Navigation Links
Damage to Tiny Blood Vessels in Brain May Raise Alzheimer's Risk
Date:2/18/2013

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Damage to tiny blood vessels in the brain might be a secondary contributor to Alzheimer's disease, a new, small study suggests.

Areas of this blood vessel damage, called white matter hyperintensities, are found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease and appear to raise the risk for the condition, the researchers report. It is believed that the accumulation of beta amyloid plaques in the brain are a primary factor in the development of the memory-robbing condition.

"If you have both these white matter hyperintensities and amyloid in the brain, then you are more likely to get Alzheimer's disease down the road than if you just have one of these," said study senior author Adam Brickman, an assistant professor of neuropsychology at Columbia University's Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain.

The exact connection between this vessel damage and Alzheimer's disease isn't exactly clear, he added. While the study showed an association between the two, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

"There are a number of things that happen through aging that can influence the vessels of the brain, but there also might be an interaction with Alzheimer's disease itself, where the disease is damaging the vessels or the vessel damage is causing the Alzheimer's disease," Brickman explained.

These tiny vessels might also become damaged through a variety of conditions, including high blood pressure, low blood pressure, oxidative stress, diabetes or inflammation, he explained.

The goal of the research is to one day target these damaged vessels as a way to slow or prevent Alzheimer's disease, Brickman said.

"Maybe not a primary target, but certainly a potential target," he said. "If we know what the risk factors for white matter disease are, they are perfectly reasonable targets for either prevention or possible treatment."

Limiting the damage to the brain's blood vessels is also important, Brickman said. Keeping body weight and blood pressure levels in the normal range and not smoking can go a long way in preventing Alzheimer's disease, he said.

For the study, Brickman's team looked for blood vessel damage in the brains of 20 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and in 21 people without the condition.

The researchers found that people with Alzheimer's disease had larger areas of damage than those who were not diagnosed with Alzheimer's.

In addition, blood vessel damage in 59 people with mild memory problems who were included in the study were signs that they were at risk for Alzheimer's disease, the researchers added.

Brickman noted that these areas of blood vessel damage are seen in most patients with Alzheimer's disease. "I think the reason we don't see it in every patient is because the MRI technology we use might not be sensitive enough to pick up all the changes in white matter disease," he said.

The report was published in the Feb. 18 online edition of JAMA Neurology.

One expert said the damage to the tiny blood vessels is yet another aspect to the development of Alzheimer's disease, but it complicates understanding the condition.

"This study provides clear evidence that dementia patients in the real world are more complex than those with the pristine pure Alzheimer's disease that we select in research centers," said Dr. Sam Gandy, associate director of the Mount Sinai Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in New York City.

The causes of this blood vessel damage in the brain aren't well understood, but it appears that these white matter hyperintensities do signal brain damage linked to dementia, he said.

Gandy also noted these areas of blood vessel damage make it harder to evaluate the effectiveness of drugs being tested to reduce plaque in Alzheimer's patients.

More information

For more information on Alzheimer's disease, visit the Alzheimer's Association.

SOURCES: Adam Brickman, Ph.D., assistant professor, neuropsychology, Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York City; Sam Gandy, M.D., associate director, Mount Sinai Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, New York City; Feb. 18, 2013, JAMA Neurology, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. 16 Cases of Kidney Damage in 6 States From Synthetic Pot: CDC
2. Synthetic Marijuana Use Linked to Kidney Damage
3. Tylenol Liver Damage Lawyers Are Now Available through Resource4thePeople
4. Subcortical damage is primary cause of neurological deficits after awake craniotomy
5. Scans Show Details of Damage to Soldiers With Head Injuries
6. Stroke damage in mice overcome by training that rewires brain centers
7. Sufferers of a Brachial Plexus Injury Run the Risk of Permanent Damage
8. Rush researchers studying stem cell therapy to repair damaged knee cartilage
9. Newly approved oral medication slows rheumatoid arthritis joint damage
10. Signs of Brain Damage Show Up in Scans of Living, Retired NFL Players
11. FDA Says Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements Can Cause Soft-Tissue Damage, Rottenstein Law Group Reports
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Damage to Tiny Blood Vessels in Brain May Raise Alzheimer's Risk 
(Date:10/13/2017)... BASKING RIDGE, N.J. (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... second annual Holly Day Market. Featuring a collection of specialty vendors and unique items ... myriad of personalized and quality-focused health and wellness services offered by the VNA. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Global Healthcare Management’s 4th Annual ... in Milford, NJ. This free event, sponsored by Global Healthcare Management’s CEO, Jon ... fun run is geared towards children of all ages; it is a non-competitive, non-timed ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of "Success Files," which ... current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with passion and integrity. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... “The Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field”: the story of ... Philippines. “The Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field” is the creation of ... taught all ages and currently teaches a class of ladies at her church, which ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... WILMINGTON, Del. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 ... ... technology and advisory services for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range ... and National Association for Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/28/2017)... 28, 2017 Cohen Veterans Bioscience and Early ... of wearable and home sensors for real-time monitoring of ... Foundation, a nonprofit organization focused on disruptive health solutions ... affordable analytical system to record and integrate behavioral, cognitive, ... ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... PROVIDENCE, R.I. , Sept. 25, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... immunogenicity assessment, vaccine design, and immune-engineering today announced ... focused on the development of personalized therapeutic cancer ... and has provided exclusive access to enabling technologies ... MSc Eng., MBA will lead EpiVax Oncology as ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... Sept. 19, 2017 HistoSonics, Inc., a venture-backed medical device company developing a non-invasive, ... tissues, announced three leadership team developments today:   ... ... ... Veteran medical device executive Josh Stopek , PhD, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: