Navigation Links
Depression predicts increases in inflammatory protein linked to heart disease

INDIANAPOLIS Which comes first, depression or inflammation?

To help solve this long standing chicken and egg conundrum, researchers led by Jesse Stewart, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis asked two critical questions. Does depression lead to elevated inflammatory proteins in the human body? Or does an increase in these proteins lead to depression? They found that the answer to the first question appears to be "yes," and the answer to the second question may be "no" among healthy adults.

The researchers report that depressive symptoms are associated with increases over time in interleukin-6, an inflammatory protein that predicts cardiovascular events. In contrast, levels of interleukin-6 were not related to later increases in depressive symptoms.

The new study, published in the October 2009 issue of the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity, is the first to examine both directions of the depression-inflammation connection and to measure the physical symptoms of depression, such as fatigue and sleep disturbance, in addition to the cognitive-emotional symptoms, such as pessimism and sadness.

Several previous studies have linked depression to increased inflammatory protein levels measured at the same time. These studies, however, cannot speak to which is the cause and which is the effect. "There is two-way communication between the brain and the immune system, so we had to determine whether activation of the body's immune system sent a signal to the brain to affect mood and behavior or whether the depression activated the immune system," said Dr. Stewart, a clinical health psychologist in IUPUI's School of Science and an IU Center for Aging Research affiliated scientist.

Participants in the study were 263 healthy men and women aged 50-70 years at the start of the study. They were tested at baseline and again six years later to determine their levels of depressive symptoms and interleukin-6. Levels of C-reactive protein, another inflammatory protein, were also measured but were not related to depression.

The strength of the association of depression with future heart disease is similar to that of traditional risk factors like smoking, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol, according to Dr. Stewart.

"Promotion of inflammation may be one pathway through which depression may 'get under the skin' to negatively influence cardiovascular health. The link to cardiovascular disease demonstrates that there may be physical as well as mental health reasons to treat depression," said Dr. Stewart.


Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
Indiana University School of Medicine

Related medicine news :

1. Physician-assisted suicide does not increase severity of depression, grief among family members
2. Less than 50 percent of men and women with depression see a doctor for treatment
3. U-M study: Life and death during the Great Depression
4. The Welcome Back Awards Seeks Nominations to Recognize Those Dedicated to the Depression Community
5. Predicting Postpartum Depression May Be Possible
6. New links among alcohol abuse, depression, obesity in young women found
7. Drinking, Weight, Depression Linked in Young Women: Study
8. Depression May Hasten Cancer Death
9. Depression increases cancer patients risk of dying
10. UCLA researchers develop biomarker for rapid relief of major depression
11. Prentice Womens Hospital Launches New Initiative to Better Identify and Address Postpartum Depression
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Depression predicts increases in inflammatory protein linked to heart disease
(Date:11/28/2015)... , ... November 28, 2015 , ... Safe storage for ... of two inventors, one from Lakewood, New Jersey and the other from Bradley Beach, ... patent-pending PROTECTOR to save the expense of having to replace NuvaRings more often than ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... According to an article published November ... meeting in Washington D.C. revolved around the fact that proper dental care, both at-home ... stressed the link between periodontal disease (more commonly referred to as gum disease) and ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... An inventor, from Hopkinsville, Ky., thought ... at home, so he invented the patent-pending ELECTRONIC M.D. , The ELECTRONIC M.D. ... doing so, it could help to prevent potential overdose situations. As a result, ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... ... Herpes-only dating community in the world, revealed that over 50% of its members are under ... under the age of 50 – or 67% of the population - are infected with ... infection . , "The data shocks us highly!" said Michelle Li, Co-Founder of the ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Keeping in mind challenges faced ... and wellness consultation, has collaborated with a leading web-based marketplace for extra-curricular activities ... by parents and bring advice from parenting experts within their reach. As a ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... November 26, 2015 3D bioprinting market ... according to a new report by Grand View Research Inc. ... (CKD) which demands kidney transplantation is expected to boost the ... substitute for organ transplantation. --> 3D bioprinting market ... according to a new report by Grand View Research Inc. ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... of the "2016 Future Horizons and ... Abuse Testing Market: Supplier Shares, Country Segment ... to their offering. --> ... "2016 Future Horizons and Growth Strategies ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... addition of the "2016 Future Horizons ... of Abuse Testing Market: Supplier Shares, Country ... report to their offering. --> ... the "2016 Future Horizons and Growth ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: