Navigation Links
Data suggests Abbott's test may help more accurately diagnose heart attacks in women

AMSTERDAM, Sept. 4, 2013 Abbott announced today promising preliminary results from a study presented at the ESC Congress 2013, suggesting that its high sensitive troponin test may help doctors improve the diagnosis and prognosis of patients presenting with symptoms of a heart attack.1 The test could be particularly beneficial for women, who may have different presenting symptoms and are often under-diagnosed.2 The study, which is being conducted by researchers at the University of Edinburgh, is evaluating Abbott's ARCHITECT STAT High Sensitive Troponin-I (hsTnI) test, which received CE Mark in January 2013.

Cardiac troponin, a protein found in the heart muscle, is considered the preferred biomarker to identify suspected heart attacks, because it can detect injury to the heart.3 Abbott's hsTnI test can measure very low levels of this protein, which is especially important for women, who often have lower levels of troponin than men.4

Researchers shared data from the first 1,126 patients of the study presenting with symptoms of a heart attack. Early findings demonstrate that women have lower peak levels of troponin than men, contributing to the under-diagnosis and therefore under-treatment of heart attacks for women.

"Whilst men and women are just as likely to present to the emergency department with chest pain, currently men are twice as likely to be diagnosed with a heart attack. By using the Abbott high sensitive troponin test and different diagnostic thresholds for men and women, the frequency of diagnosis of heart attacks in women increased and was comparable to men," said Dr. Nicholas Mills, one of the key study authors and cardiologist, University of Edinburgh. "The findings of our study, when completed, could change the way we diagnose heart attacks in women, potentially reducing inequalities in the treatment and outcomes, and enabling everyone to receive the best care."

When completed in 2016, this study will include more than 25,000 patients across 10 centers in Scotland, making it one of the largest studies to evaluate the impact of high sensitive troponin tests on patient care. The study was funded by a special project grant from the British Heart Foundation with Abbott providing the ARCHITECT STAT hsTnI assay.

"While Abbott's high sensitive troponin test benefits both men and women with earlier detection of heart attacks, the potential to increase the diagnosis among women is especially important," said John Frels, PhD, divisional vice president, Diagnostics Research, Abbott. "This is the first time we have seen a test that can provide this kind of detailed information to doctors and has the potential to aid doctors with improving the odds of survival for women with heart attacks."

The ARCHITECT STAT hsTnI assay is commercially available in several countries in Europe, as well as Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Brazil and runs on Abbott's fully automated ARCHITECT family of analyzers. The test is currently for research-use only in the United States.


Contact: Darcy Ross
Fleishman-Hillard, Inc.

Related medicine news :

1. Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer
2. Study Suggests Treating Dyslexia Before Kids Learn to Read
3. Some Folks Just Cant Help Being Nice, Study Suggests
4. Once-Banned Bird Flu Study Suggests Pandemic Threat Is Real
5. HIV Drug Tenofovir Safe During Pregnancy, Study Suggests
6. New study of NIH funding allocations suggests potential efficiency gains
7. Mens Breast Cancer Often More Deadly, Study Suggests
8. Zinc Pills May Shorten Colds, Analysis Suggests
9. Self-Managing COPD Might Pose Risks, Study Suggests
10. Parents are happier than non-parents, new research suggests
11. Discovery suggests new combination therapy strategy for basal-like breast cancers
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... 26, 2016 , ... PawPaws brand pet supplements owned by Whole ... enhance the health of felines. The formula is all-natural and is made from Chinese ... PawPaws Cat Kidney Support Supplement Soft Chews are Astragalus Root Extract and ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Miami, FL (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton ... Plant City Observer , brings up a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: ... The closing for fumigation is not a common occurrence, but a necessary one in the ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... On Friday, June 10, Van Mitchell, Secretary of the Maryland ... iHire in recognition of their exemplary accomplishments in worksite health promotion. , The Wellness ... & Wellness Symposium at the BWI Marriott in Linthicum Heights. iHire was one of ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her ... would lash out at his family verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he ... he would use it. He would throw rocks at my other children and say he ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... of Topricin and MyPainAway Pain Relief Products, join The ‘Business for a Fair Minimum Wage’ ... 2020 and then adjusting it yearly to increase at the same rate as the median ... floor does not erode again, and make future increases more predictable. , The company is ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... WAYNE, Pa. , June 23, 2016 ... provider, will launch its next generation clinical outcomes platform, Bracket ... DIA Meeting held on June 26 – 30, 2016 in ... 6.0, the first electronic Clinical Outcome Assessment product of its ... DIA Booth #715. Bracket eCOA 6.0 is a ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Ill. and INDIANAPOLIS , ... students receiving a Lilly Diabetes Tomorrow,s Leaders Scholarship is ... 2016 scholarship winners, announced today online at ... let type 1 diabetes stand in the way of ... has supported the Foundation,s scholarship program since 2012, and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Revolutionary technology ... Oticon , industry leaders in advanced audiology and ... Oticon Opn ™, the world,s first internet connected ... for IoT devices.      (Photo: ... a number of ,world firsts,: , TwinLink™ ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: