Navigation Links
Egg Consumption Poses Risks for Diabetic Men: Study

Study of doctors shows 7 eggs a week raise risk of dying

THURSDAY, April 10 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that consuming more than six eggs a week seems to raise the risk of dying from all causes.

And diabetics seem to face an even higher mortality risk, according to the study that was limited to men.

"The more eggs diabetic men consumed, the more they increased their risk for death," said study lead author Dr. Luc Djousse, an associate epidemiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Djousse and his team analyzed egg consumption and mortality data among more than 21,000 men who had participated in a Physician's Health Study that explored heart disease and cancer prevention among American male doctors.

Participants ranged in age from 40 to 86. Over an average of 20 years, all the doctors completed annual written questionnaires on daily egg consumption, stroke and heart attack incidence, diabetes status, cholesterol levels, alcohol and smoking habits, and general dietary information.

On average, the physicians were found to have consumed one egg a week -- a rate the study authors termed "relatively low."

Overall, egg consumption wasn't found to be associated with heart attack or stroke risk. And consumption of up to six eggs a week also wasn't found to be associated with a higher risk of death from all causes. But eating seven or more eggs a week among healthy study participants was linked to a 23 percent higher risk of death.

Even more striking was the finding that mortality risk was much higher among those doctors with diabetes. Consuming seven or more eggs a week doubled their risk of death from all causes, compared with diabetic doctors who ate just one egg each week.

The findings were published in the April issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and elevated LDL ("bad") cholesterol is a prime risk factor for cardiovascular trouble. And while eggs are rich in cholesterol -- and circulating cholesterol is related to the risk of cardiovascular disease -- the relationship between dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol is complex. Some studies have suggested that dietary cholesterol doesn't affect blood cholesterol levels in many people, but it may in other individuals, such as those with diabetes, the researchers noted.

A single egg contains about 200 milligrams of cholesterol -- just 100 milligrams shy of the daily limit advocated for those at risk for heart disease, the researchers added.

On the other hand, eggs are a source of minerals, folate, B vitamins, protein and monounsaturated fats -- all of which have the potential to lower overall risk.

To explain the finding on diabetic men, the researchers theorized that diabetics might somehow convert dietary cholesterol more readily into blood cholesterol than people without diabetes.

"We need additional data to confirm these findings, so it's kind of premature to advise against egg consumption until we have more information," Djousse said.

Donald McNamara, executive director of the Washington, D.C.-based Egg Nutrition Center, said that while diabetics need to carefully assess all aspects of their diet, "no one food exists in isolation."

"And when we look at all the other studies that have been published, they show that easily an egg a day can fit into a healthy diet with no change in heart-disease risk for the average person and those with diabetes," McNamara added. "Eggs also provide some very important nutrients in terms of high quality protein and choline, which we know is insufficient in the diet today. So, you have to balance out the nutritional contribution of eggs in the diet relative to this kind of a study, which presents a very unique finding which has not been presented anywhere else, and has a lot of variables included that we don't know enough about."

In an accompanying editorial published in the journal, Dr. Robert H. Eckel, a professor of physiology and biophysics at the University of Colorado and co-chair of both the Cardiometabolic Health Congress and the Committee on Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, echoed some of McNamara's comments and called for more research to validate the study findings.

"Eggs are like all other foods -- they are neither 'good' nor 'bad', and they can be part of an overall heart-healthy diet," Eckel said. But he suggested that those wary of the high cholesterol content in whole eggs might want to skip yolks in favor of egg whites, which are ripe with protein, riboflavin and selenium.

And Lona Sandon, a registered dietician and assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, said that "the white part of the egg is the gold standard for protein."

"It contains all the essential immunoacids that your muscle needs for building," she said. "It's better than beef even. And it's one of the cheapest sources of protein as well. There are some good things in the yolk as well. But for someone who has had their cholesterol measured and found to have high LDL, the American Heart Association and the American Dietetic Association say watch your egg consumption, and try not to consume more than two yolks per week."

More information

For additional information on nutrition and diabetes, visit the American Diabetes Association.

SOURCES: Luc Djousse, M.D, associate epidemiologist, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and assistant professor, Harvard Medical School, Boston; Donald McNamara, executive director, Egg Nutrition Center, Washington, D.C.; Lona Sandon, R.D., assistant professor of clinical nutrition, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas; April 2008, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. High alcohol consumption increases stroke risk among Chinese men
2. High alcohol consumption increases stroke risk, Tulane study says
3. Frequent alcohol consumption increases cancer risk in older women
4. Produce for Better Health Foundation Releases Statement on Study Saying Fruit & Vegetable Consumption Not Strongly Associated With Colon Cancer Risk
5. Kaiser Permanente Study Shows Alcohol Consumption - No Matter Beverage Type - Linked to Breast Cancer Risk
6. Strawberry Consumption Associated with C-Reactive Protein Among Women: New Harvard Study
7. Grape Consumption Improves Antioxidant Capacity in Humans
8. Age, burden, divorce and heavy tea consumption are significant risk factors for erosive esophagitis
9. Scientists identify gene that influences alcohol consumption
10. High Meat Consumption Linked to Heightened Cancer Risk
11. No need for reduced alcohol consumption in later life
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... has focused on providing comprehensive solutions involving adult stem cell therapies to patients ... officially deemed the “Regenestem” name as a Registered Trademark (RTM). , Organizations are ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 25, 2015 , ... Bunion Bootie , the newest ... of the early holiday shopping season. Starting Wednesday November 25th, Bunion Booties are ... Friday promotional pricing is in addition to any automatic discounts applied when buying ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... Eric C. Seidel, ... many benefits of the revolutionary BIOLASE WaterLase iPlus 2.0™ system. This advanced laser ... used by a dentist in Gettysburg, PA . From routine visits to ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... , ... New patients who wish to seek treatment for missing teeth can ... her Mississauga, ON practice. Dr. Williams has been providing dental service for over 34 ... Missing teeth can lead to a variety of complications if they are not replaced ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... Charitable giving is at its peak during the holidays. In fact, ... the year totalling over $358 billion in 2014. With more than 1.5 million ... individuals who want to “give back” during the holidays. , “With so many charities ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015 Research and Markets ( ) ... - Global Forecast to 2020" report to their ... for 37.21% of the total market share in 2014. ... region is projected to growth at the highest CAGR ... primarily to the fast growing water, industrial gas treatment, ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 25, 2015 WuXi PharmaTech (Cayman) Inc. ("WuXi" ... open-access R&D capability and technology platform company serving the ... China and the ... extraordinary general meeting of shareholders held today, the Company,s ... and approve the previously announced agreement and plan of ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... N.C. , Nov. 24, 2015  In the ... projects in an effort to quickly uncover new insights, ... --> --> However, ... a market research project and ensure that all rules ... and industry standards. Another major barrier to efficiently launching ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: