Navigation Links
Discovery could improve hepatitis C treatment
Date:9/23/2009

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers are part of an international team that has discovered a genetic variation that could identify those people infected with hepatitis C who are most likely to benefit from current treatments.

Dr Melanie Bahlo and Dr Max Moldovan from the institute's Bioinformatics division worked with researchers from the University of Sydney and elsewhere to analyse the genomes of more than 800 people, including more than 300 Australians, who were receiving treatment for chronic hepatitis C infection.

Their genome-wide association study of people receiving hepatitis C treatment revealed that genetic variants near the interferon gene IL28B were associated with people's response to treatment.

Three per cent of the world's people are infected with hepatitis C and few are able to clear the virus without treatment.

The standard treatment is a combination of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin (PEG-IFN-alpha/RBV). However this treatment is expensive ($20,000 per person in Australia), can have serious adverse effects and is unsuccessful in 50-60 per cent of cases.

At present it is not possible to identify the 40-50 per cent of people who will respond well to treatment.

To address this problem, Dr Moldovan and Dr Bahlo are building and evaluating statistical models that incorporate genetic variants, in combination with clinical and baseline factors, to best predict treatment outcome.

Through this approach the research team found that people having a specific genetic profile at a genetic variant called rs8099917 showed the strongest virological response when undergoing treatment.

The research results were published online last week in the international journal Nature Genetics. Two other research papers validating the same finding have been published in the past month.

Dr Bahlo said with the knowledge of the gene variants it would be possible to develop a diagnostic test, based on a person's genetic profile, to identify those who are likely to respond to treatment with PEG-IFN-alpha/RBV.

Further, the location of the newly-discovered genetic variant opens the way for development of a more effective hepatitis C treatment, which is likely to result in fewer adverse effects than PEG-IFN-alpha/RBV.

Finding effective treatments is essential as many people infected with hepatitis C become chronic carriers of the disease and may develop liver cirrhosis or liver cancer.


'/>"/>

Contact: Penny Fannin
fannin@wehi.edu.au
61-393-452-345
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Discoverys Edge Fall Issue -- http://discoverysedge.mayo.edu/
2. 3rd Annual Collaborative Drug Discovery - UCSF Community Meeting for Catalyzing Humanitarian and Commercial Research to be Held October 1st
3. Discovery May Pave Way to Better Diabetes Care
4. Alzheimers Drug Discovery Foundation Funds Abiant, Inc. to Develop a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging Diagnostic for Alzheimers Disease
5. Aging Science Leaders to Gather During Active Aging Week to Encourage Discovery in Healthy Living and Longevity
6. Genetic Discovery May Improve Hepatitis C Treatment
7. New discovery brings hope to treatment of lymphatic diseases
8. Immune System Gene Discovery Sheds Light on Staph Infections
9. Cell Discovery May Bring Science Closer to Diabetes Cure
10. The Psychology of Frailty: An Identity Crisis Among the Elderly - Alzheimers Drug Discovery Foundations Dr. Howard Fillit to Co-Chair Symposium
11. Toronto researchers discovery points to a new treatment avenue for acute myeloid leukemia
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Discovery could improve hepatitis C treatment
(Date:12/8/2016)... Tampa, FL (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 ... ... been awarded accreditation with distinction by the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS), ... patients with advanced care and patient safety. Only a few hospitals and facilities ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... ZyDoc ... Language Processing–Enabled and Conventional Data Capture Methods for Input to Electronic Health Records: ... , Results of the comparative usability study demonstrate that a dictation-based method (“NLP ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... CURE Media Group, the nation’s leading ... has aligned with Upstage Lung Cancer in efforts to combat lung cancer, announced CURE ... Hennessy, Jr said, “CURE Media Group is honored to team up with Upstage Lung ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... Premier Fitness Camp (PFC) and The Chopra ... weight loss and wellness program, at their world headquarters of Omni La Costa Resort ... long-term results to anyone seeking weight loss, personal development, a healthy lifestyle, or mental ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... Catalent Pharma Solutions, the leading ... consumer health products, today announced that it had joined the Pharmaceutical Supply Chain ... organization to unite pharmaceutical and healthcare companies that share a vision of better, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/9/2016)... LONDON , December 9, 2016 ... ICD, Subcutaneous ICD, Single-Chamber ICD, Dual-Chamber ICD, Cardiac ... External Defibrillators, Wearable Cardioverter Defibrillators The ... grow at a CAGR of 5.3% from 2016-2020 ... is expected to grow at a CAGR of ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "High ... offering. ... analyses the market by the following Technology Types: Label-Free Technology, Cell-Based Assay, ... Canada , Japan , Europe ... , and Rest of World. Annual estimates and forecasts ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the ... 2021" report to their offering. ... Market growth can be ... the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry and technological advancements like automation ... markets and growing research activities in toxicology and stem cells ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: