Navigation Links
Earlier PSA Test Best Predicts Risk of Dying From Prostate Cancer: Study
Date:5/18/2011

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- The results of a first prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test for males between the ages of 44 and 50 can predict the risk of dying of prostate cancer within the next 25 to 30 years, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed blood samples collected from 12,090 Swedish men between 1974 and 1986 when they were ages 44 to 50, samples from nearly 5,000 of the men six years later when they were ages 51 to 55, and samples from 1,167 men who were 60.

Men who had PSA levels below the median when they were 44 to 50 had a very low risk of prostate cancer death or metastases within 15 years. By age 60, for those men with PSA levels below the median, the risk of prostate cancer had decreased significantly to 0.5 percent.

Although current American Cancer Society guidelines suggest all but high-risk men should discuss screening with their doctor at age 50, the study authors say their results indicate earlier testing could reduce unnecessary screening later on.

The findings suggest that more than half of men could forego regular PSA testing after that time and have just three PSA tests in their lifetime, with the first one between the ages of 44 and 50, the second between ages 51 and 55, and -- if their PSA levels are still low -- the third and last at age 60, said the researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

However, men with higher PSA levels between the ages of 44 and 50 are at high risk for aggressive prostate cancer and should continue to undergo PSA tests and screening as necessary, the researchers added.

The study was slated to be presented to journalists today May 18 as part of the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

"This research helps us distinguish between those men who may benefit from regular PSA screening for prostate cancer and those men who may not need to be screened so frequently," lead author Dr. Hans Lilja, a clinical chemist with joint appointments in the Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Surgery, and Medicine, said in a Memorial Sloan-Kettering news release.

"Instead of testing all men each year or every two years, screening and surveillance efforts can be focused on early detection of prostate cancer in those men who are found to be at high risk of death from the disease."

PSA testing is recommended for early detection of prostate cancer but is associated with a high rate of overdiagnosis and overtreatment, which is a concern because prostate cancer treatment can lead to debilitating erectile and urinary problems.

Because the study is being presented at a medical meeting, its results should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about prostate cancer.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, news release, May 18, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Nuclear physics promises earlier detection of brain tumors with just 1 scan
2. Earlier Detection of Breast Cancer May Be Possible
3. Women Who Marry Younger Men May Die Earlier
4. Cost of caring for stroke patients double that of earlier estimates
5. Teen automobile crash rates are higher when school starts earlier
6. Gene-Based Detection Method Might Spot HIV Earlier
7. Sleep Disorder May Help Predict Parkinsons Decades Earlier
8. New way of classifying rheumatoid arthritis aimed at identifying the disease earlier
9. Absent Father Might Mean Earlier Puberty for Higher-Income Girls
10. Experimental Test May Spot Prostate Cancer Earlier, More Accurately
11. Urine Markers May Reveal Kidney Damage Earlier
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Earlier PSA Test  Best Predicts Risk of Dying From Prostate Cancer: Study
(Date:2/26/2017)... ... February 26, 2017 , ... ODH, Inc.™ announced today it will exhibit ... Sheraton Pentagon City Hotel in Arlington, VA. ODH’s director of medical strategy, Candace Saldarini, ... to improve Medicaid population health management. , ODH will also have an exhibit booth ...
(Date:2/25/2017)... ... February 25, 2017 , ... FCPX users now have the ability to ... Studios. With ProSharpen Color users have total control over sharpening amount, sharpening radius, threshold, ... With color spectrum tools users can visually see the color range effected with ease ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... Only two months after the official release of The Private Collection – Edition 2017 ... initiated a second print-run of its lavish luxury travel coffee table book. , ... in at more than six kilos, retails at EUR 1,000 per copy and is ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... , ... Dr. Ronald E. Hawkins, vice president for academic ... A. Bell, DO, MBA, HPF, FACOEP-dist., FACEP, as the new dean of ... comes to Liberty from the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine (OU-HCOM), ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 , ... ... and hearing disabilities, it is so critically important that we all are aware ... That is why Mediaplanet is proud to announce the launch of its newest ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... ITL Limited, ( ASX : ITD ), une société de ... excellents résultats semestriels clos le 31 décembre 2016 par ... « Résultats et mise à jour sur la croissance biomédicale ... Faits marquants Bénéfice ... hausse de 104 %) Bénéfice par action ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... 23, 2017 Non-alcoholic steatohepataitis (NASH) ... various drugs being developed for the treatment ... drugs that are in various phases of ... focuses on novel pharmacologic drugs & regenerative ... therapies, recombinant proteins and RNA-based therapeutics, but ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... Feb. 24, 2017  Xynomic Pharmaceuticals, Inc., an oncology ... it has acquired exclusive worldwide rights to develop, ... HDAC inhibitor targeting hematological and solid tumors. ... 1 and 2 clinical trials of Abexinostat in ... have already been completed, demonstrating that Abexinostat is ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: