Navigation Links
Drinking milk to ease milk allergy?
Date:10/30/2008

Giving children with milk allergies increasingly higher doses of milk over time may ease, and even help them completely overcome, their allergic reactions, according to the results of a study led by the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and conducted jointly with Duke University.

Despite the small number of patients in the trial 19 the findings are illuminating and encouraging, investigators say, because this is the first-ever double-blinded and placebo-controlled study of milk immunotherapy. In the study, the researchers compared a group of children receiving milk powder to a group of children receiving placebo identical in appearance and taste to real milk powder. Neither the patients nor the investigators knew which child received which powder, a rigorous research setup that minimizes the chance for error and bias.

The findings of the study are reported online ahead of print, Oct. 28, in the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology

"Our findings suggest that oral immunotherapy gradually retrains the immune system to completely disregard or to better tolerate the allergens in milk that previously caused allergic reactions," says Robert Wood, M.D., senior investigator on the study and director of Allergy & Immunology at Hopkins Children's. "Albeit preliminary and requiring further study, these results suggest that oral immunotherapy may be the closest thing yet to a 'true' treatment for food allergy."

Currently, food allergy management involves complete avoidance of the trigger foods, waiting for the child to outgrow the allergy or treating allergic reactions if and when they occur. The latter could be dangerous, investigators say, because these common foods are difficult to avoid and some reactions can be severe and even life-threatening.

In a report released Oct. 22, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that food allergies are on the rise with three million children in the United States now having at least one food allergy, an 18 percent jump from 10 years ago. Milk allergy is the most prevalent type of food allergy.

"Given that the quality of life of a child with a food allergy is comparable to the quality of life of a child with diabetes, we urgently need therapies that go beyond strict food avoidance or waiting for the child to outgrow the allergy," Wood says.

Researchers followed allergic reactions over four months among 19 children with severe and persistent milk allergy, 6 to 17 years of age. Of the 19 patients, 12 received progressively higher doses of milk protein, and seven received placebo. At the beginning of the study, the children were able to tolerate on average only 40 mg (.04 ounces or a quarter of a teaspoon) of milk.

At the end of the four-month study, both groups were given milk powder as a "challenge" to see what dose would cause reaction after the treatment. The children who had been receiving increasingly higher doses of milk protein over a few months were able to tolerate a median dose of 5, 140 mg (over 5 ounces) of milk without having any allergic reaction or with mild symptoms, such as mouth itching and minor abdominal discomfort. Those who had been getting the placebo remained unable to tolerate doses higher than the 40 mg of milk powder without having an allergic reaction. In the group receiving milk protein, the lowest tolerance dose was 2, 540 mg (2.5 ounces) and the highest was 8,140 mg (8 ounces). Lab tests showed the children who regularly drank or ate milk had more antibodies to milk in their blood, yet were able to better tolerate milk than those who took the placebo. Researchers say, tolerance in children treated with milk continued to build over time, and recommend that these children continue to consume milk daily to maintain their resistance. The researchers caution that it remains unclear whether the children would maintain their tolerance once they stop consuming milk regularly. "It may very well be that this tolerance is lost once the immune system is no longer exposed to the allergen daily," Wood says.

The Hopkins group is currently studying oral immunotherapy in children with egg allergy to determine whether increasingly higher doses of egg protein can help resolve their allergy, and have recently started another study of milk immunotherapy.

Wood emphasizes the findings require further research and advises parents and caregivers not to try oral immunotherapy without medical supervision.


'/>"/>

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-516-4996
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Heavy Drinking Boosts Stroke Risk for Chinese Men
2. Good Cholesterol Wont Help Heavy-Drinking Older Men
3. Drinking Often Spurs Move to Poorer Neighborhoods
4. Underage drinking starts before adolescence
5. Briefing on a new Web resource to address global drinking water crisis
6. Family history of alcoholism affects response to drug used to treat heavy drinking
7. Teenage Drinking Can Spell Lasting Trouble
8. Alcohol and cancer: is drinking the new smoking?
9. Kids still not drinking enough milk
10. Parents Encouraged to Set an Example for Their Teens and Help Stop Underage Drinking
11. Morrison Takes Aim at Underage Drinking in New Radio Campaign
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/6/2016)... PA (PRWEB) , ... May 06, 2016 , ... ... does to reduce fat areas around the body, is the most popular ... survey results just released make perfect sense to cosmetic surgeon Dr. Richard Buckley, ...
(Date:5/6/2016)... ... May 06, 2016 , ... From May 4 to ... offering EarQ members the unique opportunity to learn more about Signia’s technology and the ... growth. , “It is our priority to see practices succeed in this highly competitive ...
(Date:5/6/2016)... ... 2016 , ... The International Yoga Teacher Training schoo l will ... close to the town famous for its sunsets, Oia. This all inclusive yoga training ... have an amazing experience in Greece, we just can’t stay away” says Co-Founder Carri ...
(Date:5/6/2016)... , ... May 06, 2016 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House ... worldwide, what he has found in the Bible about helping to stop cancer. Yisrayl says ... it is his hope that the health and science industries will pay close attention and ...
(Date:5/6/2016)... ... May 06, 2016 , ... This Mother’s Day kicks ... everywhere. The 17th annual National Women’s Health Week takes place May 8-May ... Health are combining forces to empower women to make their health a top priority. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/6/2016)... May 6, 2016 Appoints ... and its Application to Drug Development Including Development of ... , the life sciences consulting firm, today announced that ... an Associate Partner in its Cambridge, MA ... Miller, PhD, in the firm,s Medical Imaging consulting practice ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... International plc (NASDAQ: ENDP ) (TSX: ENL) today ... president of Allergan, Inc. and current CEO of Chase Pharmaceuticals ... TPG Capital, to its Board of Directors. The appointments are ... recently embarked on a search for new Board members who ... and Todd are experienced leaders, and we are extremely pleased ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... DUBLIN , May 5, 2016 ... "Market Report for PET Imaging in the USA"  report ... ,This report provides information on the current Positron Emission ... USA market. Along with the ... the USA , the report also ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: