Navigation Links
Could an Aging Face Reflect an Unhealthy Heart?
Date:11/6/2012

By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Anxious about those telltale signs of aging? A new study gives you one more reason to worry: Facial aging might point to worsening cardiovascular health.

The Danish study found that people who had three or four signs of aging -- fatty deposits around the eyelids, receding hairlines, baldness, and creased earlobes -- were 39 percent more likely to develop heart disease and 57 percent more likely to have a heart attack over 35 years of follow-up, compared to people of similar age who looked younger.

"Looking old for your age is a good marker for poor cardiovascular health," said study lead author Dr. Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen, a professor of clinical biochemistry at the University of Copenhagen. She presented the findings Tuesday in Los Angeles at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association (AHA).

According to Tybjaerg-Hansen, many doctors explicitly or unconsciously take into account how old patients look for their age when assessing their health. The idea behind this is that a prematurely aged person must be less healthy than someone who has retained the bloom of youth into middle or old age.

"But, really, it's not really well-examined whether this is correct," she said at an AHA press briefing.

To find out, her team looked at aging signs in nearly 11,000 people aged 40 or older who were taking part in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, which began in the late 1970s. The researchers looked at common signs of aging such as wrinkles, graying hair, receding hairline at the temples, baldness at the top of the head (typically for men), earlobe creasing, and yellow deposits of cholesterol around the eyelids (called xanthelasmata).

Tracked over 35 years, about 3,400 participants developed heart disease and more than 1,700 had a heart attack.

Certain aging signs seemed related to normal chronological aging, but not heart disease. "Adjusted for chronological age and for sex, wrinkles were no longer associated with increased risk for disease," Tybjaerg-Hansen noted, and the same held true for graying hair.

But four other outward signs were closely linked with poorer heart health: receding hairlines at the temples, balding at the crown of the head, fatty deposits around the eyelids, and creasing of the earlobes.

For example, Tybjaerg-Hansen said, "if you are a 70- to 79-year-old male and you have three to four [of these] aging signs, then you have a 10-year, 40 percent risk of [developing] ischemic heart disease," significantly higher than men of similar age with fewer aging signs.

Based on the study's results, Tybjaerg-Hansen said that a routine doctor's office exam should include a quick check of these indicators of aging.

Physicians tended to agree with the study findings.

"These subtle skin findings are a helpful part of every clinician's routine physical exam screening," said Dr. David Friedman, chief of heart failure services at North Shore-LIJ's Plainview Hospital in Plainview, N.Y. "I specifically look for signs around the nasal crease and upper eyelid area as a marker for potentially elevated blood cholesterol; and it's interesting that the earlobe crease once again might suggest elevated cardiac risk, which has been mentioned in old physical exam textbooks."

Dr. Kenneth Ong is acting chief of cardiology at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City. He agreed that "these physical findings may assist in earlier identification and management of heart problems."

But he stressed that signs of aging only reflect -- not cause -- heart disease. "People should realize that it is important to distinguish the difference between an association and a risk factor; there may not be much you can do about a receding hairline, but risk factors such as high blood pressure can be treated," Ong said.

And Friedman cautioned about reading too much into the findings. "One shouldn't jump to conclusions if slight fatty skin bumps around the eyes or certain patterns of baldness are seen," he said.

Findings presented at medical meetings are typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

Find out more about the risk factors for heart disease at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SOURCES: Nov. 6, 2012, press briefing, annual meeting, American Heart Association, Los Angeles, with: Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen, M.D., professor of clinical biochemistry, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; David A. Friedman, M.D., chief, Heart Failure Services, North Shore-LIJ's Plainview Hospital, Plainview, N.Y.; Kenneth Ong, M.D., acting chief, cardiology, Brooklyn Hospital Center, New York City


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Red wine, fruit compound could help block fat cell formation
2. Pulse pressure elevation could presage cerebrovascular disease in Alzheimers patients
3. Report says new evidence could tip the balance in aspirin cancer prevention care
4. Climate Change Could Be Tough on Seniors Health: Study
5. Could Menthol Cigarettes Pose Even Higher Stroke Risk?
6. Online Tool Could Diagnose Autism Quickly, Developers Say
7. Codeine After Surgery Could Endanger Certain Kids: Study
8. BMC study shows diverting passengers to elevators could help reduce falls at Logan Airport
9. Discovery could help to develop drugs for organ transplant and cancer patients
10. Feelings of immaturity accompany alcohol misuse into adulthood; discovery could improve treatments
11. Saliva test could dramatically increase detection of oral cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Could an Aging Face Reflect an Unhealthy Heart?
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Comfort Keepers® of San Diego, CA is excited ... To Recovery® program to drive cancer patients to and from their cancer treatments. ... highest quality of life and ongoing independence. Getting to and from medical treatments ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the U.S. are sharpening ... Talker Award, an essay contest in which patients and their families pay tribute to ... at the 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference (AEC) this ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... proud to recognize Dr. Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent plastic surgeon and ... women in the world, and the most handsome men, look naturally attractive. Plastic ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... is actively feeding the Frederick area economy by obtaining investment capital for emerging ... the past 2½ years that have already resulted in more than a million ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Washington, D.C. (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Pro-Am Heroes Golf Classic Tournament held on June 20th at the Woodmont Country ... local charity, Luke’s Wings, an organization dedicated to helping service members that have been ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/26/2016)... 26, 2016 One of Australia,s ... formation of a new biotechnology company, Noxopharm Limited [ABN 50 608 ... IPO and to list on the ASX. Noxopharm is ... to enter a Phase 1 clinical study later this year. ... one of the biggest problems facing cancer patients - the ability ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... , June 27, 2016 Jazz Pharmaceuticals ... waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of ... acquisition of Celator Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("Celator"; Nasdaq: ... p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). As previously announced ... into a definitive merger agreement under which Jazz Pharmaceuticals ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... June 27, 2016  VMS Rehab Systems, Inc. ( ... take whatever measures required to build a strong and ... is currently listed on the OTC Markets-pink current trading ... and CEO, "We are seeing an anomaly in market ... not only by the Company, but shareholders and market ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: