Navigation Links
Diet may cut risk of breast cancer recurrence in women without hot flashes
Date:12/15/2008

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- A secondary analysis of a large, multicenter clinical trial has shown that a diet loaded with fruits, vegetables and fiber and somewhat lower in fat compared to standard federal dietary recommendations cuts the risk of recurrence in a subgroup of early-stage breast cancer survivors women who didn't have hot flashes by approximately 31 percent. These patients typically have higher recurrence and lower survival rates than breast cancer patients who have hot flashes. The study team, led by researchers at the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego, along with six other sites, including the University of California, Davis, reported its results online December 15, 2008, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

The results come on the heels of a report last year on the findings of the original study, the Women's Healthy Eating and Living Trial (WHEL), which compared the effects of the two diets on cancer recurrence in more than 3,000 early-stage breast cancer survivors. That study showed no overall difference in recurrence among the two diet groups.

"Women with early stage breast cancer who have hot flashes have better survival and lower recurrence rates than women who don't have hot flashes," said Ellen B. Gold, Ph.D., professor and chair of the UC Davis Department of Public Health Sciences and first author of the study. "Our results suggest that a major change in diet may help overcome the difference in prognosis between women with and without hot flashes."

"Our interest in looking at this subgroup came because hot flashes are associated with lower circulating estrogen levels, while the absence of hot flashes is associated with higher estrogen levels. Reducing the effect of estrogen is a major treatment strategy in breast cancer," said the WHEL study principal investigator John P. Pierce, Ph.D., Sam M. Walton Professor for Cancer Prevention and director of Cancer Prevention and Control at the UC San Diego School of Medicine and the Moores UCSD Cancer Center. "It appears that a dietary pattern high in fruits, vegetables and fiber, which has been shown to reduce circulating estrogen levels, may only be important among women with circulating estrogen levels above a certain threshold."

About 30 percent of the original group of 3,088 breast cancer survivors did not report hot flashes at study entry. The women had been randomly assigned to one of the two diets between 1995 and 2000 and were followed until 2006. About one-half (447) of the "no hot flashes" group were randomized to the special, "intervention" high-vegetable fruit diet while the other half (453) was given the generally recommended diet of five servings of fruits and vegetables a day. The team found that those on the intervention diet had a significantly lower rate of a second breast cancer event (16.1 percent) compared to those eating the government-recommended five-a-day dietary pattern (23.6 percent).

The dietary effect was even larger (a 47 percent lower risk) in women who had been through menopause.

According to Pierce, another possible mechanism has been proposed recently for why this diet may have affected only 30 percent of the WHEL study population. Women with estrogen receptor-positive cancers usually receive hormone therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors) aimed at combating the effect of circulating estrogen. However, more than 30 percent of these women appear to have a gene-drug interaction that prevents them from getting an effective dose of this therapy.

"This hypothesis says that if the endocrine therapy is working, no further reduction in estrogen levels would be needed," said Pierce. "If your genes are preventing you from getting a therapeutic dose, then following this rigorous dietary pattern may reduce estrogen levels enough to reduce risk." Because this is speculation, he said, the research team will be using biological samples collected throughout the study to further investigate the mechanisms behind the study diet's protective effects.


'/>"/>

Contact: Charles Casey
charles.casey@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
University of California - Davis - Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. US Oncology Research Network Presents Clinical Studies at San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
2. Planned safety analysis of a breast cancer prevention study reveals encouraging news for Exemestane
3. Breast cancer risk varies in young women with benign breast disease, Mayo Clinic researchers say
4. Tau protein expression predicts breast cancer survival -- though not as expected
5. Genomic Health Announces Study Establishing the Utility of Oncotype DX(R) in Node-Negative and Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Aromatase Inhibitors
6. Mayo researchers find potential links between breast density and breast cancer risk
7. Progress Made in Predicting Breast Cancer Risk
8. Risk Info for Breast Cancer Patients Too Confusing
9. HRT Users Who Get Breast Cancer Less Likely to Die
10. Early stage, HER2-positive breast cancer patients at increased risk of recurrence
11. Wyeth Announces Positive Data from Phase 2 Study of Neratinib in Advanced HER-2-Positive Breast Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... In response to meager public ... unaware of the plight of aphasia. In collaboration with the American Aphasia Association, ... , The link between stroke and aphasia is relatively unknown, but through collaboration ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... Aimed ... by inspiring human interest stories, courtesy of leaders in the nursing and health ... the industry, from leading advocates and associations—namely Jones & Bartlett Learning. , Jones ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 27, 2016 , ... ... in scholarships to students studying complementary medicine. Allison Outerbridge is this year’s ... her award on May 18 at the university’s Student Leadership Awards ceremony. , ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 26, 2016 , ... Despite last week’s media reports hinting at a June ... wait until March 2017 for an interest rate increase, according to Rajeev Dhawan of ... , “The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) dot charts are of interest to the ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... , ... W.S. Badger Co. Inc ., the maker of certified organic ... Works Award for its use of effective workplace strategies to increase business and employee ... by the Families and Work Institute (FWI) and the Society for Human Resource Management ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/27/2016)... PUNE, India , May 27, 2016 ... in the instances of hypertension is driving ambulatory blood ... muscles lose their elasticity and their ability to respond ... blood pressure. This condition can lead to various cardiovascular ... and peripheral vascular disease. These diseases are growing in ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... -- The healthcare sector is large and ... falling under its umbrella.  A rather overlooked sector are ... about, these healthcare companies are still trying to prove ... by far the largest consumer of the healthcare market ... Nutranomics Inc. (OTC: NNRX), KollagenX Corp. (OTCQB: KGNX), Bioelectronics ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... , May 26, 2016   ... software and analytics, network solutions and technology-enabled ... announced it entered into a strategic channel ... of outpatient software solutions and revenue cycle ... specialty hospitals and rehabilitation clinics to optimize ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: