Navigation Links
Differences in staging and treatment likely to be behind UK's low bowel cancer survival
Date:4/16/2013

Incomplete diagnostic investigation and failure to get the best treatment are the most likely reasons why survival for bowel cancer patients is lower in the UK than in other comparable countries, according to new research published in the journal Acta Oncologica.

The research, led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, was carried out in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the UK for the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP). The study included more than 310,000 bowel cancer patients diagnosed during 2000-07.

Bowel cancer is sometimes called colorectal cancer, which includes cancers of the colon and rectum. This study examined both types of bowel cancer.

The researchers examined how far the patients' cancer had spread at the time of diagnosis from very early (localised, stage A) to very late (spread to other parts of the body, stage D). They also examined the proportion of patients at each stage of disease who survived for one year and three years after diagnosis, after correction for the impact of other causes of death.

Two-thirds (67%) of colon cancer patients in the UK survived for at least one year, compared with 80% in Sweden. Three-quarters (75%) of rectal cancer patients in the UK survived for one year or more, compared with 84% in Sweden.

Low overall survival in a particular country can arise either because the patients there tend to be diagnosed at a later stage of disease than in other countries, or because survival at each stage of disease is lower than in other countries.

The proportion of colon cancer patients diagnosed at the earliest stage (stage A) was lowest in the UK - only 8% compared with 11-17% elsewhere. But UK patients were also less likely to be diagnosed at the most advanced stage (20% at stage D, compared with 24-31% elsewhere).

For both colon and rectal cancer, survival among UK patients diagnosed at the earliest stage of disease (stage A) was similar to that in the other five countries (96%, compared to 92-98% elsewhere), but survival in the UK was consistently lower for those diagnosed at a more advanced stage (5-11% lower than elsewhere).

The researchers used population-based data for all patients diagnosed in a given country or region, not just the small proportion of patients included in clinical trials. The international differences in survival may arise from differences in the availability or use of diagnostic tests, and in the use of surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy at each stage of diagnosis. Countries do not all collect information on stage at diagnosis in the same way, however, and this can cause artefacts in international survival comparisons.

Camille Maringe, lead author based at the Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, said: "Accurate investigation of how far the cancer has spread (the stage) when it is diagnosed is essential for clinicians to be able to offer their patients the most appropriate treatment. This will increase survival. Investigation does not appear to be as thorough in the UK as in other countries, and except for patients with local tumours, survival is lower than in other countries at each stage of disease.

"We observed international differences in survival at each stage of disease. These differences are wider for older patients, and for patients whose disease is very advanced when they are diagnosed.

"Improvements are urgently needed in the quality and thoroughness of the medical tests that are used to assess the stage at diagnosis for each patient. The data collected by cancer registries on stage at diagnosis also need to be more accurate and complete. This will enable more accurate international comparisons of survival at each stage of disease. In turn, it will enable patients, doctors and healthcare planners to see which countries are setting the best standards, and what improvements are required to reach the highest levels of survival."


'/>"/>

Contact: Katie Steels
press@lshtm.ac.uk
44-020-792-92802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study finds significant skull differences between closely linked groups
2. Mayo Clinic study links healthy muscle mass to healthy bones, finds differences by gender
3. Racial differences in diabetes diagnostic thresholds
4. Are there gender differences in anti-HIV drug efficacy?
5. BUSM/VA researchers uncover gender differences in the effects of long-term alcoholism
6. Individual gene differences can be tested in zebrafish
7. Scientists Find Gene Differences in Nonsmokers With Lung Cancer
8. Stanford/Yale study gives insight into subtle genomic differences among our own cells
9. Researchers discover gender-based differences in Alzheimers disease
10. CT depicts racial differences in coronary artery disease
11. U of T Researchers uncover major source of evolutionary differences among species
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/26/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 26, 2017 , ... ... specifically to improve the profitability of ready-to-drink, high-protein beverages by helping beverage manufacturers ... alternative to dairy proteins, providing direct cost savings as well as more stable ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... , ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... and collaboration, announces Mirroring360 Pro . This new addition to the Mirroring360 ... experience for education and business. , Mirroring360 Pro enables educators, business professionals and ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... CEOs, CFOs and HR decision-makers are preparing for how his administration could impact ... will provide insight into what changes are most likely to make it through ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... , ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... a modern procedure that achieves results in a fraction of the time as ... Vegas, NV, with Significance Dental Specialists, now offers this revolutionary treatment with or ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... MN (PRWEB) , ... April 25, 2017 , ... Buyers ... and recreational users to dispensaries and head shops –can’t help but be heartened by ... for the tell-tale cannabis odor aptly described as “skunk smell.” At last they ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced ... Services Market Analysis By Service (Manufacturing, Research), By Country, (Brazil, ... 2025" report to their offering. ... The Latin American pharmaceutical contract manufacturing services ... Low drug registration cost in Latin American countries ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... April 19, 2017  IRIDEX Corporation (Nasdaq: ... results for the first quarter 2017 after the close ... management team will host a corresponding conference call beginning ... Investors interested in listening to the conference call ... callers or (703) 326-3030 for international callers, using conference ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... PUNE, India , April 19, 2017 ... Type and Application, Forecast to 2022 report has covered and ... provides statistics and information on market size, shares and growth ... with major drivers, challenges and opportunities in the global market. ... Browse 152 Tables and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: