Navigation Links
Drink a Little, Stay Active, Save Your Heart
Date:1/9/2008

The combination could add years to your life, Danish researchers find

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking in moderation and keeping physically active is the formula for keeping heart disease at bay, Danish researchers report.

In fact, people who didn't drink and weren't physically active had a 30 percent to 49 percent higher risk of developing heart disease than people who drank, exercised or did both.

"This study is consistent with a number of prior studies which have shown that leisure-time physical activity and moderate alcohol consumption are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality," said Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

"However, it is very important to note that these findings, especially with regards to alcohol consumption, have never been confirmed in randomized clinical trials and need to be before any recommendations can be made regarding the use of alcohol for cardiovascular risk reduction," Fonarow cautioned.

In the study, Morten Gronbaek, director of research at the National Institute of Public Health at the University of Southern Denmark in Copenhagen and his colleagues collected data on 11,914 Danish men and women aged 20 and older who took part in the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

During an average of 20 years follow-up, 1,242 people died from heart disease and 5,901 died from other causes, according to the report in the Jan. 9 issue of the European Heart Journal.

Among both men and women, being physically active was associated with a significantly lower risk for fatal heart disease and dying from any other cause compared with being physically inactive.

In addition, drinking was associated with a lower risk of fatal heart disease than not drinking. Moderate drinking reduced the risk of death among men and women. However, among heavy drinkers the risk of dying was similar to non-drinkers, the researchers found.

Among people who were physical active, those who didn't drink had a 30 percent to 31 percent higher risk of fatal heart disease compared with moderate drinkers.

However, among people who didn't drink but had a moderate or high level of physical activity, their risk of fatal heart disease was reduced up to 33 percent compared to those who didn't exercise or drink.

In fact, those who had at least one drink a week and were physically active had a 44 percent to 50 percent lower risk of dying from heart disease than those who were physically inactive and didn't drink.

Moreover, people who were physically active and had a drink a week had up to a 33 percent lower risk of dying from any cause, Gronbaek's group found.

"Physical activity and a moderate alcohol intake can lower the risk of fatal heart disease and all-cause mortality. But neither physical activity alone nor alcohol intake can completely reverse the increased risk associated with physical inactivity and alcohol abstention. Thus, both physical activity and alcohol intake are important to lower the risk of fatal heart disease and all-cause mortality," the researchers concluded.

One expert sees physical activity and moderate drinking as parts of a healthy lifestyle.

"The key messages of this study, based on a large cohort, are reaffirmations of what we already know, not revelations," said Dr. David Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "Moderate alcohol intake reduces the risk of heart disease. Moderate physical activity does so, too, and even more powerfully. Combine the two, and the benefits are additive."

However, Katz stressed that practices that promote health are most powerful when combined into an overall pattern of healthful living.

"Combing regular physical activity with not just moderate alcohol intake, but a healthful dietary pattern, adequate sleep, effective management of stress, and avoidance of tobacco, and you can slash your risk of heart disease and premature death from any cause, dramatically," Katz said.

More information

For more on heart disease, visit the American Heart Association.



SOURCES: Gregg C. Fonarow, M.D., professor, cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles; David Katz, M.D., M.P.H., director, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; Jan. 9, 2008, European Heart Journal


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Heavy Drinking Boosts Stroke Risk for Chinese Men
2. Good Cholesterol Wont Help Heavy-Drinking Older Men
3. Drinking Often Spurs Move to Poorer Neighborhoods
4. Underage drinking starts before adolescence
5. Briefing on a new Web resource to address global drinking water crisis
6. Joint Juice Launches New Ready-to-Drink Glucosamine & Vitamin-Enhanced Dietary Supplement Water Nationwide
7. Family history of alcoholism affects response to drug used to treat heavy drinking
8. Teenage Drinking Can Spell Lasting Trouble
9. Worldwide Probiotic Drink, Yakult(R), Launches in Its First Major U.S. Market
10. Alcohol and cancer: is drinking the new smoking?
11. Chocolate Milk: The Official Drink of Halloween
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Drink a Little, Stay Active, Save Your Heart
(Date:9/21/2017)... Falls Church, VA (PRWEB) , ... September 21, ... ... **An FDAnews Webinar**, Sept. 26, 2017 — 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET, ... exacting business. It’s easy to get things wrong, run afoul of The Quality ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... September 21, 2017 , ... ... lunch and learn with Infinity Behavioral Health Services for professionals in the addiction ... a Commercial Payer Audit . , Insurance companies and state and federal ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... IL. (PRWEB) , ... September 21, 2017 , ... ... results released today of a new member survey conducted by the International ... restoration procedures performed from 2014 to 2016 rose 60 percent, with 635,189 procedures ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... San Diego, Ca (PRWEB) , ... September 21, 2017 , ... ... and affordable services to its customers, and give back to the community. For over ... on of the most successful companies serving plumbing in San Diego. They ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... , ... September 21, 2017 , ... ... Microscan’s LVS 7510 at the Global GS1 Healthcare Conference 2017 in Chicago, IL ... life-sciences industry for ensuring label quality and improving patient safety. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/6/2017)... ORANGEBURG, N.Y. , Sept. 6, 2017   PDI ... today announced it will host an educational session focused ... line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention at the 2017 Annual ... meeting, which will take place at the ... Arizona from Sept. 16-19, will also feature ...
(Date:9/5/2017)... Inc. has announced another milestone in their continued growth and success of the ... demands of customer engagements regionally.  ... office is located at 318 West Adams Street, Suite 1528, Chicago, IL ... Xyntek's recently opened Midwest office ... In addition ...
(Date:9/1/2017)... Michael Penna , President and CEO ... for growth in his response to the July 13, ... seeking a buyer for eMDs. Penna,s company, Complete HealthCare ... Value Added Reseller and national leader in the independent ... "As the healthcare market continues to dictate consolidation, healthcare ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: