Navigation Links
Disabled Workers Often Face Abuse: Study
Date:3/6/2013

WEDNESDAY, March 6 (HealthDay News) -- Disabled people are twice as likely to be attacked at work as other employees, and they also are more likely to be insulted, ridiculed and intimidated on the job, a new study finds.

British researchers interviewed nearly 4,000 employees and found that the 284 participants with a disability or long-term illness had higher rates of 21 types of ill treatment than other workers.

This abuse often came from co-workers and managers, and included being given impossible deadlines and being ignored, gossiped about or teased, according to the study, which was published March 5 in the journal Work, Employment and Society.

Among the people with disabilities or long-term illnesses:

  • More than 10 percent had suffered physical violence at work versus less than 5 percent of other employees.
  • More than 7 percent had been injured at work as a result of aggression, compared with less than 4 percent of other employees.
  • More than 12 percent had been humiliated or ridiculed on the job, compared with about 7 percent of other employees.
  • About 24 percent had been insulted at work, compared with about 14 percent of other employees.
  • Nearly 35 percent had been shouted at, compared with about 23 percent of other employees.

Those with a psychological or learning disability usually suffered more abuse than those with physical disabilities or long-term physical-health problems. Among those with a psychological or learning disability, about 21 percent had suffered physical violence, about 44 percent had been insulted and nearly 57 percent had been shouted at.

The analysis of data from the British Workplace Behavior Survey found that the workers with disabilities or long-term illnesses said managers were responsible for 45 percent of the more serious incidents of ill treatment, customers or clients for 28 percent, and colleagues for 18 percent.

"Up to now, researchers have generally assumed that ill treatment in the workplace was causing disabilities and health problems," lead researcher Ralph Fevre, a professor in the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University in Wales, said in a journal news release. "Our work suggests ill treatment happens to employees who already have disabilities or health problems."

"Any one of these forms of ill treatment could have an adverse effect on their productivity and, in turn, shore up assumptions about the lack of productive worth of people with disabilities," the researchers wrote. "The efforts employees with disabilities make to escape ill treatment may also exacerbate their marginalization in less productive and less well-paid jobs, or even lead to their withdrawal from the labor market altogether."

More information

The U.S. Office of Disability Employment Policy provides advice on how disabled people can find and excel in a job.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Work, Employment and Society, news release, March 5, 2013


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Good intentions bring mixed results for Haitis disabled people
2. New initiative aims to increase mobility for disabled children worldwide
3. Disabled Kids 4 Times More Likely to Suffer Violence: Study
4. Disabled Americans Battle for Access to Hotel Pools
5. Parents of Severely Disabled Kids Say They Enrich Their Lives
6. Dental Woes Abound for Developmentally Disabled: Study
7. Mobile Prone Stander for Disabled Children Designed by Prime Engineering Now Offered by Rehabmart.com
8. Obese Workers Health Care Costs Top Those of Smokers
9. Many Call Center Workers Plagued by Voice Woes
10. OSHAs Safety Tests Protect Workers at Little Cost: Study
11. 5 percent of workers gave up smoking when the anti-tobacco law took effect
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Disabled Workers Often Face Abuse: Study
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... ... A book about the self-discovery of one’s limitless creative power, “ Unleash Your ... give readers the courage they need to embrace their creativity and unleash it as ... my life to learn and create what I set my heart with no limits ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 31, 2016 , ... "ProDrop 3D ... projects to the next level," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... Studios. With ProDrop 3D Abstract have the ability to generate and manipulate three-dimensional shapes ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... ... According to recent statistics, there are nearly half a million physical therapists ... physical therapy professional and every clinic has a duty to perform at the highest ... competitive industry is also essential. The solution that many physical therapy leaders turn to ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 01, 2016 , ... ... “ Psoriasis and smoking: links and risks ”. , As corresponding author Professor ... on the relation between smoking habits and psoriasis. Smoking influences the onset and ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... May 31, 2016 , ... ... that considers individuals’ genetic characteristics and the physical and behavioral worlds in ... in sync. In personalized medicine, diagnosing an individual’s disease depends on accurately ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/31/2016)... May 31, 2016 Aloe vera ... food, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, with global volume to surpass ... 1.6 Bn. Demand for aloe vera extracts ... yogurts will continue its upward momentum in 2016 as ... boost positive sentiment on aloe vera, with wide-ranging applications ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... , May 31, 2016 The global ... coupled with surging prevalence of deaths from chronic diseases. According ... By Region, By Country): Opportunities and Forecasts (2016-2021) - (By ... Orthopaedic, Cardiovascular, Plastic Surgery, Wound Care); By Region-North America, ... UK, Germany , Italy ...
(Date:5/31/2016)... May 31, 2016 , Isansys  Lifecare, ... its Patient Status Engine wireless patient monitoring platform, as it ... Germany , Scotland and ... 2 nd generation system, launched earlier this year, is now ... , , This new technology significantly enhances ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: