Navigation Links
Dense bones linked to raised risk for prostate cancer
Date:7/28/2010

Men who develop prostate cancer, especially the more aggressive and dangerous forms that spread throughout the body, tend to retain denser bones as they age than men who stay free of the disease, suggests new research from Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health.

The finding, published in the July British Journal of Urology International, could help scientists gain a better grasp on what causes prostate cancer and its spread.

Researchers have long known that prostate cancers that spread, or metastasize, often migrate to bone. That idea led Stacy Loeb, M.D., a resident in the Department of Urology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and her colleagues to wonder whether there is a connection between bone characteristics and prostate cancer development and metastasis.

"We reasoned there may be some difference between men who develop prostate cancer, especially metastatic disease, and those who don't, and it was logical to see if there was something different about their bones," says Loeb.

To investigate, she and her colleagues used data from the NIA's Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging , a long-term study that has tracked various health-related information for hundreds of Baltimore-area participants since 1958. The researchers collected data on the bone mineral density of 519 men, measured from 1973 to 1984. They then used the same collection of data to see which men were eventually diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Typically, bone density declines with age in both men and women. However, Loeb and her colleagues found that the 76 men in their study who went on to develop prostate cancer had bone density that remained significantly higher as they aged, compared with those who remained cancer free. The findings held up even after the researchers accounted for lifestyle factors that might influence bone density, such as smoking, body mass index, and intake of dietary calcium and vitamin D.

Further examination showed that the 18 men who developed the high-risk form of the disease retained the highest bone density, but the researchers caution that the number of patients is too small to make any final conclusions about bone features and metastatic disease.

Loeb and her colleagues say that their findings don't mean that bone density scans should be used as a screening tool for prostate cancer. Rather, their goal was to better understand the link between prostate cancer and bone. They say their results suggest that the same factors that influence bone density, such as sex hormones or growth factors in bone, may also be spurring prostate cancer to develop and metastasize. She and her colleagues plan to continue searching for what common factors connect bone density and prostate cancer in future studies.

"If we can elucidate the underlying pathways, we could develop strategies for preventing prostate cancer from occurring or spreading," Loeb says.


'/>"/>

Contact: Christen Brownlee
cbrownlee@jhmi.edu
410-955-7832
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Elemental bones
2. Scientists Find Way to Heal Broken Bones Faster
3. NIH study confirms location of stem cells near cartilage-rich regions in bones
4. With Anorexia, Body May Hoard Fat in Bones
5. Childhood sexual abuse and social shaming linked to health issues later
6. Homeopathic Nasal Zinc Linked to Loss of Smell
7. Behavior problems in school linked to 2 types of families
8. Excess Weight in Older Women Linked to Diminished Memory
9. Brain responses of obese individuals are more weakly linked to feelings of hunger
10. Fish Oil Supplements Linked to Lower Risk of Breast Cancer: Study
11. Glucosamine Ineffective for Lower Back Pain Linked to Arthritis
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Quality metrics are proliferating in cancer care, and are derived ... eye of the beholder, according to experts who offered insights and commentary in the ... Care. For the full issue, click here . , For the American Society ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... , ... June 26, 2016 , ... Pixel Film Studios ... X. , "Film editors can give their videos a whole new perspective by using ... - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProSlice Levels contains over 30 Different ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop ... The fitness app plans to fix the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, ... all type program , They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... health policy issues and applications at AcademyHealth’s Annual Research Meeting June 26-28, 2016, ... work on several important health care topics including advance care planning, healthcare costs ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June ... , brings up a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to ... is not a common occurrence, but a necessary one in the event that lice have ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets has announced ... report to their offering. ... a favourable commercial environment for MedImmune to enter. The US ... will serve to drive considerable growth for effective anti-influenza medications. ... cap sales considerably, but development is still in its infancy. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016  Astellas today announced the establishment of Astellas Farma Colombia (AFC), a new affiliate with operations headquartered ... Latin America . ... ... ... ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the ... (United States, China, Japan, Brazil, United Kingdom, Germany, France, ... Surgical Procedure Volumes: ... provides surgical procedure volume data in a geographic context. ... analysis of growth drivers and inhibitors, including world population ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: