Navigation Links
Electronic medical records lower infant mortality, study finds
Date:5/18/2011

Expanded use of electronic medical records would substantially reduce infant mortality in the U.S., according to a study forthcoming in the Journal of Political Economy.

A 10 percent increase in hospital use of basic electronic records would save 16 babies for every 100,000 live births, the study found. A complete national transition to electronic records would save an estimated 6,400 infants each year in the U.S.

Many health professionals have advocated electronic records as a way to improve care and curb costs. For obstetricians, electronic records might make it easier to identify high risk pregnancies and coordinate care. However, until now there had been surprisingly little empirical data to support those assumptions, according to the study's authors, Amalia Miller of the University of Virginia and the RAND Corporation and Catherine Tucker of the MIT Sloan School of Management.

"This paper offers evidence that suggests cautious optimism about the potential value of [electronic records] in improving neonatal health outcomes and current health policy that is directed towards increasing the spread of these technologies," the researchers write.

In addition to improving care, electronic records would be cost-effective compared to other healthcare interventions, the research found. Miller and Tucker estimate the cost of saving one baby through electronic medical records to be about $531,000. By comparison, a large expansion in Medicaid coverage for children in the 1980s cost about $840,000 per life saved.

The study compared infant death rates at hospitals with and without electronic records in more than 2,500 U.S. counties over 12 years. The extensive data set allowed the researchers to control for other factors that may influence infant mortality, such as a county's socioeconomic status.

Each year 18,000 babies die in the U.S. within 28 days of birth. That places the U.S. 43rd worldwide in infant mortality rateon par with nations like Slovakia and Montenegro and behind most of the European Union. Slow adoption of electronic records compared to other industrial nations is playing a substantial role in the low U.S. ranking, the study suggests.

It also suggests that the $19.2 billion earmarked for electronic records in the 2009 economic stimulus package was money well spent. "These findings provide an empirical basis for government policy intervention to hasten the diffusion of healthcare [information technology]," the researchers conclude.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kstacey@press.uchicago.edu
773-834-0386
University of Chicago Press Journals
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Electronic medical records improve quality of care in resource-limited countries
2. Using Electronics Before Bed May Hamper Sleep
3. Surgical instruments with electronic serial numbers
4. Study finds that electronic fetal heart rate monitoring greatly reduces infant mortality
5. Electronic cigarettes hold promise as aid to quitting
6. CeBIT 2011: Electronic fitness trainer
7. iSAEC and HMORN to use electronic medical records to research genetics of drug-induced SAEs
8. Electronic Health Records May Not Always Improve Care
9. Electronic nose detects cancer
10. Real-time physician electronic alerts reduce unnecessary blood testing in elderly patients
11. US hospitals making only modest gains in adoption of electronic health records
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... There are nearly 14.5 million ... million cancer survivors worldwide. On Sunday, June 5, 2016, communities around the world will ... Survivors Day®. , National Cancer Survivors Day® is an annual worldwide Celebration of ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... , ... May 26, 2016 , ... In an effort to provide hair restoration information ... both Snapchat users and those who do not use the app. Dr. Mohebi, the founder ... page, Dr. Mohebi Live . , Dr. Mohebi says, “The positive response to ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... North Cypress Medical ... at Blackhorse Golf Club in Cypress. With the help of community partners, the event ... empowers, and renews hope for wounded service members and their families through health, wellness, ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Power Systems, a leading developer ... Instructor Certification Course in Stoughton, Massachusetts. The course was led by Power Systems’ ... 8 hour interactive course to qualify participants as certified PowerWave trainers. , ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... The introduction of our professional athletes coincides with the company’s new campaign: “LOOK ... are proud to introduce Meghan Klingenberg, defender and World Champion with the US Women’s ... Los Angeles who was a second round selection in the 2012 NFL draft. We ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... -- Open Access Journal Focusing on ... Elsevier , a world-leading provider of scientific, technical ... launch of Clinical Neurophysiology Practice ... clinical practice issues in clinical neurophysiology. The journal will ... and didactic reviews. It is an official journal of ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... , May 23, 2016 ... Handling Equipment Market by Product (Wheelchair, Scooters, Medical ... (Bariatric Care, Critical Care, Wound), Accessories (Lifting, Transfer) ... to 2021", published by MarketsandMarkets, the patient handling ... Billion by 2021 at a CAGR of 10.5% ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ALBANY, New York , May 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... new market report titled, " Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency Market ... Forecast 2013 - 2023 ." According to the report, ... at a CAGR of 8.3% from 2015 to 2023 ... pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a condition characterized by the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: