Navigation Links
Estrogen treatment may help reverse severe pulmonary hypertension
Date:9/15/2011

UCLA researchers have found that the hormone estrogen may help reverse advanced pulmonary hypertension, a rare and serious condition that affects 2 to 3 million individuals in the U.S., mostly women, and can lead to heart failure.

The condition causes a progressive increase in blood pressure in the main pulmonary artery, which originates in the heart's right ventricle and delivers blood to the lungs. The rise in pressure impairs heart function by enlarging the right ventricle, potentially leading to heart failure.

Published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the preclinical study shows that in rats, estrogen treatment can reverse the progression of pulmonary hypertension to heart failure and can restore lung and ventricle structure and function.

The disease progresses slowly, so most patients don't seek treatment until major symptoms occur, such as shortness of breath, dizziness and fainting. According to researchers, current medication for pulmonary hypertension only temporarily reduces the disease's severity. For advanced pulmonary hypertension, there are fewer options, and the condition often necessitates a lung transplant.

"Unfortunately, up until now, there hasn't been an ideal pharmacological therapy to treat advanced pulmonary hypertension," said senior study author Mansoureh Eghbali, Ph.D., an assistant professor of anesthesiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA who has a strong background in studying the role of gender and estrogen in cardiovascular diseases. "We hope that this early study may offer insight into new therapies."

The UCLA team found that by treating rats with severe pulmonary hypertension with low doses of estrogen, they were able to prevent the disease from progressing to right-ventricular heart failure; this did not happen in untreated rats.

Systolic blood pressure and ejection fraction the volume of blood being pumped out of the heart's right chamber with each heart beat also improved. Tests showed that lung weight, which can increase with the disease and resulting heart-ventricle enlargement, was also corrected. After 10 days of estrogen treatment, function returned to an almost normal state.

The researchers stopped the estrogen therapy after 10 days but continued to observe some of the treated rats. They tracked the continued improvement and found almost full restoration of systolic blood pressure and ejection fraction to normal levels after an additional 12 days.

"We were surprised to find this continued benefit, even after we stopped the estrogen treatment," said the study's first author, Dr. Soban Umar, a UCLA Department of Anesthesiology researcher who has studied pulmonary hypertension and right-ventricular heart failure and is a key member of Eghbali's laboratory team. "These findings suggest that even short-term estrogen therapy may suffice to reverse the disease."

All rats with severe pulmonary hypertension that were treated with estrogen survived by the study's end. Only 25 percent of the untreated rats survived.

The team also explored how estrogen could work in reversing the disease by studying several cellular and molecular mechanisms.

They found that the number of inflammatory cells in rats with pulmonary hypertension increased five-fold, compared with normal rats. In the animals treated with estrogen, this was reversed to normal. The team found that estrogen reduced regulation of a pro-inflammatory gene that also plays a key role in disease development caused by pulmonary hypertension. They also found that estrogen had an inhibitory effect on lung fibrosis.

In addition, the team observed that estrogen therapy restored blood vessels in the lungs and right ventricle whose loss is associated with the disease.

Further study identified that estrogen exerts its biological effects on pulmonary hypertension through a receptor called estrogen receptor beta, a protein that regulates estrogen's activity in the body.

"Estrogen appears to work through an interplay of several factors, including suppression of lung inflammation and fibrosis, as well as reversal of ventricle enlargement," Eghbali said. "We may be able to utilize estrogen receptor beta in the development of future therapies to stimulate estrogen activity to treat pulmonary hypertension."

Researchers had also tested estrogen receptor alpha, the other receptor that controls estrogen activity, but found that it wasn't as effective in treating pulmonary hypertension.

Eghbali added that estrogen receptor beta may prove to be a favorable therapeutic target, since this receptor may require only a short treatment duration and low dosage and has less pro-estrogenic effects on the breasts and uterus than estrogen receptor alpha.

Pulmonary hypertension affects mostly younger women, despite the fact that females in this age group should be under the protective benefits of natural estrogen produced by the body, Eghbali said.

"These patients may have a genetic mutation that is interfering in how estrogen receptor beta directs estrogen activity that is leading to pulmonary hypertension," she said.

Her team's next step is to explore these genetic questions. Currently, Umar and Eghbali are collaborating with UCLA pulmonary hypertension physicians to investigate gender-related issues and to define the role of estrogen in patients with this deadly disease.


'/>"/>

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. PET scans confirm effectiveness of estrogen-blocking drugs in breast cancer patients
2. Johns Hopkins researchers discover how some breast cancers alter their sensitivity to estrogen
3. Dana-Farber study finds new points of attack on breast cancers not fueled by estrogen
4. Roadmap published for dynamic mapping of estrogen signaling in breast cancer
5. Anorexic girls have increased bone density after physiological estrogen treatment
6. New study suggests link between estrogen exposure, high blood pressure
7. Estrogens Role in Breast Cancer Can Fluctuate
8. Estrogen treatment with no side-effects in sight
9. Risks of Estrogen Hormone Therapy Seen to Fade After Treatment Ends
10. Longer-term follow-up of users of estrogen therapy finds some changes in risks
11. Caution for estrogen therapy after hysterectomy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Estrogen treatment may help reverse severe pulmonary hypertension
(Date:5/30/2016)... ... May 30, 2016 , ... "This ... FCPX," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , TransPack ... Cut Pro X. Choose from abstract transitions to more simple wipes with blur ...
(Date:5/29/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Whole Health Supply is happy to announce the favorable reception ... Amazon.com. This new style of nail clipper has a wider jaw opening that is ... and the actual handle is 2.5mm thick to accommodate the cutting force. This is ...
(Date:5/28/2016)... ... May 28, 2016 , ... "Color Grading media can be ... a preset onto their media," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... quickly and easily add stylish color grades to their footage. A LUT is a ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... , ... May 27, 2016 , ... More than a ... it is not surprising that bariatric surgery has received increased attention in recent years, ... Of course, when it comes to weight loss, most people are familiar with the ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 27, 2016 , ... An influential ... for a third time to shed lights on the variety of topics detailing why ... stories, “Nurse Appreciation” tackles why this career has gone from being in a major ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/27/2016)... , May 27, 2016 ... innovative biopharmaceutical company focused on late-stage drug development, ... Dexcel Pharma of pivotal batches required for ... Drug Administration (FDA). This follows Kitov,s announcement ... III trial successfully met its primary efficacy endpoint. ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... 2016 TARE (Transarterial Radio-embolization) ... Savings and Overall Decreased Use of Hospital ... international specialist healthcare company, has today announced the ... Meeting of ISPOR (International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and ... (HCC) using yttrium-90 glass microspheres is associated with ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... GERMANTOWN, Maryland , May 25, 2016 ... bedient dringenden Bedarf zur ... QIAGEN N.V. (NASDAQ: QGEN ; Frankfurt ... und Entwicklungsvereinbarung mit Therawis Diagnostics GmbH zur Entwicklung ... zu sein. Ein erstes Projekt wird die Entwicklung ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: