Navigation Links
Eating Meat May Raise Breast Cancer Risk in Whites: Study
Date:11/2/2012

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Investigators have found preliminary evidence that eating red meat and poultry seems to boost the risk of breast cancer in white women -- but not black women.

"Most breast cancer studies have been conducted in [white] women," senior study author Dr. Elisa Bandera, an epidemiologist at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, said in an institute news release.

So while previous research into the association between meat consumption and breast cancer has only looked at white women, Bandera noted, "our study provides new information on the role consumption of animal foods play on breast cancer development in women of European and African ancestry."

In their study, the researchers took a wider look with the help of questionnaires that were answered by 976 black women and 873 white women with breast cancer, and 1,165 black women and 865 white women without cancer.

Among white women, those who ate the most unprocessed red meat and poultry seemed to have a higher breast cancer risk than those who ate the least, especially among those who hadn't reached menopause, the investigators found. Each increase in weekly consumption of about 18 ounces or more of red meat and 7 ounces or more of poultry appeared to raise the risk in white women.

No association was found among black women other than a suggestion that red meat consumption might reduce the risk of one kind of tumor.

"This research supports encouraging [white] women to limit their intake of both red meat and poultry in order to reduce their risk of breast cancer, which is in line with the American Institute for Cancer Research's recommendation of limiting red meat intake to less than 500 grams per week," study lead author and research teaching specialist Urmila Chandran, said in the news release.

"Being that this study may be one of the first to examine this association in [black] women, results from this group are not conclusive, and more investigation is needed to replicate these findings," Chandran added.

Although the study found an association between meat consumption and breast cancer risk in certain women, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

The findings were scheduled for presentation Thursday at the American Institute for Cancer Research meeting in Washington, D.C. The data and conclusions of research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

For more about breast cancer, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCE: Cancer Institute of New Jersey, news release, Nov. 1, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Eating More Fruits, Veggies May Help Kidney Patients
2. Stem cells show promise for treating infertility in cancer patients
3. Eating More Meals Linked to Less Student Overweight
4. Scientists to study the role genes play in treating TB
5. Treating Sperm With Missing Protein Might Help Male Fertility
6. Treating disease by the numbers
7. Cant Stop Eating M&Ms?
8. Researchers call for early diagnosis of flesh-eating infections
9. Single gene cause of insulin sensitivity may offer insight for treating diabetes
10. Stress prompts some to retain as much salt as eating fries
11. 4 Eating Habits May Help Older Women Maintain Weight Loss
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Eating Meat May Raise Breast Cancer Risk in Whites: Study
(Date:3/30/2017)... ... March 30, 2017 , ... According to the American ... each year, putting it among the top 5 most popular minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures in ... million-plus procedures will be performed over the next 8-10 weeks. For anyone considering a ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... NC (PRWEB) , ... March 30, 2017 , ... ... will host the live audio conference “ Preventing Hospital Readmissions Through Discharge Planning ... 12, 2017 at 1:00 pm ET. This conference discusses strategies to prevent readmissions ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... squash, announced it has enlisted New York City-based sports and entertainment marketing firm ... and procure sponsorship opportunities for the Professional Squash Association (PSA), which includes first-time ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... St. Petersburg, FL (PRWEB) , ... March 30, 2017 , ... ... Often called the "Spice of Life" or "Wonder Spice", it has been used for ... extensive use in the East," says Heshelow, author of " Turmeric: How to Use ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... IN (PRWEB) , ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... Study, this webinar provides insight into the challenges employers face in trying to ... complexity of managing employee benefits programs? Adding to the growing complexity, companies ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/30/2017)... March 30, 2017  Lannett Company, Inc. (NYSE: ... made a $25 million payment against its existing revolving ... combined with the $75 million payment we made earlier ... million in annualized cash interest expense, at current rates" ... Lannett.  "Our business is solid and we continue to ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , Mar. 29, 2017 Research ... Neuromonitoring (IONM) Market Size & Forecast By Type (Insource IONM, ... 2025" report to their offering. ... The global Intraoperative Neuromonitoring ... 2025. The intraoperative neuromonitoring market is anticipated to witness significant ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017 Global intravenous (IV) iron ... billion by 2021, growing at a CAGR of 5%. ... by a doctor to treat anemia or other iron deficiencies. ... in the body. However, in some cases, oral administrations are ... and intravenous (IV) iron therapy comes into the picture. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: