Navigation Links
DNA Test May Cut Hospitalizations Caused by Blood Thinner
Date:3/16/2010

Determining sensitivity can prevent bleeding, clotting problems, study shows

TUESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- A simple genetic test that helps doctors determine the best dose of the blood-thinner drug warfarin for individual patients could reduce hospitalizations by one-third during the early dose-adjustment phase, a new study has found.

The test identifies variations in two genes that strongly influence sensitivity to warfarin (Coumadin), which is used to prevent blood clots in people with high-risk conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, or after surgery to replace a heart valve.

"Genetic testing is a tool clinicians can use to more accurately predict the best warfarin dose early on," Dr. Robert S. Epstein, chief medical officer and president of the Medco Research Institute in Franklin Lakes, N.J., said in a news release from the American College of Cardiology. "Patients may get to a stable dose more quickly and, therefore, have a lower risk of negative outcomes, such as excess bleeding or unwanted blood clotting."

The findings were to be presented Tuesday at the college's annual meeting in Atlanta.

The study included 896 people who, shortly after beginning warfarin therapy, gave a blood sample or cheek swab that was analyzed for expression of two genes -- CYP2C9 and VKORC1 -- that revealed sensitivity to warfarin. People with high sensitivity were put on a reduced dose of warfarin and had frequent blood tests. People with low sensitivity were given a higher dose of warfarin.

During the first six months that they took warfarin, those who underwent genetic testing were 31 percent less likely to be hospitalized for any reason and 29 percent less likely to be hospitalized for bleeding or thromboembolism than were a group that did not have genetic testing.

Epstein said that the cost of the genetic testing -- $250 to $400 -- would be justified by reduced hospitalization costs.

"If we reduce just two hospitalizations per 100 patients tested, that more than compensates for the cost of genotyping," he said.

More information

The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality explains the safe use of blood thinners.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American College of Cardiology, news release, March 16, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Minnesota Department of Health Report: Nearly 6,000 Hospitalizations for COPD in 2007
2. Air pollution linked to hospitalizations for pneumonia in seniors
3. Outpatient Palliative Care Reduces Hospitalizations, Which Impact Costs, While Improving Quality of Life for Seniors and Family Caregivers - New Study in American Journal of Managed Care
4. Swine Flu May Bring Surge in Hospitalizations
5. Fertility Treatment Twins More at Risk for Hospitalizations
6. New Data Demonstrate RISPERDAL(R) CONSTA(R) (Risperidone) Long-Acting Treatment May Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Hospitalizations in Patients with Schizophrenia
7. Avalere Shows Home Health Interventions Associated with Lower Medicare Spending and Re-Hospitalizations for Patients With Chronic Illness
8. American Heart Association Leads Efforts to Reduce Preventable Deaths and Rehospitalizations for Heart Failure Patients
9. High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
10. Global warning: Hotter days, increased hospitalizations for respiratory problems
11. Home Care Tips for Reducing the Risk of Childhood Hospitalizations Due to Asthma
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/27/2016)... , ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... mental health professionals, announced today its affiliation with Tennessee Counseling Association. ... to the network of the Tennessee Counseling Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... , ... June 26, 2016 , ... On June 10-11, ... of the 2016 Cereal Festival and World’s Longest Breakfast Table in Battle Creek, MI, ... the city’s history as home to some of the world’s leading providers of cereal ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Experts from the American Institutes ... Research Meeting June 26-28, 2016, at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. , ... advance care planning, healthcare costs and patient and family engagement. , AIR researchers ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe earned his ... David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine at Scripps ... in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the opportunity to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have ... these feelings, many turn to unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as ... Michigan, has released tools for healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/26/2016)... 27, 2016 Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc (Nasdaq: ... the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976, as amended ... Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("Celator"; Nasdaq: CPXX ) expired ... Time). As previously announced on May 31, ... merger agreement under which Jazz Pharmaceuticals has commenced a ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016  Consumers have ... and regulators/payers have placed more emphasis on patient ... patient support programs in the pharmaceutical industry have ... medications. Consequently, pharmaceutical companies are focusing on becoming ... are providing products and services that improve health. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)...   Bay Area Lyme Foundation , collaborating ... for Tick Borne Illness , Harvard Medical School ... Medicine, University of California, Berkeley, and the Veterans ... finalists of Lyme Innovation , the first ... scientists, clinicians, researchers, entrepreneurs, and investors from several ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: