Navigation Links
DNA particles in the blood may help speed detection of coronary artery disease
Date:7/1/2013

DALLAS, July 1, 2013 DNA fragments in your blood may someday help doctors quickly learn if chest pain means you have narrowed heart arteries, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

The study involved 282 patients, ages 34 to 83, who reported chest pain and were suspected of having coronary artery disease. Researchers used computed tomography imaging to look for hardened, or calcified, buildup in the blood vessels that supply the heart. Blood samples also were tested for bits of genetic material. Release of small DNA particles in the blood occurs during chronic inflammatory conditions such as coronary artery disease.

Higher levels of DNA particles in the blood were linked to high levels of coronary artery calcium deposits. These particles are potentially markers of disease, and may eventually help identify patients with severely narrowed coronary arteries, predict how many coronary vessels were affected, and even whether a patient is likely to suffer a serious heart problem or heart-related death.

"If those markers are proven to be effective specific and sensitive they may improve medical care in terms of identifying patients at risk sooner," said Julian Borissoff, M.D., Ph.D., lead author of the study and postdoctoral research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. "And so the patients may go on treatment sooner."

The scientists noted that larger studies, following more patients for longer periods, are needed to see how precisely these markers might identify patients at risk for developing coronary artery disease. Almost half of the patients studied were followed for a year and a half or longer.

If the markers do pan out, they have the potential to help doctors efficiently pinpoint which patients with chest pain are likely to have coronary artery disease rather than some other problem causing the discomfort, Borissoff said. Currently, a time-consuming and costly battery of tests is used to determine whether the heart is at risk, he said.

It is plausible to think that the DNA particles themselves might contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis and the risk of dangerous blood vessel blockages, the study's authors wrote. "The more the ongoing cell death, which is normal with inflammation, the more DNA enters the circulation and more plaque builds up," Borissoff said. "Cells get damaged, and the products released from the damaged cells can cause even more damage and inflammatory responses."

The researchers are testing the DNA particle components further, he said, to see which ones are most sensitive and to understand more about how their levels might vary for instance, during different stages of progression of atherosclerosis, or during a treadmill test, or after treatment for a heart attack.


'/>"/>

Contact: Maggie Francis
maggie.francis@heart.org
214-706-1382
American Heart Association
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Shape of nanoparticles points the way toward more targeted drugs
2. New gene delivery method: magnetic nanoparticles
3. Shape-shifting nanoparticles flip from sphere to net in response to tumor signal
4. Mayo Clinic: How gold nanoparticles can help fight ovarian cancer
5. New technique can help nanoparticles deliver drug treatments
6. Virus-like particles provide vital clues about brain tumors
7. Study finds tiny, targeted drug particles may be effective in treating chronic diseases
8. Nanoparticles loaded with bee venom kill HIV
9. Researchers show that lipid nanoparticles are ideal for delivering genes and drugs
10. Patients can emit small, influenza-containing particles into the air during routine care
11. New electrically-conductive polymer nanoparticles can generate heat to kill colorectal cancer cells
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... Florida (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Steven ... event he has completed every year since it started in 2003. This year, he ... the attention of fellow runners and NBA team the Miami Heat. , This Sunday, ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... company's lighter, sleeker next generation LYNX VR Indoor Trainer with multi-rider capability to ... design and manufacturing not only reduce the weight of the unit, they also ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Successful recruitment and retention efforts, new collaborations ... have all marked the last 12 months at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI). ... oldest cancer center, Candace S. Johnson, PhD, outlined the many accomplishments of her ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... The Muscular ... Louisiana Kitchen restaurants, launched the 14th annual “Appetite for a Cure” campaign on ... muscular dystrophy, ALS and related diseases that severely limit strength and mobility. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... York, New York (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... life? The answer may be at the tips of your toes. Foot massage, whether ... as well as pure comfort and relaxation. The American Board of Multiple Specialties ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... 2016 Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN ) will present ... Conference at 9:15 a.m. ET on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, ... W. Meline , executive vice president and chief financial officer ... the presentation can be accessed from the Events Calendar on ... the webcast will also be available on Amgen,s website for ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Feb. 5, 2016  ivWatch, a medical devices company, is ... Award granted by Governor Terry McAuliffe,s office. ivWatch ... February 25th at an event to be held at the ... award honors professionals and business that have made significant contributions ... Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160205/330117LOGO ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... MILTON, Ontario , Feb. 5, 2016  Aralez ... business combination of POZEN Inc. ("POZEN") and Tribute Pharmaceuticals Canada ... of POZEN and shareholders of Tribute. The combined company ... specialty pharmaceutical company with operations in Canada ... the United States . Under the terms ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: