Navigation Links
Einstein receives $3 million to study impact of soccer heading on the brain
Date:2/27/2013

February 27, 2013 (BRONX, NY) Sports-related concussion is an increasingly recognized public health problem. At least 1.6 million sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries occur in the United States annually. While the primary focus has been on football, soccer has come under greater scrutiny. "Heading" in soccer may be largely safe, but in light of wide concern for repetitive mild brain injury, further investigation is required to determine if and how much "heading" can be done with little or no harm to the player.

Now, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have received a $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to investigate the short and long-term consequences of soccer heading on the brain. (Heading refers to players fielding the soccer ball with their head.) The researchers, led by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., have previously shown that frequent heading in soccer is associated with mild brain injury and cognitive impairment.

Dr. Lipton, who is associate director of Einstein's Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center and medical director of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) services at Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital for Einstein, previously conducted a pilot study of amateur soccer players that found players who headed the ball more than 1,000 to 1,500 times a year were more likely to have mild traumatic brain injury and cognitive impairment than players who headed the ball less. His findings were presented at the 2011 Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting. The newly funded research project will build upon and extend those findings.

The researchers will recruit 400 active male and female adult soccer players and assess the relationship between heading over the previous year to structural and cognitive measures. An advanced MRI technology, known as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), along with cognitive tests will be used to measure brain function. The researchers will follow the participants over two years to record any changes in these measures.

"The goal of our study is to characterize the relationship of heading and brain injury and thereby lay a foundation for the development and implementation of new safe play guidelines," said Dr. Lipton, who is also associate professor of radiology, of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience at Einstein. "With growing concerns about sports-related repetitive mild brain injuries, we need rigorous studies that can help us make informed decisions about different approaches to protect players."


'/>"/>

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Einstein researchers present on imaging advances
2. Saul Schottenstein Foundation B Makes a Grant to Weinstein JCC
3. Feinstein Institute Scientist Wins Crafoord Award from Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for Arthritis Research
4. A Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Study Shows Early Cognitive Problems among Those Who Eventually Get Alzheimer's
5. Feinstein Institute researchers discover plant derivative
6. Feinstein announces submission of new drug application for diagnosing parkinsonian syndromes
7. Feinstein Institute researchers discover that bean used in Chinese food could protect against sepsis
8. Einstein-Montefiore scientists awarded 2 NCI Provocative Questions grants
9. Einstein receives nearly $5 million to study how Ebola causes infection
10. Feinstein Institute to Receive Grant from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to Improve Schizophrenia Treatment
11. Feinstein Institute to receive grant to improve schizophrenia treatment
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... serving communities in the greater Dallas, Miami, and Raleigh regions, is organizing an ... to overcome a rare and deadly chromosome abnormality. , After struggling since birth ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... The International Association of Eating ... excellence for the field of eating disorders, announces the opening of early registration ... Orlando, Florida at the Omni Resort at ChampionsGate. , The annual ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... with Alzheimer’s or dementia. However, many long-term care insurance companies have a waiver for ... mean is the 90-day elimination period, when the family pays for care, is often ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... giving viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of "Success Files," ... on current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with passion and ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... CitiDent and San Francisco ... using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 million Americans are estimated ... in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to about 75 percent of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/2/2017)... , Oct. 2, 2017  AllianceRx Walgreens Prime, ... formed by Walgreens and pharmacy benefit manager Prime Therapeutics ... new brand, which included the unveiling of new signage ... , as well as at a few other company-owned ... new brand to patients, some of whom will begin ...
(Date:9/28/2017)... 2017 Cohen Veterans Bioscience and Early Signal ... wearable and home sensors for real-time monitoring of patients ... a nonprofit organization focused on disruptive health solutions for ... analytical system to record and integrate behavioral, cognitive, physiological ... ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... PROVIDENCE, R.I. , Sept. 25, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... immunogenicity assessment, vaccine design, and immune-engineering today announced ... focused on the development of personalized therapeutic cancer ... and has provided exclusive access to enabling technologies ... MSc Eng., MBA will lead EpiVax Oncology as ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: