Navigation Links
E-Records Linked to Fewer Malpractice Claims
Date:6/25/2012

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Malpractice claims dipped dramatically among Massachusetts physicians after they began using electronic medical records, according to new research, although it's not clear whether the record-keeping was connected to the decline in claims.

Despite its limitations, however, the research provides more evidence that electronic health records "improve quality and safety and, as a result, prevent adverse events and reduce the risk of malpractice claims," said study co-author Dr. Steven Simon, an associate professor with Harvard Medical School and an internist with VA Boston Healthcare System.

Electronic medical records allow physicians to use computers to track patients instead of relying on paper files. Supporters of electronic records say they cut down on errors by making it easier for doctors to spot problems such as medication conflicts and allergies. They can also make it easier for doctors to communicate with patients and with other physicians.

The medical world hasn't quickly embraced electronic records, in part because of the cost of switching from paper. Email communications, in particular, appear rare: In 2010, a HealthDay/Harris Interactive poll found that fewer than 1 in 10 adults used email to communicate with their physician.

And some physicians are skeptical of electronic health records, saying they could lead to "unintended consequences" that create new kinds of errors and problems for patients, Simon said.

In the new study, researchers tracked malpractice cases for 275 physicians who were surveyed in 2005 and 2007. Of those, 33 were targeted by malpractice claims. Forty-nine claims related to alleged medical malpractice that took place before the physicians adopted electronic health records, and two occurred after.

The researchers estimate that medical malpractice claims were about 84 percent less likely after electronic medical records were put into place.

The study says factors other than electronic health records could account for the difference in claims. Physicians who used the records, for example, could be "early adopters" whose style of medicine was less likely to spawn malpractice claims. Also, Massachusetts made major changes to the state's health care system in 2006.

And, the researchers pointed out in their letter published in the June 25 online edition of Archives of Internal Medicine, the study was limited to only those doctors in Massachusetts who were affiliated with Harvard Medical School.

Nevertheless, Tom Baker, a professor of law and health sciences at University of Pennsylvania Law School, said the study makes sense and "alleviates concerns that the use of electronic health records could lead to increased medical malpractice risk."

Some observers have feared that the ease of reviewing electronic health records would make it easier to find errors, he added.

"This research suggests that, rather than increasing medical malpractice risk, adopting electronic health records reduces that risk," he said.

More information

For more on health records, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Steven R. Simon, M.D., MPH, associate professor, department of medicine, Harvard Medical School, internist, VA Boston Healthcare System; Tom Baker, J.D., professor of law and health sciences, University of Pennsylvania Law School, Philadelphia; June 25, 2012, online, Archives of Internal Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Antibiotics Linked to Retinal Detachment Risk
2. Pesticides May Be Linked to Slightly Smaller Babies, Shorter Pregnancies
3. Pharmacy Robots Linked to Bacterial Contamination of Drugs
4. 2 genetic deletions in human genome linked to the development of aggressive prostate cancer
5. Dental X-Rays May Be Linked to Benign Brain Tumors
6. In Mice, Drug Reverses Symptoms of Condition Linked to Autism
7. Huntingtons Disease Linked to Reduced Cancer Risk in Study
8. Study finds significant skull differences between closely linked groups
9. Researchers Map Brain Regions Linked to Intelligence
10. Swallowing exercises linked with short-term improvement among patients with head and neck cancer
11. Anxiety Linked to Smarts in Brain Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
E-Records Linked to Fewer Malpractice Claims
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... , ... Nike Rugby Camp's success is due in large part to Ethan ... Rugby Camps and current Nike Camp director, has offered an all abilities rugby camp ... excited for our eighth summer here in San Diego,” says Willis. "We take great ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... , ... Hight-Doland Insurance Agency’s new community involvement program which serves families of ... of Southwest Louisiana to help provide positive mentoring for local youth. Donations to this ... of Southwest Louisiana has been helping to guide the area’s youth for over 30 ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... ... May kicked off with Melanoma Monday , a multi-agency effort to raise ... encouraging her patients, as well as residents all around Dallas, Cleburne, Irving, and Plano, ... in the future. , The dermatology-specific awareness month ends with “Don’t Fry Day,” established ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... Diego, California (PRWEB) , ... May 04, 2016 ... ... wearable technology that is transforming breastfeeding for nursing mothers. The company’s patented technology, ... intake while breastfeeding. Today, the company announced that the technology is now available ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... May 04, 2016 , ... Francesca Loparco, Co-Founder of Queen City Dream Cars, ... same-day LASIK procedure at Christenbury Eye Center. The entrepreneur struggled with her ... surgery the same day as her in-office consultation and eye exam. Francesca’s eyesight was ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... May 3, 2016 BioNovus Innovations LLC ... for Advancing Medical Innovation (IAMI) today announced a ... diagnostics and medical devices. An agreement ... rights to license, develop and commercialize medical innovations ... "This partnership represents a significant advance in ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ACME Markets, Delaware ... Delaware County Councilman Dave White announced ... ACME pharmacies across Delaware County ... Prevention (CDC), naloxone has saved 26,463 lives nationwide over the past ... Delaware County were authorized to administer naloxone to overdose ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... FLINT, Mich. , May 3, 2016   Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO) announced today ... The company released a video of two patients who tell their personal story and encourage ... hepatitis.   Meet Jacque: Hepatitis C ... ... Diplomat Specialty Pharmacy (PRNewsFoto/Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc.) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: