Navigation Links
ECG Reading May Predict Death, Rehospitalization Risk

Measurement is inexpensive, simple to perform, yields instant result, study says

TUESDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized heart failure patients who have a longer than normal QRS duration (a measurement of the electrical conducting time of the heart on an electrocardiogram) appear to have a high risk of death or rehospitalization, U.S. researchers report.

They analyzed data from 2,962 patients hospitalized for heart failure who had a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF -- a measure of how well the left ventricle of the heart pumps with each contraction) of 40 percent or less. Of those patients, 1,641 had a normal QRS duration (less than 120 ms) and 1,321 had a prolonged QRS duration (120 ms or greater).

During follow-up of 9.9 months, 678 of the patients died, including 1,641 patients (18.7 percent) with normal QRS duration and 371 patients (28.1 percent) with prolonged QRS duration. Rates of cardiovascular death or rehospitalization for heart failure were 32.4 percent for patients with normal QRS and 41.6 percent for those with prolonged QRS duration.

After they adjusted for a number of variables, the researchers concluded that patients with prolonged QRS duration were 24 percent more likely to die and 28 percent more likely to suffer cardiovascular-related death or rehospitalization for heart failure than those with normal QRS duration.

The study appears in the June 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"In this analysis, a prolonged QRS duration was present in 45 percent of patients admitted with heart failure, and reduced LVEF, did not appear to significantly change during hospitalization, and was independently associated with high post-discharge mortality and readmission rate. This high morbidity and mortality was observed even though patients were well-treated with standard medical therapy that included beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers [ARBs]," wrote the researchers from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

"Measurement of the QRS duration on an ECG has significant advantages as a tool in the clinical setting. It is relatively inexpensive, simple to perform, and yields an instant result. The measurement is objective and does not require specialized training to interpret. In addition, the QRS duration is stable in the majority of patients during the course of their hospitalization. Perhaps most important, a prolonged QRS duration becomes a potential target for intervention [with existing therapy], which may improve post-discharge mortality and morbidity," the researchers wrote.

More information

The American Heart Association has more about heart failure.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, June 10, 2008

Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. HCV and HBV spreading more slowly among injection drug users in San Francisco
2. ClassMate Reader - Portable reading system supports K-12 students with reading difficulties
3. Sound training rewires dyslexic childrens brains for reading
4. Diagnostic Mammogram Readings Vary by Radiologist
5. VA Salutes Volunteers Spreading Holiday Cheer
6. Optimal Readings Appoints Operations Veteran Rita Edwards as SVP Clinical Operations
7. Optimal Readings Selected to Present at CEDs 25th Annual Venture Conference
8. New CDC Study Shows Smoke-Free Laws Spreading Across U.S. and Should Spur Remaining States to Take Action
9. Who Knew You Could Learn to Lose Weight by Reading an Enjoyable Novel?
10. Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
11. Waist-to-hip ratio may better predict cardiovascular risk than body mass index
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Lori R. Somekh, founder ... of ElderCounsel, a national organization of elder law and special needs planning attorneys. “Membership ... rules. It also provides a forum to network with elder law attorneys nationwide,” said ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... York, NY (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... influential people in business to advocate for action towards gender equality at their inaugural ... views from around the globe, and reached a social audience of over 3 million. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Coveros, a leader in agile ... a contract by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The Enterprise ... use of Agile methodologies in a consistent and high value manner across CMS ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... CitiDent and ... apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 million Americans ... frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to about 75 ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... The American College of Medical ... Friedman, PhD, FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. ... honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, this ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/28/2017)... , Sept. 28, 2017 Cohen Veterans ... advance the use of wearable and home sensors for ... disorders. Early Signal Foundation, a nonprofit organization focused on ... will provide an affordable analytical system to record and ... ...
(Date:9/27/2017)... Israel and NEW YORK , Sept. 27, ... with mobile health and big data solutions, today announced that its MyDario ... Please check your local TV listings for when The Dr. Oz Show ... ... season this month. ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... 2017  EpiVax, Inc., a leader in the ... today announced the launch of EpiVax Oncology Inc., ... therapeutic cancer vaccines. EpiVax has provided $500,000 in ... enabling technologies to the new precision immunotherapy venture. ... Oncology as Chief Executive Officer. Gad brings over ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: