Navigation Links
Differences in generic pill characteristics may lead to interruptions in essential medication use
Date:12/31/2012

Boston, MAGeneric medications currently account for over 70 percent of prescriptions dispensed. However, while generic drugs are clinically bioequivalent to the brand-name version, they often differ in their physical characteristics, such as color and shape. Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have found that some patients who receive generic drugs that vary in their color are over 50 percent more likely to stop taking the drug, leading to potentially important and potentially adverse clinical effects.

The study will be published electronically on December 31, 2012 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Pill appearance has long been suspected to be linked to medication adherence, yet this is the first empirical analysis that we know of that directly links pills' physical characteristics to patients' adherence behavior," explained Aaron S. Kesselheim MD, JD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics at BWH, and principal investigator of this study. "We found that changes in pill color significantly increase the odds that patients will stop taking their drugs as prescribed."

The researchers conducted a case-control study of patients taking antiepileptic drugs and compared the odds that patients who did not refill their medication had been given pills that differed in color or shape from the prior prescriptions. Using a large national database of filled prescriptions, when the researchers identified a break in the patient's use of the drug, they looked at the previous two prescription fillings to see if they were the same color and shape. They found that interruptions in the prescription filling occurred significantly more frequently when the pills had different color. Interruptions in antiepileptic drug use for even a few days can raise the risk of seizure and have important medical and social consequences for patients.

These findings offer important take-home messages for physicians, pharmacists, and patients. As Kesselheim explained, "Patients should be aware that their pills may change color and shape, but that even differently-appearing generic drugs are approved by the FDA as being bioequivalent to their brand-name counterparts and are safe to take. Physicians should be aware that changes in pill appearance might explain their patients' non-adherence. Finally, pharmacists should make a point to tell patients about the change in color and shape when they change generic suppliers."

Researchers acknowledge that medication adherence is a multi-faceted issue, but suggest that taking steps to permit (or even require) similarity in pill appearance among bioequivalent brand name and generic drugs may offer a relatively simple way to contribute to better adherence.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jessica Maki
jmaki3@partners.org
617-534-1603
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study finds significant skull differences between closely linked groups
2. Mayo Clinic study links healthy muscle mass to healthy bones, finds differences by gender
3. Racial differences in diabetes diagnostic thresholds
4. Are there gender differences in anti-HIV drug efficacy?
5. BUSM/VA researchers uncover gender differences in the effects of long-term alcoholism
6. Individual gene differences can be tested in zebrafish
7. Scientists Find Gene Differences in Nonsmokers With Lung Cancer
8. Stanford/Yale study gives insight into subtle genomic differences among our own cells
9. Researchers discover gender-based differences in Alzheimers disease
10. CT depicts racial differences in coronary artery disease
11. U of T Researchers uncover major source of evolutionary differences among species
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... , ... Mercy College is expanding its Graduate Business Programs to the Bronx ... to high demand: Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of Organizational Leadership (MSOL) and ... School of Business Graduate Program Chair Dr. Ray Manganelli said: “We believe that people ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) that it has received accreditation for its ... accreditation of three residency programs that Memorial is currently pursuing, including Pediatrics and ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... Atlanta, Georgia (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... 60 rural hospitals across the Southeast, celebrated the signature of Gov. Nathan Deal on ... by Rep. Geoff Duncan (R - Cumming), offers a 70% tax credit to individuals ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... The White House announced efforts ... more information about their loan terms and accounts, and more protections for borrowers. ... federal and private loans, has reached $1.3 trillion, with 43 million Americans holding ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... infants born with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia have better survival rates if surgery ... diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)—a condition where the diaphragm fails to form completely, letting abdominal ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... April 29, 2016 ReportsnReports.com ... 2016" market research report that provides an overview ... analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug ... (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, ... reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... Glycotope GmbH, a clinical-stage immuno-oncology company built ... Dr. Alfredo Zurlo as Chief Medical Officer. ... years clinical experience and a proven track record in ... at Mologen AG where he was Chief Medical Officer ... held various positions at F Hoffmann La Roche and ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... NEW YORK , April 28, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... will notably complement the company,s valve repair and ... the move also places Abbott more firmly into ... one of the fastest growing device areas, with ... to its recent report,  Advanced Remote Patient ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: