Navigation Links
Discovery could lead to anti-clotting drugs with less risk of bleeding
Date:10/28/2013

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered a molecular switch that causes small, beneficial clots that stop bleeding to enlarge further during wound healing. By blocking this switch in lab mice, the researchers prevented small clots from growing -- a process that can pose a danger in humans -- while preserving their ability to staunch bleeding. Their findings, published online in Nature, open up the possibility for developing potent anti-clotting drugs that don't raise the risk of bleeding.

"Existing anti-clotting drugs significantly reduce the body's ability to form blood clots, so people on these drugs are at risk of serious bleeding," says Xiaoping Du, professor of pharmacology in the UIC College of Medicine and lead author of the paper. "By exploiting this switch we found, we can develop very powerful drugs that prevent the big clots that cause heart attacks and strokes, while preserving the body's ability to form the smaller, primary clots you need to stop bleeding."

Anti-clotting drugs, also known as blood thinners, can help prevent strokes, heart attacks, and deep vein clots. They are also prescribed to reduce the risk of dangerous clots after surgery. But the drugs also increase the risk of bleeding, and must be used with great care.

Du and colleagues investigated a protein called integrin, found in the cell membrane of platelets, the specialized blood cells that form clots to stop bleeding. Signals given off by injured or torn blood vessels activate integrin, which directs the platelets to bind to the injured blood vessel and to other platelets through a linking-protein called fibrinogen. This cross-linking results in a primary clot, good enough to stop the bleeding in most minor cuts.

The UIC researchers discovered that once fibrinogen gets involved, another molecule called G-alpha-13 latches on to integrin and causes the clot to grow much bigger -- to ensure the bleeding is stopped. Normally, the enlarged clot will shrink back. But in people prone to developing dangerous clots, or in those with narrowed arteries, the enlarged clots can lead to a heart attack or stroke.

Having found that G-alpha-13 is responsible for ramping up the clotting process, the researchers were able to develop a molecule that blocks G-alpha-13 from binding to integrin. Mice given the blocker-drug can form primary clots that stop bleeding but never enter the growth phase.

"This is exciting, because new drugs based on blocking G-alpha-13 can preserve the ability to form primary clots, which are necessary to heal wounds, but will prevent the clots from growing too large and clogging blood vessels," Du said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Scientist awarded $1 million grant to develop tools for hepatitis C treatment discovery
2. Washingtons Life Sciences Discovery Fund awards commercialization grants
3. Discovery could help to develop drugs for organ transplant and cancer patients
4. Feelings of immaturity accompany alcohol misuse into adulthood; discovery could improve treatments
5. H1N1 discovery paves way for universal flu vaccine: UBC research
6. Scientists make breakthrough in bile duct cancer with discovery of new gene mutations
7. Researchers make promising discovery in pursuit of effective lymphoma treatments
8. Discovery suggests new combination therapy strategy for basal-like breast cancers
9. Discovery of Gene May Lead to New Male Contraceptive
10. 5 more pharmaceutical companies join NIH initiative to speed therapeutic discovery
11. Illnesses in Colorado childrens hospital prompts discovery of contaminated alcohol pads
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/22/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 22, 2017 , ... ... Bragdon to its Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Division of Hand, Upper Extremity and ... orthopedic surgery. She is board-certified in both Orthopedics and Hand Surgery. ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... NJ (PRWEB) , ... March 22, 2017 , ... ... firm that serves communities throughout north Jersey and the New York metropolitan region, ... to provide regional support for homeless families. , At present, more than two ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... 22, 2017 , ... The Jim Shortridge Agency, an Oklahoma ... owners, is joining the Teen Recovery Solutions organization in a charity event intended ... number of Oklahoma teens and adolescents face problems from drugs, alcohol, abuse, and ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 22, 2017 , ... ... services and financial planning assistance to communities throughout central Ohio, is initiating a ... , Estimates from the Department of Defense and the Veteran's Brain Injury Center ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 22, 2017 , ... ... guarantee patient payments for providers while creating a positive patient experience. , ... that further educates and empowers patients by helping them understand their financial responsibility. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/22/2017)... 22, 2017 Hologic, Inc. (Nasdaq: ... acquisition of Cynosure, Inc., a leader in medical aesthetics ... "We are pleased to complete our acquisition ... Michael Davin and the entire Cynosure team to ... medical aesthetics market," said Steve MacMillan , Hologic,s ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 22, 2017 FinancialBuzz.com News Commentary ... rapidly due to the significant development and innovation in ... Market Research, the global electrophysiology market was worth $3.42 ... billion by 2022, with a GAGR of 13.4%. Electrophysiology ... diagnose abnormal heartbeats or arrhythmia. The report indicates that ...
(Date:3/22/2017)...  As the world,s leading non-profit dedicated to fighting ... played a role in most therapies used today to ... helping patients with other cancers and serious diseases. Such ... cutting-edge research – more than $1 billion in the ... record-breaking sum of $4.1 million raised at the 30 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: