy of Emergency Medicine , an emergency medicine ... of practice management services . , The American Academy of Emergency Medicine, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... announces that his office is now offering a variety of comprehensive procedures for ... enhancement, eyebrow lift, facial volume restoration, lip enhancement and nasal reshaping. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... 10, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - The President of New Venture ... release of an anti-radiation product from their Research ... in the treatment of cancer using radiation and ... assist in the healing of radiation burns, even ... protect only the healthy cells from radiation damage. ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ALSP, Inc. announced that it has appointed Col.(Retired) Dallas ... preparation for its move into clinical trials with its lead ... are pleased to welcome Dallas Hack onto the ... of such practical knowledge and far-reaching experience in Traumatic Brain ... broad experience and success as a clinician and researcher in ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Mo. , Feb. 10, 2016 ... industry, recently identified an industry-wide trend regarding the ... that allows organizations to efficiently deliver compelling sales ... in 2011 and another in 2015, Intouch uncovered ... with tablet devices and DSAs, many are not ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: