Navigation Links
Drug-Coated Sponges May Limit Catheter Infections

More than 10% of ICU patients are thought to develop these infections,,,,

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adding a sponge soaked in an antibacterial agent to the dressing around the spot where a catheter is inserted appears to reduce the chances that a potentially deadly infection will develop, French researchers report.

People in intensive care units (ICUs) usually require insertion of a central venous catheter. In the United States, about 80,000 catheter-related infections occur each year among ICU patients, including those caused by MRSA bacteria (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). The death rate from these infections can be as high as 11.5 percent, the researchers reported in the study.

"This is an important study," said Dr. Marc Siegel, an associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York City, who was not involved in the research. "The specific use of disinfectant in this way is important in preventing life-threatening infections" and has the potential to dramatically reduce the number of catheter-related infections, he said.

The report is published in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

For the study, the research team randomly assigned more than 1,600 ICU patients to have their catheters inserted with sponges soaked in chlorhexidine gluconate, an antibacterial commonly used in mouthwash, or to have standard dressings used on the insertion site. Dressings were changed every three to seven days.

They found that the rate of infections dropped from 1.1 percent among people who'd had standard dressings to 0.5 percent among those with an antibacterial-soaked dressing -- a 61 percent reduction. The researchers estimated that the chlorhexidine gluconate dressings prevented one major infection for every 117 catheters left in place for about 10 days.

Besides reducing infections, use of bacterial-soaked sponges also appeared to require less frequent changing of dressings, the researchers noted.

Bacteria was found on 7.8 percent of the catheters removed after three days, the study found, and on 8.6 percent of the catheters removed after seven days, for a difference of 0.8 percent.

They described this as a modest reduction that "appears safe."

However, one expert remained dubious as to the advisability of leaving dressings on for longer than the standard three days.

"What is extremely important here is that, while the infection rate did not increase with these less-frequent dressing changes, this finding applied only to unsoiled dressings," said Dr. Pascal James Imperato, dean of the graduate program in public health at the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, New York City.

Because leakage and soiling are very common at catheter insertion sites, it wasn't surprising that the study found that the absolute decrease in dressing changes was modest, Imperato said.

"In other words, in most patients, the dressings need to be changed every three days -- if not more often -- because of leakage and soiling," he said. "Thus the findings of this study have limited practical application."

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have more on protecting patients from infection.

SOURCES: Pascal James Imperato, M.D., M.P.H., dean, distinguished service professor, Graduate Program in Public Health, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, New York City; Marc Siegel, M.D., associate professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; March 25, 2009, Journal of the American Medical Association

Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. UT Southwestern researchers find drug-coated stents less risky for heart bypass patients
2. Drug-Coated Stents Reduce Repeat Artery Procedures
3. More patients with drug-coated cardiac stents survive, avoid costly follow-up procedures
4. Drug-Coated Stents Still Spark Debate
5. New Drug-Coated Stent Does Well in Early Trial
6. Drug-coated balloon overcomes in-stent restenosis
7. Drug-Coated Balloons Keep Leg Arteries Open: Study
8. Drug-Coated Stents Better Than Bare-Metal Ones in Complex Cases
9. Drug-Coated Stents No Riskier in Long Run Than Bare Metal Ones
10. Study Finds Benefits With Drug-Coated Stents
11. Drug-Coated Stents Go Head to Head
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Drug-Coated Sponges May Limit Catheter Infections
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Coveros, ... Development, has been awarded a contract by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid ... to accelerate the enterprise use of Agile methodologies in a consistent and high ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... “America On ... Christian identity. “America On The Brink” is the creation of published author, William ... several great-grandchildren. As a WWII veteran, he spent thirty years in the Navy. ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) , ... October 12, ... ... and Dr. Cheng, are now treating sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus ... sleep apnea, a serious sleep disorder characterized by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... to meet the demand of today’s consumer and regulatory authorities worldwide. From Children’s ... experts and tested to meet the highest standard. , These products are ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... ... The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) will present the 2017 Morris ... of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s Annual Symposium is taking ... in the field of medical informatics, this prestigious award is presented to an individual ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... Pa. , Oct. 12, 2017 ... leader in innovative solutions for injectable drug administration, today ... before the market opens on Thursday, October 26, 2017, ... the results and business expectations at 9:00 a.m. Eastern ... (U.S.) or 253-336-8738 (International). The conference ID is 94093362. ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... 2017  Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. ("Hill-Rom") (NYSE: HRC), today ... Las Piedras, Puerto Rico , where ... Following a comprehensive ... minor structural damage, temporary loss of power and minimal ... completed, manufacturing operations have resumed, and the company expects ...
(Date:10/5/2017)... 2017  In response to the nationwide opioid ... Surgeons (AAOMS) released prescribing recommendations that urge ibuprofen ... as a first-line therapy to manage a patient,s ... Recognizing the value and importance of ... Prescribing: Acute and Postoperative Pain Management" stresses that ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: