Navigation Links
Drug-Coated Sponges May Limit Catheter Infections
Date:3/24/2009

More than 10% of ICU patients are thought to develop these infections,,,,

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adding a sponge soaked in an antibacterial agent to the dressing around the spot where a catheter is inserted appears to reduce the chances that a potentially deadly infection will develop, French researchers report.

People in intensive care units (ICUs) usually require insertion of a central venous catheter. In the United States, about 80,000 catheter-related infections occur each year among ICU patients, including those caused by MRSA bacteria (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). The death rate from these infections can be as high as 11.5 percent, the researchers reported in the study.

"This is an important study," said Dr. Marc Siegel, an associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York City, who was not involved in the research. "The specific use of disinfectant in this way is important in preventing life-threatening infections" and has the potential to dramatically reduce the number of catheter-related infections, he said.

The report is published in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

For the study, the research team randomly assigned more than 1,600 ICU patients to have their catheters inserted with sponges soaked in chlorhexidine gluconate, an antibacterial commonly used in mouthwash, or to have standard dressings used on the insertion site. Dressings were changed every three to seven days.

They found that the rate of infections dropped from 1.1 percent among people who'd had standard dressings to 0.5 percent among those with an antibacterial-soaked dressing -- a 61 percent reduction. The researchers estimated that the chlorhexidine gluconate dressings prevented one major infection for every 117 catheters left in place for about 10 days.

Besides reducing infections, use of bacterial-soaked sponges also appeared to require less frequent changing of dressings, the researchers noted.

Bacteria was found on 7.8 percent of the catheters removed after three days, the study found, and on 8.6 percent of the catheters removed after seven days, for a difference of 0.8 percent.

They described this as a modest reduction that "appears safe."

However, one expert remained dubious as to the advisability of leaving dressings on for longer than the standard three days.

"What is extremely important here is that, while the infection rate did not increase with these less-frequent dressing changes, this finding applied only to unsoiled dressings," said Dr. Pascal James Imperato, dean of the graduate program in public health at the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, New York City.

Because leakage and soiling are very common at catheter insertion sites, it wasn't surprising that the study found that the absolute decrease in dressing changes was modest, Imperato said.

"In other words, in most patients, the dressings need to be changed every three days -- if not more often -- because of leakage and soiling," he said. "Thus the findings of this study have limited practical application."

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have more on protecting patients from infection.



SOURCES: Pascal James Imperato, M.D., M.P.H., dean, distinguished service professor, Graduate Program in Public Health, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, New York City; Marc Siegel, M.D., associate professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; March 25, 2009, Journal of the American Medical Association


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. UT Southwestern researchers find drug-coated stents less risky for heart bypass patients
2. Drug-Coated Stents Reduce Repeat Artery Procedures
3. More patients with drug-coated cardiac stents survive, avoid costly follow-up procedures
4. Drug-Coated Stents Still Spark Debate
5. New Drug-Coated Stent Does Well in Early Trial
6. Drug-coated balloon overcomes in-stent restenosis
7. Drug-Coated Balloons Keep Leg Arteries Open: Study
8. Drug-Coated Stents Better Than Bare-Metal Ones in Complex Cases
9. Drug-Coated Stents No Riskier in Long Run Than Bare Metal Ones
10. Study Finds Benefits With Drug-Coated Stents
11. Drug-Coated Stents Go Head to Head
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Drug-Coated Sponges May Limit Catheter Infections
(Date:6/28/2017)... ... June 28, 2017 , ... Continually at the forefront of ... Drops™ have received the Non-GMO Project Verified seal. All five flavors of the ... only third-party verification for non-GMO foods and products in North America. , Available ...
(Date:6/28/2017)... ... , ... Guide to FDA and EU Medical Device Regulations: 2017 Edition, **An ... the Atlantic devicemakers do business, this fully updated and expanded guide keeps them in ... the full text of the FDA’s regulations in 21 CFR Parts 800 to 898, ...
(Date:6/28/2017)... ... ... control has seen the never-ending twists on the house flipping show genre. The shows promote ... But what about the buyers of the flipper's flip. , Here is an ... An email recently sent to Gary Case said, “Just closed on a home on Capitol ...
(Date:6/28/2017)... ... ... David B. Sosin, a founding partner at the law firm Sosin, Arnold & ... for the Illinois State Bar Association , in accordance with the organization’s rules of ... following a state-wide election and served in that capacity for the past year prior to ...
(Date:6/28/2017)... , ... June 28, 2017 , ... American Farmer proudly ... episode of the award winning television series, scheduled to broadcast fourth quarter 2017. American ... originated as a regional supplier of garden pea seed. As demand grew, the small ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/3/2017)... -- Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY ... 3 MONARCH 2 study showed that abemaciclib, a ... with fulvestrant, significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) compared ... hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative ... progressed after endocrine therapy (median PFS, 16.4 vs. ...
(Date:5/30/2017)... 2017 Therapix Biosciences Ltd. (Nasdaq: TRPX), ... the development of cannabinoid-based drugs, today announced that ... at three upcoming scientific and investor conferences in ... Invitational: ...                     Wednesday, June ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... 2017  Leaf Healthcare, recognized for developing one ... pressure ulcer prevention, will unveil its comprehensive mobility ... Care Nurses, National Teaching Institute and Critical Care ... Leaf Patient Monitoring System is the first mobility ... The system seamlessly tracks patient movement throughout the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: