Navigation Links
Delusions Common in Pediatric ICU
Date:5/1/2008

Hallucinations during use of sedatives increase risk of post-traumatic stress, study finds,,,,

THURSDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- About one-third of children in pediatric intensive care units experience delusions, and those delusional memories put youngsters at a higher risk of developing post-traumatic stress syndrome after their hospital stay.

Delusions were more common in children who had to be sedated for more than two days, and in youngsters who were admitted on an emergency basis, according to a study in the first May issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

"In the majority of cases, these delusional memories consisted of one or more hallucinations which were often frightening and which the children could still recall vividly," said study author Gillian Colville, a consultant clinical psychologist and head of the pediatrics psychology service at St. George's Hospital in London. "[Children] reported seeing rats, cats, scorpions on the walls and, in some cases, crawling on the bed, and a couple of children were convinced that their parents had been replaced by imposters."

The timing of these hallucinations was usually around the time the children were being weaned off sedatives. Such medications are used to help control pain and anxiety in children, and in adults, who need intensive medical care.

"Sedatives, and benzodiazepines in particular, interfere with the ability to form new memories, and part of what they do is alter how you remember what's going on," said Dr. Scott Watson, a pediatric intensivist in the division of critical care medicine at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. "Sedating medications also interfere with normal sleep, so processing information and memory is more difficult."

However, because being in intensive care is a stressful experience itself, the authors aren't recommending that the use of sedatives be discontinued but suggest that additional studies be done in children to see if periods of interrupted sedation might lower rates of delirium.

The current study included 102 children between the ages of 7 and 17 who were asked about their experience in the PICU three months after they had been discharged.

Sixty-three percent of the children reported at least one factual memory of their hospital stay, such as seeing their parent at their bedside when they woke, or seeing the video monitors in the PICU.

Thirty-two percent of the youngsters reported having delusional memories. If they were sedated for more than two days, the odds of having a delusional memory increased nearly fivefold, according to the study.

Twenty-seven children had scores high enough to be considered as having "probable" post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and the risk of PTSD was significantly higher for children who reported having delusional memories.

"Some of the symptoms that define PTSD involve the person reexamining what happened in the form of intrusive memories, sometimes known as flashbacks," explained Colville. "These memories are likely to be of the particularly distressing parts of what happened and are associated with strong emotions of fear and threat. On the whole, the children interviewed were much more distressed by their delusional memories than by the factual memories they experienced."

Colville recommended that parents and caregivers be clear and honest with children, in an age-appropriate manner, about what's going on both during their hospital stay and after. She said it's reassuring for children to know that other children have experienced the same types of hallucinations. "Sometimes, [children] have thought they were going mad," she said.

Watson agreed, adding "Children are likely to have confused and potentially disturbing memories of an ICU stay. Despite this, most children appear to recover well and don't suffer from PTSD. If your child is having difficulty or shows signs of PTSD, talk to your provider about getting help."

Symptoms of PTSD include recurrent, intrusive memories or flashbacks of the event, difficulty concentrating, sleeping problems, irritability and lack of enjoyment of normal activities, according to the National Library of Medicine.

More information

To read more about what to expect from a stay in the pediatric intensive care unit, visit the Nemours Foundation's KidsHealth.



SOURCES: Gillian Colville, consultant clinical psychologist, and head, pediatric psychology service, St. George's Hospital, London; Scott Watson, M.D., pediatric intensivist, division of critical care medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; May 2008, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Haunted by hallucinations: Children in the PICU traumatized by delusions
2. Daily aspirin may reduce risk of common type of breast cancer
3. Kidney Care Community Applauds National Taxpayers Unions Endorsement of Medicare Reforms to Extend Patient Private Health Insurance Coverage; Calls Proposal Common Sense Coverage Reform
4. Study shows common vitamin and other micronutrient supplements reduce risks of TB recurrence
5. Common Chemotherapy Drug Linked to Memory Problems
6. Obesity, inactivity as common among cancer survivors as rest of Canadians, study shows
7. Common Medications May Harm Memory in Older People
8. Almost Family Announces Pricing of 2,250,000 Common Shares
9. Cells on path to becoming mature T-cells more flexible than commonly thought
10. Small Brain Lesions More Common Than Thought in Those Over 60
11. Global Med Technologies(R), Inc. Announces the Sale of Approximately 3.3 Million Shares of Global Med Common Stock Held by SingXpress Ltd., an Asian Company, to Five American Institutions
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Delusions Common in Pediatric ICU
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... , ... Valentine’s Day is nearly upon us, and most singles could probably ... flawless hair, and a sparkling personality are all well and good, but if somebody ... home with Rover. (Actually, man’s best friend might not even want to be near ...
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... February 13, 2016 , ... In its newly ... vein visualization technology should be used to ensure patient safety when placing an ... INS Standards mandate the use of vein visualization technology in patients with difficult ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... 12, 2016 , ... According to an article published February 4th ... significant portion of hernia repairs throughout the United States. Commenting on this article, Beverly ... that this trend has not only been expected, but it seems to be a ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... CDRH Enforcement Trends: , Back to the Future , ... , As Winston Churchill said, “Those who don’t learn from history are doomed to ... expect when they come knocking this year. But that takes time. , Take a ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... T.E.N., a ... closed for the ISE Southeast Awards 2016. Finalists and winners of the ISE® ... Southeast Executive Forum and Awards Gala on March 15, 2016 at the Westin ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... February 12, 2016 ... vermerkt)   http://www.sedar.com ) und ... abrufbar.    --> http://www.sedar.com ... http://www.telestatherapeutics.com abrufbar.    --> ... heute seinen Konzernabschluss des zweiten Quartals ...
(Date:2/12/2016)...  Memorial Hermann Health System has teamed up with ... bring a one-of-a-kind experience to pediatric patients at ... as 360-degree video and Google Cardboard, Howard was able ... giving the patients and their families an unexpected, and ... on video . Memorial Hermann IRONMAN ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... , Feb. 12, 2016  Eli Lilly and Company ... Court decided the Alimta® (pemetrexed disodium) vitamin regimen patent would ... the UK, France , Italy ... to dilute the product only with dextrose solution.  ... 2015, the UK Court of Appeal held that Lilly,s patent ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: