Navigation Links
Dolphins could be ideal model to study human cervical cancer, UF veterinarians say
Date:2/18/2010

After testing dozens of samples from marine mammals, University of Florida aquatic animal health experts say dolphins may be the ideal model for the study of cervical cancer in people.

"We discovered that dolphins get multiple infections of apillomaviruses, which are known to be linked with cervical cancer in women," said Hendrik Nollens, a marine mammal biologist and clinical assistant professor at UF's College of Veterinary Medicine today (Feb. 18) at the annual meeting of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science. "Dolphins are the only species besides humans that we know of that can harbor coinfections, or infections of multiple papillomavirus types, in the genital mucosa."

There are approximately 100 types of human papillomaviruses, and multiple-type infections of up to eight HPV types have been reported in humans, he said.

"Even more surprisingly, some virus groups have shown the ability to cross the marine-terrestrial ecosystem boundary from sea to land," Nollens said. "We have demonstrated at least one case of genetic recombination between viruses of human and marine mammals. So while it's exciting that dolphins can provide a unique window into the role of coinfection in human cervical cancer, we can't rule out that the next high risk virus, such as SARS, or West Nile, might actually come from the marine environment."

The presence of coinfections is believed to be one of the biggest risk factors for the development of cervical cancer in humans, Nollens said, although he added that there is no evidence that dolphins develop the disease.

"Why do people develop the disease, but dolphins don't? If we can figure out why, the human medical community might be very interested in how that information might be applied to human strategies for preventing the disease," he said.

Of all creatures that inhabit the ocean, dolphins and other marine mammals are the closest relatives of humans, but scientific knowledge of infectious diseases, particularly viral diseases, affecting these animals is limited, researchers say. No animals are harmed during collection of cell and tissue samples, although some are obtained from animals that have died of natural causes in the wild.

In hopes of shedding more light on the nature, prevalence and potential of such diseases to be passed to humans, Nollens and his colleagues at UF's Marine Animal Disease Laboratory have embarked on a large-scale collaborative research project to catalogue previously unrecognized and emerging viruses of marine mammals, both in collections and in the wild.

Over a four-year period, some 1,500 blood, tissue and fecal samples from taken from dolphins have been analyzed at different laboratories across the United States, Nollens said.

"Some 90 percent of what we do in the laboratory is molecular analyses," Nollens said. "Because of advances in molecular medicine since January 2006, we've found more than 40 new viruses in dolphins alone. When the last textbook came out in 2003, only 19 were noted."

All viruses found in the laboratory and suspected of having pathogenic potential are further evaluated to assess the impact each virus could have on the health of individual dolphins, he added. The potential impact on collection animals as well as free-ranging dolphin populations is assessed, with information then used to generate guidelines for disease outbreak management and prevention strategies.

"This process helps us understand disease and disease prevention," Nollens said, adding that for more than a decade, scientists have been looking for cures to human diseases, including cancer, among marine invertebrates.

"Maybe there will be a similar story with dolphin papilloma viruses and prevention of cervical cancer in humans," he said. "It wouldn't be the first time we've come up with useful information from looking at marine animals."


'/>"/>

Contact: Sarah Carey
careysk@vetmed.ufl.edu
352-294-4242
University of Florida
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Dolphins health shed light on human and ocean health
2. Statistical Bowl - How the 07 Patriots and the 72 Dolphins Match Up
3. Most maternal deaths in sub-Saharan Africa could be avoided
4. UAB-led study shows simple steps could reduce stillbirths by up to 1 million
5. Clinical trial underway: Miniature ultrasound device could revolutionize pain relief
6. Charging less for more effective treatments could reduce health care costs while improving health
7. Chocolate lovers could be lowering their risk of stroke: Study
8. New Book Reveals How Qigong Could Be The Eastern Answer To Botox
9. Tiny fruit fly could offer big clues in fight against obesity, researcher says
10. Six Other E. colis Could Be Lurking In Your Valentine Days Dinner
11. Premature Death Could Await Obese Kids
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... which is has been collaborating with doctors and hospitals to make transformative changes ... the world’s leading cell therapy minds this week in discussing breakthroughs in cellular ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... ... Medical Card reminds us that May is National Stroke Awareness Month. According to the ... death in the United States; someone has one every 40 seconds. Annually, almost 800,000 ... years old. A stroke is when blood flow to the brain is blocked or ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... 28, 2016 , ... April, 28, 2016 – Magee Rehabilitation ... Medicine and Rehabilitation by Philadelphia Magazine. , Philadelphia Magazine’s annual Top Doctors list ... and medical leadership across the country. These select individuals nominate outstanding physicians in ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... , ... Denise McCormick Baich had written poetry dating back to her childhood, but after several ... tsunami and took on a more spiritual tone. The desire to put the words on ... it than just file it away. Friends would ask her how she wrote such wonderful ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Prescription ... co-operative bankruptcy to receive their prescription medications through America’s fastest-growing pharmacy program. ... medications from over 180 American pharmaceutical companies for $35 per month, per ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... , April 27, 2016 ... a developer of a new generation of drugs ... overall survival results for Paclical/Apealea in the Phase ... patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. These preliminary results ... in combination with carboplatin versus Taxol in combination ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO) is pleased ... Pharm D., to Vice President of Education and Quality. ... will continue to lead and oversee Diplomat University, an ... and training to Diplomat employees and external professionals on ... also houses the quality assurance department, which focuses on ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition ... the Biological Medicine Industry in China 2016"  report to ... financial assessment and credit risk of the biological medicine ... provides readers with an in-depth understanding of the industry ... aware of. It considers current and future drivers, challenge ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: