Navigation Links
Epilepsy genes may cancel each other
Date:11/4/2007

Inheriting two genetic mutations that can individually cause epilepsy might actually be seizure-protective, said Baylor College of Medicine researchers in a report that appears online today in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

In the genetics of the brain, two wrongs can make a right, said Dr. Jeffrey L. Noebels, professor of neurology, neuroscience and molecular and human genetics at BCM. We believe these findings have great significance to clinicians as we move toward relying upon genes to predict neurological disease.

In addition, the finding might point the way to new ways of treating epilepsy using gene-directed therapy.

If you have a potassium channel defect, then a drug blocking certain calcium channels might also benefit you, said Noebels.

Noebels and his colleagues, who included first author Dr. Ed Glasscock, a post-doctoral researcher at BCM, tested this hypothesis by breeding mice with two defective genes that govern ion channels, tiny pores in cells that allow molecules such as potassium and calcium to flow in and out.

The genes were known to cause epilepsy when inherited singly within families. They have also been found in a large-scale screen of people with non-familial seizure disorders being performed in collaboration with the Baylor Human Genome Sequencing Center.

One is a mutation in the Kcna1 gene involved in the channel that allows potassium to flow in and out of the cell. It causes severe seizures affecting the brains temporal lobe, an area of the brain involved in processing sight, sound, speech and forming memories. It can also cause sudden death in young mice.

The other mutation is in a calcium channel gene (Cacna1a) that causes a specific type of seizure associated with absence epilepsy. When people suffer these seizures, they may appear to be staring into space and do not exhibit the jerking or movements generally associated with epilepsy.

When both types of mutation occurred in the same young mouse, that animal had dramatically reduced seizures and did not suffer the sudden death associated with the potassium channel problem.

Noebels, who is also director of the Developmental Neurogenetics Laboratory funded by the National Institutes of Health and Blue Bird Circle Foundation, said, Rather than screening for bad genes one at a time, it may be essential to create a complete profile of many or even all genes in order to accurately assess the true genetic risk of any single defect in many common disorders such as epilepsy. Fortunately, this amount of background information will soon become routinely obtainable in individual patients thanks to rapid technological progress in the field of neurogenomics.

Many different genes can lead to seizure disorders. In some cases, they encode ion channels that adjust the way neurons fire. Previous work indicated that combinations of such genes could make epilepsy worse. However, certain combinations may actually prevent the abnormal patterns of epilepsy, acting as circuit breakers, said Noebels.


'/>"/>

Contact: Graciela Gutierrez
ggutierr@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. General Anesthesia Safe For Children On Ketogenic Diet Suffering From Epilepsy
2. Researchers Scale to assess the Severity of Epilepsy in Kids
3. Inadequate epilepsy treatment
4. Music in link with epilepsy
5. Caffeine can induce epilepsy in newborns
6. Epilepsy can be predicted
7. Epilepsy Drugs Can Enhance Risk of Birth Defects
8. Lamictal as add-on therapy for children with epilepsy
9. Epilepsy Drug Helps Diabetic Nerve Damage
10. Study to look at early surgery to treat epilepsy
11. Epilepsy Drug May Relieve Chronic Headaches
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... giving viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of "Success Files," ... on current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with passion and ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 12, 2017 , ... First Healthcare Compliance (FHC), an industry ... a range of technology and learning solutions at the 68th Annual American Healthcare ... be held October 14–18, 2017 at the Mandalay Bay Resort in Las Vegas, ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ( https://isocomforter.com ... the introduction of an innovative new design of the shoulder pad. The shoulder ... maximum comfort while controlling your pain while using cold therapy. By utilizing ice and ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Dr. Parsa Mohebi, the Los ... article to the newly revamped Cosmetic Town journal section, featuring articles ... procedure known as Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). , Dr. Mohebi says ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... Mich. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... has been named one of Michigan’s 2017 Best and Brightest in Wellness® by ... Brightest in Wellness® awards program on Friday, Oct. 20 from 7:30 a.m. to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/23/2017)... , Sept. 22, 2017 Janssen Biotech, Inc. ... response letter from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... of sirukumab for the treatment of moderately to severely ... additional clinical data are needed to further evaluate the ... severely active RA. ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... -- AVACEN Medical (AVACEN) announced that its CE-Marked AVACEN ... with the widespread pain associated with fibromyalgia in the ... Essex, England commented, "I had difficulty ... sleep at all, tremendous pain, with every movement sending ... AVACEN 100] enough, how this has and is helping ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... , Sept. 19, 2017   ZirMed Inc ., ... analytics, today announced that it has been ranked #1 by ... Black Book™ Rankings 2017 User Survey. ZirMed was recognized ... for large hospitals and medical centers over 200 beds and ... Book,s healthcare technology user survey history. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: