Navigation Links
DCIS patients who get invasive breast cancer have higher mortality

Women with ductal carcinoma in situDCISwho later develop invasive breast cancer in the same breast are at higher risk of dying from breast cancer than those who do not develop invasive disease, according to a study published online March 11 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Retrospective studies of women with DCIS have compared breast conserving surgery (lumpectomy) to mastectomy and found that survival rates are similar. However, women who have lumpectomy alone, without further treatment, are at higher risk of developing invasive breast cancer in the same breast. Whether women who develop invasive breast tumors after DCIS are also at higher risk of dying of breast cancer has not been clear.

To explore this question as well as the long-term effects of treatments aimed at avoiding invasive recurrence after lumpectomy, Irene Wapnir, M.D., of Stanford University School of Medicine, and James Dignam, PhD of University of Chicago looked at the long-term outcomes of patients with localized DCIS who took part in two large randomized trials, both carried out by the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP). The B-17 trial compared lumpectomy alone to lumpectomy plus radiation therapy in women with DCIS. The B-24 trial compared lumpectomy plus radiation in combination with either tamoxifen or placebo.

Wapnir and colleagues analyzed data on outcomes in both trials after 15 years, including overall and breast cancer-specific survival and survival after development of invasive breast cancer in the same, or ipsilateral, breast.

They found that the development of invasive ipsilateral breast cancer was associated with death rates that were statistically significantly higher than those in women who did not develop an invasive ipsilateral breast cancer. Recurrence of DCIS was not associated with higher mortality. Radiation treatment after lumpectomy reduced the risk of ipsilateral invasive breast cancer compared to lumpectomy alone, and treatment with radiation and tamoxifen reduced the risk compared to radiation only. The reductions in risk were statistically significant.

Among all patients in the trials, the 15-year cumulative incidence of death from breast cancer was 4.7% or less for all treatment groups. Some of these events could be attributed to new invasive contralateral breast cancers.

The authors conclude that, regardless of treatment, women with DCIS have an excellent overall prognosis "despite persistent risks of breast cancer in the same or contralateral breast." They note that three other NSABP trials now in progress will provide more information on other treatment options following lumpectomy.


Contact: Caroline McNeil
Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Related medicine news :

1. 70 percent of prostate cancer patients on ADT gain significant weight in first year
2. Research suggests HIV-infected patients at higher risk for bone fractures
3. Hopkins Childrens study finds some patients with cerebral palsy have asymmetric pelvic bones
4. Study: Homeless patients cost $2,500 more than the average patient for each hospital stay
5. Family Involvement Helps Stroke Patients With Rehab
6. University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center studies new treatment for high-risk aortic patients
7. Abnormal neural activity recorded from the deep brain of Parkinsons disease and dystonia patients
8. Hospitals Urged to Check for Depression Before Discharging Heart Patients
9. Epilepsy-linked memory losss worries more patients than doctors
10. Cancer in HIV-positive patients
11. HBV infection decreases risk of liver metastasis in colorectal cancer patients
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... “While riding the bus, I ... Bronx, N.Y. “I thought there had to be a convenient and comfortable way to ... The PROTECTOR enables disabled individuals to safely travel during cold or inclement weather. In ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... (PHA) announces the nation’s Periwinkle Pioneers, individuals and groups responsible for advancing care ... disease. The Periwinkle Pioneers, nominated by the public, will receive special recognition throughout ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... philanthropic seniors, is resulting in a way for homeless people to have a ... have launched a new initiative whereby they are repurposing plastic bags into sleeping ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Since its launch in 2012, ... adult stem cell therapies to patients with chronic degenerative medical conditions. Now, the ... Registered Trademark (RTM). , Organizations are required to hold a registered trademark in ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Genesis Chiropractic Software ... software creates an agreement between the practice owner and the patient that automatically ... notification, and projections. Click here to learn more. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... FRANCISCO , Nov. 24, 2015  Thanks to ... Dignity Health St. Mary,s Medical Center,s Sister Diane Grassilli ... breast imaging capabilities in San Francisco ... an anonymous friend, stepped forward with a gift of ... for Breast Digital Mammography with Tomosynthesis and Whole Breast ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Colo. , Nov. 24, 2015  Array ... that its Chief Executive Officer, Ron Squarer ... Healthcare Conference in New York.  The public is ... webcast on the Array BioPharma website.Event:Piper Jaffray Annual ... , Wednesday, December 2, 2015Time:1:30 p.m. Eastern Time ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... HOUSTON, TX and VANCOUVER, Nov. 24, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... EPI; NASDAQ: EPIX ) announced today that the ... clinical study of EPI-506 as a treatment for metastatic ... States and Canada.  --> ... --> In the Phase 1/2 clinical trial, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: