Navigation Links
Education doesn't increase odds that minorities play 'high-status' sports

WASHINGTON, DC, May 25, 2011 Black and Mexican American doctors and lawyers aren't any more likely to play "high-status" sports such as golf or tennis than less educated people within their racial-ethnic groups, and more educated blacks may actually be less inclined to do so, suggests a new study in the June issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior

Relying on nationally representative data from the 1998 National Health Interview Survey-Sample Adult Prevention Module, and focusing on 17,455 adults ages 25 to 60, the study finds that racial-ethnic differences in the types of physical exercises people engage in don't narrow with increasing education. According to the study, whites disproportionately undertake facility-based exercise (e.g., golf and tennis), blacks tend toward team sports (e.g., basketball, football, and soccer) and fitness activities (e.g., running, weight lifting, and cycling), and Mexican Americans gravitate toward team-centered athletics.

"We assumed that people with higher levels of education were more likely to be in prestigious fields such as law or medicine, and if we think about the physical activities that lawyers and doctors participate in, they are often sports like golf or tennis," said study co-author Jarron M. Saint Onge, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Houston. "We expected that regardless of race-ethnicity, people at the upper levels of the educational spectrum would gravitate toward these so called high-status behaviors of the dominant group."

But, instead, Saint Onge and co-author Patrick M. Krueger, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Colorado-Denver, find this is not the case, and that for blacks the opposite actually holds true regarding their participation in "high-status" sports. With increasing education, blacks also move further away from whites when it comes to participation in team-based athletics and the gap between whites and Mexican Americans grows as it pertains to fitness activities.

"We find no evidence of narrowing racial-ethnic differences in exercise with increasing education," Saint Onge said. "Rather, what we find is that with increasing levels of education, we continue to see this racial-ethnic division and, in fact, it grows."

Saint Onge said there are several possible reasons why racial-ethnic differences in exercise persist and, in some cases, expand with more education. "One possibility is that high-status minorities may seek to differentiate themselves from whites in an effort to maintain their racial and ethnic solidarity and to increase their political power," Saint Onge said. "Exercise and sports provide social contexts that allow groups to create social identities and resistor sometimes reinforcecultural stereotypes."

Other possible reasons include the fact that blacks and Mexican Americans often attend lower quality schools than whites, where they may acquire less human capital per school year and have limited access to cultural resources that encourage high-status behaviors. And, even highly educated blacks and Mexican Americans may live in segregated neighborhoods where exercise preferences are shaped by cultural norms and the availability of recreational opportunities.

While the study finds that whites, blacks, and Mexican Americans are not more likely to engage in the same types of physical activities as their education levels increase, the likelihood that they participate in some type of exercise does rise with education.

"More educated people generally have more motivation to exercise," Saint Onge said. "They know the benefits of exercising, they spend time with people who are more likely to be exercising, and they have the time and resources to exercise."

In terms of policy implications, Saint Onge said the study could aid the design of effective public health interventions to promote physical activity. "Public health interventions might be more effective if they take into account the fact that more education leads to more physical activity and also recognize that members of different education and racial-ethnic groups gravitate toward certain types of exercise, either because of their limited access to recreational facilities or because of different exercise preferences," Saint Onge said.


Contact: Daniel Fowler
American Sociological Association

Related medicine news :

1. NACDD Receives Two-Year Grant From Merck & Co., Inc. to Improve Diabetes Education
2. In Support of the Lets Move Campaign to Fight Childhood Obesity, Verizon Thinkfinity Providing Free Educational Resources on Nutrition and Exercise
3. DavisPTnetwork Partners with the New York Physical Therapy Association to Provide Online Continuing Education
4. Online Dating Reinvents Itself with the Recent Roll-Out of, a Free Website that Focuses on a Person's Career in Education!
5. What to Look for When Selecting an Electronic Health Record for Your Community Oncology Practice - Free Educational Webinar
6. San Diego State University and BIOCOM Institute Receive $4.95 Million Grant: The BRIDGE Project, Linking Education to Employment in San Diegos Life Sciences Industry
7. Smithsonian Institution, Arizona State University announce education and research partnership
8. “Hearts and Minds” Education Program Launched: On Average, People with Mental illness Live 25 Years Less than Other Americans
9. DavisPTnetwork Partners with the Florida Physical Therapy Association to Provide Online Continuing Education
10. ChildCare Education Institute Supports the First Ladys Efforts to Reduce Childhood Obesity
11. Kaplan Continuing Education Expands Health Care Certificate Programs
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the toilets were," said an inventor from Hillside, N.J. "Many people catch diseases ... cover so that individuals will always be protected from germs." , He developed ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... MPWH, the No.1 Herpes-only dating community in the world, revealed that over ... More than 3.7 billion people under the age of 50 – or 67% of ... WHO's first global estimates of HSV-1 infection . , "The data shocks us highly!" ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The ... prided itself for not only fulfilling the needs of advisers and clients but ... affordable price and providing top-tier customer service. However, there's always room for improvement, ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... CA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... California Medical Associates, Inc. and Dr. Tucker Bierbaum with Emergency Medicine at ... They observed that both STEMI and Sepsis conditions present in similar ways and require ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... NV (PRWEB) , ... November 26, 2015 , ... Inevitably ... strategy. Many customers choose to buy during the Black Friday and Cyber Monday ... Shoppers don’t need to search the Internet high and low to find the best ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/29/2015)... Nov. 29, 2015   Royal Philips  (NYSE: PHG, ... solutions at the 2015 Radiological Society of North America ... McCormick Place in Chicago . Visitors ... the company,s broad portfolio of integrated Diagnostic Imaging, Clinical ... increase clinical performance, improve workflow and create a superior ...
(Date:11/29/2015)...  The GE Health Cloud 1 was unveiled today ... North America (RSNA) meeting in ... new cloud ecosystem and its applications will connect radiologists and ... multidisciplinary teams – both inside and outside the hospital setting. ... GE. "As the digital industrial leader, we are betting big ...
(Date:11/29/2015)... , Nov. 29, 2015   National Decision ... of its client base, including notable statewide implementations. ... company,s flagship solution, ACR Select, more than 1 ... order entry workflow. ACR Select provides real-time feedback ... patient,s condition and has been implemented at over ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: