Navigation Links
Einstein receives $3 million to study impact of soccer heading on the brain

February 27, 2013 (BRONX, NY) Sports-related concussion is an increasingly recognized public health problem. At least 1.6 million sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries occur in the United States annually. While the primary focus has been on football, soccer has come under greater scrutiny. "Heading" in soccer may be largely safe, but in light of wide concern for repetitive mild brain injury, further investigation is required to determine if and how much "heading" can be done with little or no harm to the player.

Now, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have received a $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to investigate the short and long-term consequences of soccer heading on the brain. (Heading refers to players fielding the soccer ball with their head.) The researchers, led by Michael Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., have previously shown that frequent heading in soccer is associated with mild brain injury and cognitive impairment.

Dr. Lipton, who is associate director of Einstein's Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Center and medical director of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) services at Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital for Einstein, previously conducted a pilot study of amateur soccer players that found players who headed the ball more than 1,000 to 1,500 times a year were more likely to have mild traumatic brain injury and cognitive impairment than players who headed the ball less. His findings were presented at the 2011 Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting. The newly funded research project will build upon and extend those findings.

The researchers will recruit 400 active male and female adult soccer players and assess the relationship between heading over the previous year to structural and cognitive measures. An advanced MRI technology, known as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), along with cognitive tests will be used to measure brain function. The researchers will follow the participants over two years to record any changes in these measures.

"The goal of our study is to characterize the relationship of heading and brain injury and thereby lay a foundation for the development and implementation of new safe play guidelines," said Dr. Lipton, who is also associate professor of radiology, of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience at Einstein. "With growing concerns about sports-related repetitive mild brain injuries, we need rigorous studies that can help us make informed decisions about different approaches to protect players."


Contact: Kim Newman
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Related medicine news :

1. Einstein researchers present on imaging advances
2. Saul Schottenstein Foundation B Makes a Grant to Weinstein JCC
3. Feinstein Institute Scientist Wins Crafoord Award from Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for Arthritis Research
4. A Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Study Shows Early Cognitive Problems among Those Who Eventually Get Alzheimer's
5. Feinstein Institute researchers discover plant derivative
6. Feinstein announces submission of new drug application for diagnosing parkinsonian syndromes
7. Feinstein Institute researchers discover that bean used in Chinese food could protect against sepsis
8. Einstein-Montefiore scientists awarded 2 NCI Provocative Questions grants
9. Einstein receives nearly $5 million to study how Ebola causes infection
10. Feinstein Institute to Receive Grant from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to Improve Schizophrenia Treatment
11. Feinstein Institute to receive grant to improve schizophrenia treatment
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the toilets were," said an inventor from Hillside, N.J. "Many people catch diseases ... cover so that individuals will always be protected from germs." , He developed ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Consistent with the ... 2016 Building Better Radiology Marketing Programs meeting will showcase some of the ... 2016, at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas with a pre-conference session on a ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) awarded accreditation to its ... exclusive list of CAAHEP accredited colleges, as only one of twelve colleges and universities ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... Marne, MI (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 ... ... center for substance abuse located in central Michigan, have come together on Thanksgiving ... a specially produced video, available for viewing on the Serenity Point YouTube channel, ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... Jobs in hospital medical laboratories and ... offered by healthcare staffing agency Aureus Medical Group . These fields, ... 2015 among those searching for healthcare jobs through the company’s website, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... PUNE, India , November ... --> ... / personal emergency response system ... grow steadily for 5 years ... growing region expected to see ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... November 26, 2015 --> ... combination approach blends immunotherapy with Bremachlorin-photodynamic therapy for advanced ... approach blends immunotherapy with Bremachlorin-photodynamic therapy for advanced cancer. ... approach blends immunotherapy with Bremachlorin-photodynamic therapy for advanced cancer. ... has found that immunotherapy can be efficiently combined with ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... DUBLIN , Nov. 26, 2015 Research and ... "Asia Pacific Cardiac Pacemaker Market Outlook to 2019 - ... Drive the Demand " report to their offering. ... --> Boston scientific and others. ... global players including Medtronic, Biotronik, Boston ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: