Navigation Links
Designer diet for prostate cancer

Eating one or more portions of broccoli every week can reduce the risk of prostate cancer, and the risk of localised cancer becoming more aggressive.

For the first time, a research group at the Institute of Food Research led by Professor Richard Mithen has provided an explanation of how eating broccoli might reduce cancer risk based upon studies in men, as opposed to trying to extrapolate from animal models. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer for males in western countries. The research has provided an insight into why eating broccoli can help men stay healthy.

For the study, published in the online, open-access journal PLoS ONE on July 2, men who were at risk of developing prostate cancer ate either 400g of broccoli or 400g of peas per week in addition to their normal diet over 12 months. Tissue samples were taken from their prostate gland before the start of the trial and after 6 and 12 months, and the expression of every gene measured using Affymetrix microarray technology.

It was found that there were more changes in gene expression in men who were on the broccoli-rich diet than on the pea diet, and these changes may be associated with the reduction in the risk of developing cancer, that has been reported in epidemiological studies.

Previous studies have suggested that the fifty percent of the population who have a GSTM1 gene gain more benefit from eating broccoli than those who lack this gene. The study showed that the presence of the GSTM1 gene had a profound effect on the changes in gene expression caused by eating broccoli.

This study fills the gap between observational studies and studies with cell and animal models. While observational studies have shown that diets rich in cruciferous vegetables may reduce the risk of prostate cancer and other chronic disease, they do not provide an explanation of how this occurs. Evidence from animal and cell models has sought to provide an explanation, but these studies are usually based on high doses that would not normally be experienced as part of the diet.

The results of the study suggested that relatively low amounts of cruciferous vegetables in the diet a few portions per week can have large effects on gene expression by changing cell signalling pathways. These signalling pathways are the routes by which information is transmitted through a molecular cascade which amplifies the signal to the nucleus of the cell where gene expression occurs.

The Norwich-based team are currently planning a larger study with men with localised prostate cancer, and will compare the activity of standard broccoli with the special variety of high glucosinolate broccoli used in the current study.

Designer studies for health promotion

"Other fruits and vegetables have been shown to also reduce the risk of prostate cancer and are likely to act through other mechanisms," says Professor Mithen.

"Once we understand these, we can provide much better dietary advice in which specific combinations of fruit and vegetable are likely to be particularly beneficial. Until then, eating two or three portions of cruciferous vegetable per week, and maybe a few more if you lack the GSTM1 gene, should be encouraged."


Contact: Zoe Dunford
Public Library of Science

Related medicine news :

1. UCLA study identifies designer estrogen as potential MS drug
2. Richard Drouant Joins OrthoSynetics(TM) as Graphic Designer
3. Designers Young Cousin Inspiration Behind Colorful School and Office Supplies That Raise Awareness for Leukemia
4. Partners With Fashion Designer Jenni Kayne
5. Ingenuitys Path Designer is Selected as Best New Product by Life Science Community at 2008 Molecular Medicine Conference
6. Tomorrows Top Designers Advance DVT Awareness at Parsons AAS Line Debut Exhibition
7. Melissa Biggs, Fashion Designer and Former Baywatch Actress, Teams with CSL Behring to Raise Awareness of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency, a Commonly Misdiagnosed Respiratory Disease
8. DESIGNER WHEY(R) Launches New PROTEIN BLITZ(TM) Drinks: Protein Like Youve Never Tasted Before
9. Conventional prognostic factors fail to explain better prostate cancer survival in most Asian men
10. First biomarker discovered that predicts prostate cancer outcome
11. Frequent Prostate Screens Fail to Improve Aggressive Cancer Diagnoses
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Smiles by Stevens is ... and moderate facial wrinkling. While many patients are aware of the benefits of Botox® ... Botox® delivers to those suffering with discomfort, soreness, and pain as a result of ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Evanston, IL (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 ... ... homage to six decades of music, friendships, and learning in its 65th Anniversary ... be held Dec. 5-6. , For 65 years, Brillianteen has been ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... Today, ... on our nation’s roadways has dropped below 10,000 for the first time since 2011. ... in 2013. , According to data released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... my cancer, I found that regular bras were incredibly uncomfortable," said an inventor ... this specialized bra." , She developed the patent-pending RECOVERY BRA for added comfort ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... ... Many people know of the common symptoms of low thyroid hormone (also known ... people who find their cholesterol levels and weight are creeping up are more likely ... don’t have any of the other symptoms. , Thyroid hormone plays a major role ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... DUBLIN , November 26, 2015 ... has announced the addition of the  ... in the European Therapeutic Drug Monitoring ... Forecasts, Competitive Intelligence, Emerging Opportunities"  report ... ) has announced the addition ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... November 26, 2015 ... addition of the  "2016 Future Horizons ... Cell Surface Marker Testing Market: Supplier ... to their offering.  --> ... of the  "2016 Future Horizons and ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... WOODBURY, N.Y. , Nov. 25, 2015  Linden ... access and optimizing treatment outcomes for patients suffering from ... its request for a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) enjoining ... between the two companies. --> ... aggressively pursuing all of its legal options. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: