Navigation Links
Detecting cocaine 'naturally'
Date:2/13/2013

This press release is available in French.

Montral, February 13, 2013 Since the beginning of time, living organisms have developed ingenious mechanisms to monitor their environment. As part of an international study, a team of researchers has adapted some of these natural mechanisms to detect specific molecules such as cocaine more accurately and quickly. Their work may greatly facilitate the rapid screeningless than five minutesof many drugs, infectious diseases, and cancers.

Professor Alexis Valle-Blisle of the University of Montreal Department of Chemistry has worked with Professor Francesco Ricci of the University of Rome Tor Vergata and Professor Kevin W. Plaxco of the University of California at Santa Barbara to improve a new biosensing nanotechnology. The results of the study were recently published in the Journal of American Chemical Society (JACS).

Toward a new generation of screening tests

"Nature is a continuing source of inspiration for developing new technologies," says Professor Francesco Ricci, senior author of the study. "Many scientists are currently working to develop biosensor technology to detectdirectly in the bloodstream and in secondsdrug, disease, and cancer molecules."

"The most recent rapid and easy-to-use biosensors developed by scientists to determine the levels of various molecules such as drugs and disease markers in the blood only do so when the molecule is present in a certain concentration, called the concentration window," adds Professor Valle-Blisle. "Below or above this window, current biosensors lose much of their accuracy."

To overcome this limitation, the international team looked at nature: "In cells, living organisms often use inhibitor or activator molecules to automatically program the sensitivity of their receptors (sensors), which are able to identify the precise amount of thousand of molecules in seconds," explains Professor Valle-Blisle. "We therefore decided to adapt these inhibition, activation, and sequestration mechanisms to improve the efficiency of artificial biosensors."

The researchers put their idea to the test by using an existing cocaine biosensor and revising its design so that it would respond to a series of inhibitor molecules. They were able to adapt the biosensor to respond optimally even with a large concentration window. "What is fascinating," says Alessandro Porchetta, a doctoral student at the University of Rome, "is that we were successful in controlling the interactions of this system by mimicking mechanisms that occur naturally."

"Besides the obvious applications in biosensor design, I think this work will pave the way for important applications related to the administration of cancer-targeting drugs, an area of increasing importance," says Professor Kevin Plaxco. "The ability to accurately regulate biosensor or nanomachine's activities will greatly increase their efficiency."


'/>"/>
Contact: Julie Gazaille
j.cordeau-gazaille@umontreal.ca
514-343-6796
University of Montreal
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Dentists Play Key Role in Detecting Oral Cancer
2. Detecting malaria early to save lives: New optical technique promises rapid and accurate diagnosis
3. Studies See Advances in Detecting, Treating Pancreatic Cancer
4. New technology represents next-generation tool for detecting substandard and counterfeit medicines
5. Detecting thyroid disease by computer
6. Pharmacists provide additional line of defense for detecting knee osteoarthritis
7. New biomarker may help in detecting gliomas, reports Neurosurgery
8. Amyloid imaging shows promise for detecting cardiac amyloidosis
9. Specific protein triggers changes in neurons in brain reward center linked to cocaine addiction
10. Chronic cocaine use triggers changes in brains neuron structure
11. Anti-cocaine vaccine described in Human Gene Therapy Journal
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent article ... people are unfamiliar with. The article goes on to state that individuals are now ... of these less common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 is World ... with chronic pain and the benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery Center ... with Sickle Cell Disease. , Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder of the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The ... in Dallas that it will receive two significant new grants to support its ... PHA marked its 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists for ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Dr. Amanda Cheng, an ... Dr. Cheng has extensive experience with all areas of orthodontics, including robotic Suresmile ... orthodontics. , Micro-osteoperforation is a revolutionary adjunct to orthodontic treatment. It can ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Topical BioMedics, Inc, makers of Topricin and MyPainAway Pain Relief Products, ... minimum wage raise to $12 an hour by 2020 and then adjusting it yearly to ... value of the minimum wage, assure the wage floor does not erode again, and make ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , , , WHEN: ... , , , , LOCATION: , , , Online, with ... , EXPERT PANELISTS:  , , , Frost & Sullivan,s Global Vice ... Senior Industry Analyst, Divyaa Ravishankar and Unmesh Lal, Program Manager , ... industry is witnessing an exceptional era. Several new demand spaces, such ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 ... Oticon , industry leaders in advanced ... launch of Oticon Opn ™, the world,s first ... of possibilities for IoT devices.      (Photo: ... Oticon introduces a number of ,world firsts,: ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Research and Markets ... Volumes: Global Analysis (United States, China, Japan, Brazil, United ... to their offering. ... healthcare business planners, provides surgical procedure volume data in ... with an in-depth analysis of growth drivers and inhibitors, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: