Navigation Links
DNA particles in the blood may help speed detection of coronary artery disease
Date:7/1/2013

DALLAS, July 1, 2013 DNA fragments in your blood may someday help doctors quickly learn if chest pain means you have narrowed heart arteries, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

The study involved 282 patients, ages 34 to 83, who reported chest pain and were suspected of having coronary artery disease. Researchers used computed tomography imaging to look for hardened, or calcified, buildup in the blood vessels that supply the heart. Blood samples also were tested for bits of genetic material. Release of small DNA particles in the blood occurs during chronic inflammatory conditions such as coronary artery disease.

Higher levels of DNA particles in the blood were linked to high levels of coronary artery calcium deposits. These particles are potentially markers of disease, and may eventually help identify patients with severely narrowed coronary arteries, predict how many coronary vessels were affected, and even whether a patient is likely to suffer a serious heart problem or heart-related death.

"If those markers are proven to be effective specific and sensitive they may improve medical care in terms of identifying patients at risk sooner," said Julian Borissoff, M.D., Ph.D., lead author of the study and postdoctoral research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. "And so the patients may go on treatment sooner."

The scientists noted that larger studies, following more patients for longer periods, are needed to see how precisely these markers might identify patients at risk for developing coronary artery disease. Almost half of the patients studied were followed for a year and a half or longer.

If the markers do pan out, they have the potential to help doctors efficiently pinpoint which patients with chest pain are likely to have coronary artery disease rather than some other problem causing the discomfort, Borissoff said. Currently, a time-consuming and costly battery of tests is used to determine whether the heart is at risk, he said.

It is plausible to think that the DNA particles themselves might contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis and the risk of dangerous blood vessel blockages, the study's authors wrote. "The more the ongoing cell death, which is normal with inflammation, the more DNA enters the circulation and more plaque builds up," Borissoff said. "Cells get damaged, and the products released from the damaged cells can cause even more damage and inflammatory responses."

The researchers are testing the DNA particle components further, he said, to see which ones are most sensitive and to understand more about how their levels might vary for instance, during different stages of progression of atherosclerosis, or during a treadmill test, or after treatment for a heart attack.


'/>"/>

Contact: Maggie Francis
maggie.francis@heart.org
214-706-1382
American Heart Association
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Shape of nanoparticles points the way toward more targeted drugs
2. New gene delivery method: magnetic nanoparticles
3. Shape-shifting nanoparticles flip from sphere to net in response to tumor signal
4. Mayo Clinic: How gold nanoparticles can help fight ovarian cancer
5. New technique can help nanoparticles deliver drug treatments
6. Virus-like particles provide vital clues about brain tumors
7. Study finds tiny, targeted drug particles may be effective in treating chronic diseases
8. Nanoparticles loaded with bee venom kill HIV
9. Researchers show that lipid nanoparticles are ideal for delivering genes and drugs
10. Patients can emit small, influenza-containing particles into the air during routine care
11. New electrically-conductive polymer nanoparticles can generate heat to kill colorectal cancer cells
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/12/2017)... Wis. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... standard products to meet the demand of today’s consumer and regulatory authorities worldwide. ... of probiotic experts and tested to meet the highest standard. , These ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... MD (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... The ... of Excellence to Carol Friedman, PhD, FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual ... – 8. , In honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Information about the ... to develop to enable prevention of a major side effect of chemotherapy in ... in pediatric patients. For cisplatin, hearing loss is FDA listed on-label as a ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... HMP , a leader in healthcare events ... Magazine Eddie Digital Award for ‘Best B-to-B Healthcare Website.’ Winners were announced during the ... The annual award competition recognizes editorial and design excellence across a range of sectors. ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 12, 2017 , ... On Saturday, October 21, the Health & Wellness Center ... to raise money for the American Heart Association Heart Walk. Teams of up to ... together to keep their treadmills moving for 5 hours. Treadmills will start at 7:00 ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/4/2017)... Mass. , Oct. 4, 2017  According to the Centers for ... the end of October . PhysicianOne Urgent Care is helping communities across ... Westchester, NY , by offering no-cost* flu shots through the ... as mandated by certain health insurance regulations. ... The best time to get a flu shot is by the ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... , Oct. 2, 2017 Halo Labs announces the ... analysis system called the HORIZON at MIBio 2017 in ... subvisible and visible particulate matter in biopharmaceutical samples with unprecedented speed ... of the novel technique Backgrounded Membrane Imaging. ... The HORIZON subvisible particle analysis system ...
(Date:9/27/2017)... and NEW YORK , Sept. 27, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... health and big data solutions, today announced that its MyDario product is ... your local TV listings for when The Dr. Oz Show airs in ... The nine-time ... month. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: