Navigation Links
'DASH Diet' Shown to Lower Heart Attack Risk Almost 20%
Date:9/1/2010

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables and low in saturated fats can significantly lower the risk of heart attack for people with mildly elevated blood pressure, Johns Hopkins University researchers say.

The diet they examined -- called the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) -- was designed to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In this new study, it reduced the risk of heart attack by almost 20 percent, the researchers said.

"Heart disease is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States," said lead researcher Dr. Nisa M. Maruthur, an assistant professor of medicine at Hopkins' School of Medicine. "Thus, adoption of the DASH diet should have important benefits on a public health scale."

The diet also calls for reducing fats, red meat, sweets and sugary beverages, and replacing them with whole grains, poultry, low-fat dairy products, fish and nuts. The eating plan is recommended by the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the American Heart Association.

For the study, published online Aug. 31 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, Maruthur's team studied 436 people with high blood pressure or borderline hypertension who were not taking blood pressure medication. The participants were assigned to either the DASH diet; a typical American diet, which is low in important minerals and high in saturated fat, total fat and cholesterol; or an American diet plus more fruits and vegetables.

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, heart failure and kidney disease.

To determine their risk of having a heart attack over 10 years, the researchers used the Framingham Heart Study risk equation.

After eight weeks, the DASH dieters, who were eating nine to 11 servings of fruits and vegetables a day, had reduced their risk of heart attack 18 percent compared with those eating the American diet. They also saw their low-density lipoprotein ("bad") cholesterol levels reduced by about 7 percent and their systolic blood pressure lowered by 7 mm Hg.

While both whites and blacks benefited from the DASH diet, black participants had the greatest benefit, the researchers noted. Blacks on the DASH diet saw their heart risk decline by 22 percent over those on a typical diet, versus 8 percent for whites.

Those who ate the American diet plus fruits and vegetables reduced their risk of heart attack by 11 percent compared with those chowing down the usual American fare.

"The problem with hypertension is that it really is a silent killer because you do not feel it," said Samantha Heller, clinical nutrition coordinator at the Center for Cancer Care at Griffin Hospital in Derby, Conn. Millions of people have no idea their blood pressure is high and are walking around like "ticking time bombs," she said.

Those who know they are hypertensive do not always know what to do about it aside from taking medication, Heller added.

"The good news is that with a few dietary tweaks, the risk of these diseases and their co-morbidities can drop considerably. For example, add a salad or side of vegetables with lunch. Have fruit for dessert. Make your mashed potatoes with olive oil and low-fat milk. Top your pizza with part-skim mozzarella, broccoli, spinach and mushrooms," she said.

"The DASH eating plan is a good way to go for people looking to lower their blood pressure and improve heart health," she said.

Another expert, Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, said although the DASH diet has been shown to lower systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol levels, changing risk factors does not always translate to a reduction in actual heart disease.

"It is therefore essential to hold dietary modification and other forms of lifestyle modification to the same gold standard that statins and antihypertensive medical therapies have been held to," he said. What's needed are prospective randomized trials that demonstrate actual reduction in coronary heart disease events, Fonarow said.

More information

For more information on the DASH diet, visit the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: Nisa M. Maruthur, M.D., M.H.S., assistant professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore; Gregg C. Fonarow, M.D., professor, cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles; Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D., dietitian, nutritionist, exercise physiologist, clinical nutrition coordinator, Center for Cancer Care, Griffin Hospital, Derby, Conn.; Aug. 31, 2010, Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Hopes Dashed That Vitamin D Reduces Cancer Risk
2. Khloe Kardashian and Lamar Odom Open Their Closets to Fans
3. HCD Announces Meaningful Use Dashboard for Health Systems
4. DASH FOR DAD Race Series Coming to 11 Cities to Raise Prostate Cancer Awareness
5. Diverse diet of veggies may decrease lung cancer risk
6. Study findings show value of dietary supplement SAMe in treatment of adults with major depressive disorders
7. Study Suggests Link Between Diet Sodas, Preterm Delivery
8. Diabetes or not, dietary habits of Aftrican-Americans are similar
9. Low Carb-, Low-Fat Diets Tied for Long-Term Weight Loss
10. Western Diet Populates Kids Stomachs With Bad Bacteria
11. Western diet link to ADHD
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
'DASH Diet' Shown to Lower Heart Attack Risk Almost 20%
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... Neurotechnology , ... biometric time and attendance tracking products: the new NCheck Cloud Bio Attendance cloud-based ... Attendance uses biometric face recognition to enable users to check in and out ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... , ... The Executives, Staff & Clients of MGE: Management Experts joined forces ... Literacy Campaign at their Semi-Annual Graduation and Fundraiser Event at MGE’s St. Petersburg Office. ... number 14 internationally in literacy. Statistically, a direct relation can be a found between ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... Prominant bariatric surgeon and well-known ... to offer the recently FDA-approved Obalon Balloon System to his patients. The Obalon ... Surgical’s already comprehensive list of weight-loss services. Dr. Liu is proud to ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Silicon Valley Hair Institute, the San Francisco Bay Area leader ... women’s hair loss. Although hair transplant procedures can be seen as more of a ... can be two reasons a woman may see her hair thinning. , “We are ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... ... adventure that reveals the mystery of Kevin’s purpose. “A Prophets Bones” is the creation of ... of him that he had neglected to do, but this was from God and there ... who would have felt themselves to be special and better than others due to the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/28/2017)... Md. , March 28, 2017  CASI ... to innovative therapeutics addressing cancer and other unmet ... the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.  ... 3 is entitled "Evaluation of ENMD-2076 in ... and the second poster to be presented on ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... -- Elysium Health joins major pharmaceutical companies ... Cambridge academic scientists through ... Therapeutics Institute today announces Elysium Health as a partner to ... for collaborative projects with academic researchers in Cambridge ... first major research investment outside the U.S. for the ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... -- A recent study at Shriners Hospitals for Children – ... country dedicated to the treatment of pediatric burns and ... Surfacide Helios ® UV-C Disinfection System is ... not killed by the EVS (manual) cleaning process alone." ... Association,s 49th Annual Meeting in Boston ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: