Navigation Links
Even Mild Depression, Anxiety Hurts the Heart: Study
Date:8/1/2012

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Even mild depression or anxiety may raise your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease and other causes, according to British researchers.

And the greater the level of psychological distress, the higher the odds of death from heart disease, the researchers say.

"The fact that an increased risk of mortality was evident, even at low levels of psychological distress, should prompt research into whether treatment of these very common, minor symptoms can reduce this increased risk of death," said lead researcher Tom Russ, a clinical research fellow at the Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Center of the University of Edinburgh.

For the study, published online July 31 in BMJ, Russ and colleagues analyzed 10 studies of men and women enrolled in the Health Survey for England from 1994 to 2004. Data on more than 68,000 adults aged 35 and older was included overall.

Each study looked for connections between chronic psychological distress and the risk of dying from heart disease and other causes, including cancer.

Pooling data in this way is called a meta-analysis. In such a study, researchers look for common patterns across several studies.

Over eight years' follow-up, the researchers found even very mild depression or anxiety -- subclinical levels -- raised the risk of all-cause death, including cardiovascular disease, by 20 percent. Looking specifically at death from heart disease, mild psychological distress raised this risk 29 percent, the study found.

For the highest level of depression or anxiety, the risk of all-cause death rose 94 percent, the researchers found.

Risk of death from cancer was increased 9 percent in cases of very severe depression or anxiety, the investigators found. Lower levels of psychological distress were not associated with increased risk of cancer death.

An individual's actual risk of death remains small, however, and people shouldn't assume they are doomed to an early death if they suffer from a psychological disorder.

Dr. Glyn Lewis, a professor of psychiatric epidemiology at the University of Bristol in England and author of an accompanying journal editorial, said evidence linking stress to heart disease continues to mount.

"If we can reduce the psychological impact, then this should reduce the biological response," he said. But how to accomplish that remains a puzzle.

A type of psychological treatment called cognitive behavioral therapy is designed to help people change the way they respond to potentially stressful events, Lewis said. Cognitive behavioral therapy teaches patients to change their thinking about situations and to react less emotionally.

"This might help people with [clinical] depression, but there is no evidence that this might help the much larger numbers of people who have low-level symptoms that are below the diagnostic threshold for depression," he said.

While antidepressants might improve depression, previous studies have linked their use to greater risk of heart disease, according to background research in the study. About 7.5 percent of United Kingdom residents have depression and anxiety disorders, Lewis said.

Changing this stress-disease dynamic might also involve keeping common risk factors for cardiovascular disease in check, another expert said.

Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, said many studies have demonstrated an association between depression and anxiety and cardiovascular events, cardiovascular deaths and all-cause mortality.

But so far, no evidence has shown that treating depression or anxiety reduces the risk of heart disease, Fonarow said.

Many different mechanisms may connect psychological distress to cardiovascular disease, including increased sympathetic nervous system activity, stress hormones such as cortisol, chronic inflammation, unhealthy lifestyle factors and inattention to early symptoms, he said.

"For people with depression or anxiety, focusing on proven cardiovascular risk factor interventions, including maintaining healthy blood pressure, body weight, cholesterol levels, engaging in regular exercise and not smoking, may represent the best course of action to lower their cardiovascular risk," he advised.

More information

For more information on cardiovascular disease, visit the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: Tom Russ, MRCPsych, clinical research fellow, Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Center, University of Edinburgh, Scotland; Glyn Lewis, M.B., Ph.D., professor of psychiatric epidemiology, University of Bristol, England; Gregg Fonarow, M.D., professor, cardiovascular medicine, University of California, Los Angeles; July 31, 2012, BMJ, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Spouses of severe-sepsis patients at high risk of depression, U-M study shows
2. Sleep Apnea Therapy Might Ease Depression, Too
3. Study: No link between depression, nasal obstruction
4. Depression, Anxiety Tied to Physical Disabilities in Seniors
5. Rutgers study: Anxiety disorders in poor moms likely to result from poverty, not mental illness
6. Phobic Anxiety May Link to Premature Aging
7. Math Anxiety Takes Bigger Toll on Girls: Study
8. When anxiety wont go away
9. beyondblue Launches Depression & Anxiety website and Info Line for Men
10. Anxiety, Depression May Raise Stroke Risk
11. Avatars may help children with social anxiety overcome fears
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Even Mild Depression, Anxiety Hurts the Heart: Study
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... Rollerblade®, the worldwide ... (ABT), an innovative braking system that allows skaters of all levels to stop ... the biggest concerns of beginner and intermediate skaters – learning how to brake ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... 18, 2017 , ... Floundering on New Year’s resolutions? Need an excuse to ... a reset. The U.S. Apple Association agrees and recommends starting each day with ... contribute to heart disease. , The U.S. Apple Association – which represents apple growers ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... ... Anesthesia Progress – Everyone wants less pain during dental surgery, but ... patient. Dentists have several general anesthesia alternatives and finding the right option can result ... College in Tokyo, Japan wanted to find out which anesthetic was the better choice ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... ... of difference. Eden Activewear is a stand-out company for several differences from other ... and only manufacture on demand, this is called 'Agile' manufacturing - http://www.leanproduction.com/agile-manufacturing.html ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... Today, to help those who ... powerfully uplifting interview with medical expert and prolific author, Dr. Bernie Siegel. ... tough times, Dr. Bernie Siegel energizes listeners to live life with intrigue, magic ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/17/2017)... Israel , January 17, 2017 Management ... TyrNovo, Ltd.   KIT-302 Development On Track For ... FDA in Q1 2017   ... Kitov Pharmaceuticals Holdings Ltd. (NASDAQ: KTOV ; ... update call on Monday, January 23 rd at 8:30am Eastern Time to ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... 17, 2017  Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc (Nasdaq: JAZZ ... enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial comparing the ... (BSC) in the prevention of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) ... transplant (HSCT) who are at high risk or at ... trial will be conducted across approximately 100 medical centers ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... Calif. , Jan. 17, 2017  Edwards Lifesciences ... in patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease and critical ... the quarter ended December 31, 2016 after the market ... a conference call at 5:00 p.m. ET that day ... the conference call, dial (877) 407-8037 or (201) 689-8037.  ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: